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6 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

At this point, I don't even know how the schools are going to manage letting students clear out their lockers of personal items. And returning things that are school property that students may have at home, like sports uniforms, computers, calculators, etc. Our schools didn't have students clear everything out before they closed, because the initial  plan was only to be closed for three weeks.

Our schools had "one parent only" come in to pick up belongings and empty lockers. We were organized by letters of the alphabet ("A=C, 9:00 to 9:30 on Tuesday") and instructed to keep distance inside the school. The lockers all had the locks removed and were labeled with student names. When you emptied it, you took the sticky note off. There were tables in the foyer for parents to visually identify student objects that had been left in other classrooms etc. It wasn't perfect, but it felt safe.

They didn't ask for the return of school property because students were considered likely to have use for those things over the emergency distance learning scenario, and they could return them at the end of the so-called school year.

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How do you expect to "figure this out" when the most brilliant, well-educated, and experienced minds on the planet are putting everything they have into figuring this out and they don't have answers? 

Look, you’re freakin out about too many scenarios. You just need to calm the hell down. Said with all loving intentions, of course.  You know which people come out okay when disaster strikes? Tho

Who are you asking to tell you so you can put plans in place?  What do you think anyone can tell you? Everyone here is in a bad position in some way. I have two college juniors stuck at home with me n

Just now, katilac said:

You should absolutely offer it anyway. Send your opinion and your ideas to anyone concerned. If there are ways that parental involvement could make certain things easier, send those thoughts too. Suggest an online discussion or a message board where parents and students could offer their thoughts. 

A studio that you have a key to? Because I would go get my stuff, making a living is a pretty big necessity. 

My studio is in a community center, which is locked off. I have a key to my room, but not one to the building. I'm making it work, but there are a lot of things I use with my preschoolers, especially, that it would be nice to have.

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1 minute ago, dmmetler said:

My studio is in a community center, which is locked off. I have a key to my room, but not one to the building. I'm making it work, but there are a lot of things I use with my preschoolers, especially, that it would be nice to have.

Dang, that stinks. 

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I think all of these ideas for less student density, more washing, and better sick policies are excellent.

I also kind of think we might end up "looping" an entire school year as we implement various possible scenarios of unusual schooling strategies. I kind of wonder if they might, in March 2021 just say, "And we're just going to consider this whole thing to be two school years spent on one year's achievement." -- Leading to the possibility of finishing out that school year with plenty of individual attention, catch up, and "specials" (as you Americans call them). Then everybody would advance to what would have been their next grade in Sept 2021 as a fresh start, and everybody will graduate a year "late" (after 13 years in school) for a while. (Or maybe some students, on teacher recommendation, could 'accelerate' and join their originally scheduled year.)

I don't think it's unreasonable to imagine the virus taking a full year to resolve completely. Why not offer an extra years' educational services to review, refresh, and sort of "make up for" the sometimes-chaotic semi-learning that is on offer in the meantime?

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14 hours ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

DD's friends are still doing specials at home. It's crazy. Most of DD's friends attend a Catholic school. Art is assigned and graded and the kids have must submit photos of their art work. Another friend attends a charter school and they have to do Latin at home. I'm amazed that parents are putting up with it.

My kids also have assignments for art, music, gym, AR reading, and Spanish, which frankly pi$$es me off.  Must be a state law requirement or something.  With my kid having to teach herself math that is hard for her, submitting the assignments near midnight every night, she doesn't need a freaking sketch book assignment.

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Maybe they could start planning for "higher risk" teachers to do more behind-the-scenes work / run online learning and have the younger, healthier ones teach in person while this is going on.

I know it is not ideal, but it seems better than no school at all.

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Another thought is to have the older kids do more online school at home, and spread the younger ones into the buildings currently used for the older classes.  So that way there would be more space for practices that reduce disease transmission.

