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Calling Dr. Hive.  So the internet says a fasting of blood sugar is normal if it's above a) 70, b) 80, or c) 90.  Which is correct?  
Second, normal blood sugar two hours after eating should be 140?  What if it's higher, but not crazy high?

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Your results should have the range listed. I have blood test done every 3 weeks and my results have range from 68 to 115 for non-fasting 
 

For example, my results for non fasting says this for standard range:

“STANDARD RANGE

70 to 140 mg/dL”

 

I have also done both of the below tests and trend below or just above the lower bound of range

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetes/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20371451

  • Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes.
  • Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood sugar levels are tested periodically for the next two hours.

    A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is normal. A reading of more than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) after two hours indicates diabetes. A reading between 140 and 199 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L and 11.0 mmol/L) indicates prediabetes.”

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It’s been awhile since I read about it. It am pre-diabetic ( but my levels are “normal” bc of diet—but they aren’t truly normal.). However, two hours after eating my levels are suppose to be under 120.  The one hour is ideally under 140. I think normal after two hours would be somewhere under 100.

my fasting levels are in the 90s ideally, but my dh’s are usually 70s-sometimes lower. 

I think you should get your A1C level checked. 

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I asked my doctor about this, drew blood, and said my blood test was in the normal range. 

I have a strip tester.  I have had times where if I didn't eat enough (esp. of the right thing), frequently enough, I'd have a near-fainting spell.  Vision going black, feeling "far away," shaky, etc.  I've never passed out, but I HAVE to sit down, put my head down, and eat something.  My doctor gave me the test kit, but I never used it until this weekend.  I didn't get that bad, but was feeling weak and wobbly, so I finally decided to test and see, and my sugar read 73.  That's supposedly normal?  1 1/2 hours after eating that day, it read 160.

When I was pregnant with my third, the glucose test apparently read low.  Whatever it was, the midwife was startled and said, "You need to eat more!"  I was like, you told me not to!  So that would indicate hypoglycemia, right?  But then I don't understand the spike.

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Fasting bloodsugars between 70 and 100 are normal. In between is probably best. 
 

Bloodsugars 2 hours after meals should actually be 120 or less. 140 or less is the compromise level for those with diabetes. (I am diabetic but still shoot for 120 or less. ). 

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On 4/19/2020 at 9:05 PM, EMS83 said:

I asked my doctor about this, drew blood, and said my blood test was in the normal range. 

I have a strip tester.  I have had times where if I didn't eat enough (esp. of the right thing), frequently enough, I'd have a near-fainting spell.  Vision going black, feeling "far away," shaky, etc.  I've never passed out, but I HAVE to sit down, put my head down, and eat something.  My doctor gave me the test kit, but I never used it until this weekend.  I didn't get that bad, but was feeling weak and wobbly, so I finally decided to test and see, and my sugar read 73.  That's supposedly normal?  1 1/2 hours after eating that day, it read 160.

When I was pregnant with my third, the glucose test apparently read low.  Whatever it was, the midwife was startled and said, "You need to eat more!"  I was like, you told me not to!  So that would indicate hypoglycemia, right?  But then I don't understand the spike.

Sometimes that icky feeling is not how low it is, but how FAST is dropped, and how far. 

Also, some test kits are more accurate than others, strips do expire, etc, 

Finally, things like low blood pressure/vagal reactions can also cause something similar. 

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13 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Also-  if your body is used to bloodsugars in the 160 range, you absolutely can have hypoglycemic feelings at 73. I would test for a week to see what your readings are over time. 

I only have two strips left; I'll order some more and do this.  It's not something I've ever thought could be a problem.  I thought I ate pretty decently and I have literally no risk factors for diabetes/pre-diabetes.  😞 

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1 minute ago, EMS83 said:

I only have two strips left; I'll order some more and do this.  It's not something I've ever thought could be a problem.  I thought I ate pretty decently and I have literally no risk factors for diabetes/pre-diabetes.  😞 

Actually, the gestational diabetes is a risk factor.

The other thing is that you can eat decently and still develop diabetes if you have the right genes.  Healthy food like bananas, corn, rice, sweet potatoes, legumes, tomatoes and all fruit affect my sugar levels. 

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43 minutes ago, EMS83 said:

I didn't have gestational diabetes.  If anything, the number was low after the test.  

Oh, sorry, I must have misread.

Low numbers can actually mean that your blood sugar is spiking high.  After blood sugar spikes high, it goes lower than it was.  So, low numbers after a glucose test can mean that your pancreas is pumping out too much insulin which is overcorrecting.  Type 2 Diabetes occurs bc the cells in your pancreas wear out from this over production.

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1 hour ago, freesia said:

Actually, the gestational diabetes is a risk factor.

The other thing is that you can eat decently and still develop diabetes if you have the right genes.  Healthy food like bananas, corn, rice, sweet potatoes, legumes, tomatoes and all fruit affect my sugar levels. 

Yes, this is me. I have been eating low carb for over 20 years and still developed diabetes. Genes. Stress and illness can trigger it too.

Edited by ScoutTN
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