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1 minute ago, SKL said:

My kids also have assignments for art, music, gym, AR reading, and Spanish, which frankly pi$$es me off.  Must be a state law requirement or something.  With my kid having to teach herself math that is hard for her, submitting the assignments near midnight every night, she doesn't need a freaking sketch book assignment.

Our state has closed schools for the rest of the year and said that nothing assigned after they closed will count towards the final grade. So kids have assignments that have no bearing on their final grade. 

I know some of this is being done to justify the teachers keeping their job. 

Most of DD's friends are in Catholic school so they're not bound by the rule that this work can't count towards the final grade. 

I asked one of DD's friends (4th grade) about her work. I asked if she liked it. She said, unprompted by me, that the teacher was assigning work to keep them busy. Very sad that kids are picking up on it. She said that they had to do the work or they would have to repeat the 4th grade. Of course that's ridiculous. The school isn't going to make any of those kids go back to the 4th grade. For one thing, the 4th grade will be full with the kids coming up from 3rd grade. 

I know that if DD was still at that Catholic school, I wouldn't be making her do all of that work. I would dare the teachers and the principal to get on my case about it. They would still be getting our tuition money. I wouldn't care if they give her zeroes on the assignments because I would know why her final grade would be bad. The only consequence that would matter would be keeping her back which you know they wouldn't do. And if they did keep her back, there's always another school. She's in 4th grade so nothing to worry about for a final transcript for college. 

We homeschool now but if your kid is at home with you and you have to coordinate all of the work the kid does, I'd rather homeschool and do my own assignments. I'm amazed that more parents aren't coming to that same conclusion. 

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Oh! i do think that idea of having the highschool and maybe middle school students stay home and do online classes, and then use those buildings to spread out the little kids, makes sense. The only issue is - that requires way more teachers for the little kids. But maybe fewer for the older kids? 

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1 hour ago, Storygirl said:

At this point, I don't even know how the schools are going to manage letting students clear out their lockers of personal items. And returning things that are school property that students may have at home, like sports uniforms, computers, calculators, etc. Our schools didn't have students clear everything out before they closed, because the initial  plan was only to be closed for three weeks.

This was a discussion at the last school board meeting. They have a plan but don’t want to announce it too quickly because they don’t want to give the impression everything is just “over”.

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26 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

We homeschool now but if your kid is at home with you and you have to coordinate all of the work the kid does, I'd rather homeschool and do my own assignments. I'm amazed that more parents aren't coming to that same conclusion. 

I can't speak for others, but personally I am not coordinating my kids' work.  I wake them up and threaten them to make them submit all their work by the deadlines.  I don't know how to even see what they are doing (it's mostly online), and I'm not sure I want to even if I could.  After all, I don't see what they do in school all day when we aren't on lockdown.

I have enough to do with a full-time job (working at home), managing a reasonably peaceful/orderly home, and making sure people do what is needed for good health.  My role in their schooling currently is to encourage them, be here for questions (they are not asking any though), deal with any messages from their teachers, and a few tasks the school has specifically assigned to parents.

But my kids are 13.  It would probably be different if they were much younger.  I wonder how it's going for folks whose kids are struggling to learn to read etc.  Many of us are still working full time and/or have little idea how to help a struggling learner.

I agree they are extremely unlikely to fail kids based on what happens in the 4th quarter, and I personally am willing to accept it if my kids get worse grades than usual (if they do get grades).  But I did tell my kids they need to do the work or they wouldn't graduate from 8th grade.  This was to get their cooperation, as I can't stand over them and crack a whip all day.  As long as they submit everything before midnight, IMO it's up to their teachers to figure out what to do about any learning issues right now. 

(I do have one of my kids signed up for an online math course that she will take over the summer.  I don't think it's right to make her do it now in addition to online school.)

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2 minutes ago, prairiewindmomma said:

This was a discussion at the last school board meeting. They have a plan but don’t want to announce it too quickly because they don’t want to give the impression everything is just “over”.

Our school board meeting is available to watch online, and I haven't yet, but I will. It's two hours long. Right now in our state, schools are closed through May 1, but the superintendent did release an announcement to seniors (but available for all to read) that they don't expect classes to continue, and they set an alternate graduation ceremony date and prom date for July.

So I bet they have discussed a plan for emptying out the buildings of personal possessions and are waiting to release it until schools are officially closed.

Our governor has said that he doubts schools will reopen but has not issued the orders yet. I expect it may be coming soon, as he has been proactive on many things and has not waited until the last minute to announce things. But technically, he could wait until May 1 to decide.

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2 hours ago, dmmetler said:

Our governor "Strongly recommended" schools stay closed for the remainder of the year. I suspect the local districts would have anyway, but this triggered the official announcement. I'm having a harder time with it than I thought I would. (My community center follows school cancellations and closings). I'm really wondering if I'll have a program left at all by the time things reopen.

Our governor cancelled school for the rest of the year VERY early, and then soon after did a stay at home order until June 10. It was shocking and we grieved when it happened, but now it feels better to have a long time frame that might get lifted earlier, than an ever shifting target. Easier to deal with psychologically at least. 

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3 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Oh! i do think that idea of having the highschool and maybe middle school students stay home and do online classes, and then use those buildings to spread out the little kids, makes sense. The only issue is - that requires way more teachers for the little kids. But maybe fewer for the older kids? 

I don't agree that this is a good idea. Older students are more likely to have classes that can't be done at home or can't be done well online. I'm thinking of lab science classes, vocational programs, or shop type classes. 

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3 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

I don't agree that this is a good idea. Older students are more likely to have classes that can't be done at home or can't be done well online. I'm thinking of lab science classes, vocational programs, or shop type classes. 

Plus, while my older kids could stay home alone, it's really hard for them to self teach Spanish 3 or algebra or chemistry or AP History.  

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18 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

I don't agree that this is a good idea. Older students are more likely to have classes that can't be done at home or can't be done well online. I'm thinking of lab science classes, vocational programs, or shop type classes. 

I have two in college and a high schooler that's dual enrolled at the CC.  StateU and the CC have moved to online classes.

They each have at least two lab classes. They are complaining loudly about the "missing labs" or having to recreate labs at home.

They are all talking about not taking lab classes in the fall if the fall semester is online.  I've suggested that they wait to the last possible minute to register for the fall semester. I'm out of ideas or suggestions for them.

I have huge sympathy for younger students and their teachers in traditional schools

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Honestly, I wish schools would allow an "opt out" program.  I would be okay with my kids repeating grades rather than trying to slog through this.  Or let us opt out and just fully homeschool.  Just start back when it's safe to start back and stop trying to keep going.  

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9 minutes ago, Terabith said:

Honestly, I wish schools would allow an "opt out" program.  I would be okay with my kids repeating grades rather than trying to slog through this.  Or let us opt out and just fully homeschool.  Just start back when it's safe to start back and stop trying to keep going.  

 

Me too.  I emailed younger Ds's principal asking if he could test out of the remainder of the school year.  She was adamant that students had to finish the year.  Ds is so bored.  We considered pulling him but the district has 14 days to process homeschool paperwork.  The student must remain enrolled those 14 days.  There are 28 days left in the school year.  

My older son likes his online classes. Most of them are live and interactive which makes a big difference.  

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3 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

I see what some of my teacher friends are describing and it's amazing.  But those are mostly teachers in private or in small charters who are well supported by admin, and are allowed to design what works for them and their students.  Their kids are playing in games, and meeting in small groups in online breakout spaces, and completing research with tools the schools already had.  

My friends in large public districts are basically teaching with their hands tied behind their back.  The teachers are just as strong, but they are so restricted that what they're doing is really limited.  A large district near me waited 4 weeks to start online learning and the first day went so badly that they have canceled the rest of the week to problem solve.  The issue seems to be a combination of a computer network that couldn't handle all the online classes, and a lack of security features that allowed kids to log in anonymously and spam the classrooms with porn.  

The district I live in is doing slightly better, but not hugely better.  Kids get maybe 1 zoom class a week, and some worksheets.  

Oh yeah, I don't blame our teachers at all.  It's an impossible demand.  

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7 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

I didn't think you were.  I don't think online schooling is an impossible demand, especially for older kids.  I think there are places that are already doing it well, both established online programs, and smaller schools or maybe smaller districts that have been positioned to respond quickly to the crisis.  

But I think that if large school districts are going to have an online option in the fall, it needs to be a real online option.  They need to buy a curriculum that's already written for online learning, implement training, and do it right.  It doesn't have to be perfect, but it has to be better than what they're offering now.  

Yeah, there's definitely ways to do it well.  (Though not for the little kids.)  This was just thrown into quickly with no preparation, with no curriculum, and with a school system where a huge percentage of families don't have internet or enough devices. 

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On 4/13/2020 at 6:30 PM, dmmetler said:

I honestly don't know how to manage in a school setting. If our preschool reopens, I will probably do one class a day, rather than doing all my classes on one day, so I have time to clean instruments, and not use some of the wood instruments that are not Clorox wipes friendly. My load was never below 25 class sections a week while teaching in a public K-8. There would be no way to clean everything. Having been that specialist, and having taught specialists, the safest thing would be to not have specialist music classes in elementary at all-but I can't see that going over well for either kids or classroom teachers, both of whom definitely need that break in their day. 

Students could clean the instrument they are using, teach how first, then spend first few minutes of class everyone cleaning with you monitoring cleaning.  

ETA: It's kind of yucky to not continue doing that, now that I think of it!!  Much  more hygienic, a decent practice to continue.

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22 hours ago, Terabith said:

So we shorten the school day....  When I've taught in elementary school, kids were NOT ALLOWED to wash their hands at any point, because hand washing for 20 plus kids took too much time.  And it really does take like 25 minutes for each child to thoroughly wash his or her hands.  If we go back, we have to include hand washing time.  That's going to eat into our time schedule.  

Plus, I worry about teachers, who are frankly more vulnerable than most school aged students, who are still being exposed to 30 kids a day, even if it's in shifts.  But frankly, the real reason we have school is to provide, not so much an education, but food and child care.  Both sets of kids would need to eat at least lunch.  And the child care situation is still significant.  

I agree that I'd rather do alternating days.  Honestly, elementary could easily be done in half day shifts.  I'm really concerned about high school though.  They need the full day.  

Round hand washing stations!  Probably expensive to add in after the fact, unfortunately.  Very efficient and easy to monitor, though.  

 

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2 minutes ago, ElizabethB said:

Round hand washing stations!  Probably expensive to add in after the fact, unfortunately.  Very efficient and easy to monitor, though.  

 

Yes, any classroom I've ever been in, I would have killed for a few sinks to allow for hand washing and clean up of paint or glue, etc.  

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5 hours ago, SKL said:

My kids also have assignments for art, music, gym, AR reading, and Spanish, which frankly pi$$es me off.  Must be a state law requirement or something.  With my kid having to teach herself math that is hard for her, submitting the assignments near midnight every night, she doesn't need a freaking sketch book assignment.

 

So far, my kid only has an assignment for PE, to answer some questions, and to plan and cook a meal in the next month for Home Ec. 
But she's year 7, which is the first year of high school here, so not very important in the scheme of things.

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2 hours ago, Terabith said:

Plus, while my older kids could stay home alone, it's really hard for them to self teach Spanish 3 or algebra or chemistry or AP History.  

Lots of kids take those classes online in my state. The problem is that is via FLVS, and the kids home now for stay in place are not using that system. But supposedly it can be done. It's a big deal here. 

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I wonder if they could do "lab intensives" like whatever that company was that did them for homeschoolers. So each weekend at the school someone is there to teach SMALL groups of kids a bunch of lab stuff, do labs, etc then write them up and turn them in to regular class during the week? So each kid goes maybe once a month to the lab, but for several hours at a time?

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The only class of mine that is continuing is an algebra class.  I share my screen showing my powerpoint and using a drawing tablet to work out problems so they can see.

One of the reasons I haven't continued any other classes is because I don't want to be just talking at them.  My classes were all very hands-on.

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Our governor announced about a week ago that schools will be closed for the rest of this school year. Then today, our school district announced that 4th quarter grades will be: A / pass / incomplete. I’m so relieved because my 11th grader’s teachers have definitely overcompensated with the work. I’m trying to work full-time from home and it’s been hard helping him stay on top of everything and get my own work done. 

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1 hour ago, ElizabethB said:

Round hand washing stations!  Probably expensive to add in after the fact, unfortunately.  Very efficient and easy to monitor, though.  

 

 

Our elementary school has half-round washing stations outside the restroom proper. (only toilets behind the door. So the teacher can monitor against playing around with water while waiting students are lined up)

The middle schools have no soap in the restrooms though 😞

 

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Good Twitter thread from about the Trump plan from the Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security. 

The new plan from the Administration called “Opening up America Again” has a number of good elements in it, but also elements that are missing or concerning

In a nutshell, we need a vaccine before life returns to normal. 

It discusses the need for rapid testing and a plan for contact tracing. 

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8 hours ago, Storygirl said:

https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/14/us/cdc-fema-national-strategy/index.html

I don't know if anyone has posted this. But the preliminary leaked national recommendations includes schools opening first, before businesses.

Which makes sense from a childcare perspective and because young people are supposedly less likely to get it. But it does not make sense when you factor in that there are adults working in schools, and that children will be able to carry the virus home to family members, even if they themselves don't acquire symptoms.

I don't know what the answers will be, but it won't be easy. I don't think that schools can just say, "Yay, we are open again!" and go back to normal. Which means they need time to put new measures into place. I think most schools will not reopen before fall, despite what this leaked report suggests about them reopening in the first phase.

I suspect a lot will vary by governor, and whether they retain control or hand it over to counties/districts the way (at least here) they started out when it came to closings. Based on the mixed things I’m hearing about my own district, they might be stupid enough to to do dumb things if allowed. I’d like to say that my governor will keep a strong hand, but there have been reasons for me to think he doesn’t really understand my particular region very well.

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3 hours ago, Sherry in OH said:

 

Me too.  I emailed younger Ds's principal asking if he could test out of the remainder of the school year.  She was adamant that students had to finish the year.  Ds is so bored.  We considered pulling him but the district has 14 days to process homeschool paperwork.  The student must remain enrolled those 14 days.  There are 28 days left in the school year.  

My older son likes his online classes. Most of them are live and interactive which makes a big difference.  

From your username, I assume you're in Ohio? When you send homeschool paperwork, you can remove your child immediately. You do NOT need to wait until the school processes it.  Your child does not remain enrolled for those 14 days. The school has 14 days to ask for more information, but they can take as long as they want to process it. The second you send your notification, your child is a homeschooler. If your school has told you otherwise, they're making that up. You can send your paperwork tomorrow and ditch the online stuff immediately.

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2 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

From your username, I assume you're in Ohio? When you send homeschool paperwork, you can remove your child immediately. You do NOT need to wait until the school processes it.  Your child does not remain enrolled for those 14 days. The school has 14 days to ask for more information, but they can take as long as they want to process it. The second you send your notification, your child is a homeschooler. If your school has told you otherwise, they're making that up. You can send your paperwork tomorrow and ditch the online stuff immediately.

 

That's what I thought, too.  It always used to be that way but I don't know if anything has changed.  I was always told that OH is a notification state and not an approval state.  So, once you send in your notification, you are free to withdraw your child from public school. Many times the schools have no idea what the law is and/or they want you to do whatever is best for them, which you are not obligated to do.  

Many years ago, before I knew of any homeschooling groups online, I tried to withdraw dd from public school and was given misinformation by the homeschooling coordinator for the county that led me to believe I wasn't allowed to when I actually was.  I ended up using a virtual school instead and it was fine, but it still makes me mad that no one in charge seems to know what they are doing (or care).  Many many districts have no idea what the homeschooling laws are or they try to overreach their authority.  

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2 hours ago, StellaM said:

 

Someone has to create the materials for the high school and middle school kids, run their online classes, mark and grade work, support students, continue their own professional development in online learning etc. You can't do that with fewer teachers, or rather, you can try, and the online learning environment for those kids will be cr*ap. Because teachers can't magic up an adequate online environment at short notice, with minimal training AND understaffed.

 

I'd think they would do some kind of training over the summer? Like I said, my state already has robust K-12 online schooling. Most students arleady take at least one class via online learning at some point. It would be a matter of ramping up, not starting from scratch. 

1 hour ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

Yeah, I think there are better models than all sitting and staring at each other on Zoom while the teacher talks.  I don't think that lecture based classrooms work real well to begin with, but if you're going to lecture, then you'd still want to be projecting your powerpoint, or an interactive whiteboard or something.  

Yeah, that's pretty crazy. My husband teaches online now, and he records 2 out of 3 weekly lectures and does a live lecture with Q and A time once a week. For the recorded ones at least, he does not use video of himself -the video portion is powerpoint slides, and he records himself talking as he explains each one. 

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2 hours ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

Yeah, I think there are better models than all sitting and staring at each other on Zoom while the teacher talks.  I don't think that lecture based classrooms work real well to begin with, but if you're going to lecture, then you'd still want to be projecting your powerpoint, or an interactive whiteboard or something.  

You can put your powerpoint or notes up on Zoom if you are the meeting host. I'm on a board of directors that uses Zoom to meet frequently and our president does it all the time. If you ever use Outschool (which uses Zoom), the teachers use screen sharing intensively to teach.

 

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I teach public high school. We are definitely limited in what we can do. We have permission to use zoom with students but with all kinds of threats about losing our license. I'm recording videos of my desktop using screencastomatic and posting that for my students. Once I have had several students with the same question, I post a new video explaining that. I'm available by email and I have a google voice number that parents can call or text me on (provided by the school). We are required to touch base with every family where the student has not turned in an assignment the week before. We don't start grading until this week, but we haven't been given grading guidelines yet. The board meeting was a few hours ago and they should be sending us grading guidelines in the morning.

There is no way to socially distance at all in schools right now. We'd have to cut the school population in half either by having a morning shift and an afternoon shift or by having alternating days.

We have an idiot governor. I'm afraid he's going to say that schools go back May 4th, despite the fact that we are still going up and our peak is several weeks away. While the Travis county judge is good. Our judge is not. He was mostly following along with the Travis county judge, but two weeks ago he "borrowed" fire fighter equipment and drove it out to his grandson's house to go to his birthday party while we were all under his "stay at home" order. He's hiding now.

 

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46 minutes ago, AngieW in Texas said:

I teach public high school. We are definitely limited in what we can do. We have permission to use zoom with students but with all kinds of threats about losing our license.

Can you explain what you mean about losing your license?

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As a teacher In upstate NY, we don’t even have curriculum materials provided to us for any subjects other than math. We cobble together our own stuff for each subject based on the standards we are supposed to cover. So, to think a district is going to purchase “all online designed curriculum” to implement is probably a pipe dream. There’s zero money for that. We don’t even have any textbooks. I buy my own units off Teachers Pay Teachers.

Signing kids up for something like K-12 would work, but our state doesn’t recognize K-12 as an educational option.

It would be nice if we could offer all grades the same well designed online curriculum, but I don’t see it happening. We are training ourselves on how to use our online platform and I’ve put together my curriculum so far using Teaching videos, read alouds, worksheets, YouTube videos, and educational sites like Brainpop & Mystery Science. But it’s very much a hodgepodge. I’m doing the best I can with limited choices. Oh and not every area in my district can even get internet / phone access for streaming- it doesn’t exist in all of our rural area. So some kids are just getting crappy packets of worksheets with no instruction or interaction other than a phone call from me.

If we knew we would be out in the fall we could prepare better options, working all summer to prep for new content, and not getting paid for it as usual-  at this point we don’t even know who is teaching what grade in the fall (there’s always some movement). Add in the complication that I’m a special Ed teacher trying to provide support to kids in gen ed classes and things get complicated.  My students need a lot of support they aren’t getting & my kids with behaviors are not doing any work at home for their parents- I can barely get them to do anything at school.


Right now I simply cannot teach my own kids at home, teach my current students from home, and plan excellent remote instruction for fall.

Feeling pretty defeated about the whole thing this morning.

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4 hours ago, CAJinBE said:

Can you explain what you mean about losing your license?

I can. In my district we have been told to use the platform provided by the school (Schoology)- it’s like google classroom.
If we use something else like zoom and there are any problems, the school will not support us legally. some places teachers are doing 1:1 video chats with students but that’s getting iffy - no supervision. 

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21 hours ago, bolt. said:

I don't think it's unreasonable to imagine the virus taking a full year to resolve completely. Why not offer an extra years' educational services to review, refresh, and sort of "make up for" the sometimes-chaotic semi-learning that is on offer in the meantime?


 

Hm. This is interesting because it’s a different perspective. 
 

I don’t view the purpose of the quarantine to stop, avoid, or resolve the virus. I see the virus as an ever present, continually evolving virus, like the flu.  I see the quarantine as a solution to hospital capacity. As a novel virus, there is no one immune. The hospitals would be overwhelmed if we couldn’t slow the spread. Even as a high risk, very careful person (for now) I do not believe I can always avoid this virus. Exposure is inevitable. I just want to avoid getting it at the peak so I can ensure myself the best case scenario in the hospital.

Once a large group has been exposed and healthcare workers have been exposed and recovered, I see no reason to continue the quarantine. Thoughts?

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14 hours ago, mom2scouts said:

From your username, I assume you're in Ohio? When you send homeschool paperwork, you can remove your child immediately. You do NOT need to wait until the school processes it.  Your child does not remain enrolled for those 14 days. The school has 14 days to ask for more information, but they can take as long as they want to process it. The second you send your notification, your child is a homeschooler. If your school has told you otherwise, they're making that up. You can send your paperwork tomorrow and ditch the online stuff immediately.

 

Thanks, but I am no longer in Ohio.  If I were I would still be homeschooling.  

In the grand scheme one month isn't worth fussing over.  We have told ds to do the minimum.  If he ignores the extra optional assignments, many of which are remedial, and links to additional resources, ds can finish in 2-3 hours. That gives him the remainder of the day to play, read, or study topics of interest to him.  If he does all the assignments, many of which are remedial, school takes all day.    His grades may fall, but as long as submits the daily attendance assignments, won't fall enough to jeopardize grade advancement.  

I need to focus my attention on the summer.  One of his summer camps has been canceled.  I won't know about the others until May, but suspect that one will be canceled and the other run as an online course.   In the past, I have required math, reading, instrument practice, and one hour of physical activity on days he didn't have outside activities.  I want to add a bit more this year but not so much that it becomes drudgery.

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2 hours ago, BlsdMama said:


 

Hm. This is interesting because it’s a different perspective. 
 

I don’t view the purpose of the quarantine to stop, avoid, or resolve the virus. I see the virus as an ever present, continually evolving virus, like the flu.  I see the quarantine as a solution to hospital capacity. As a novel virus, there is no one immune. The hospitals would be overwhelmed if we couldn’t slow the spread. Even as a high risk, very careful person (for now) I do not believe I can always avoid this virus. Exposure is inevitable. I just want to avoid getting it at the peak so I can ensure myself the best case scenario in the hospital.

Once a large group has been exposed and healthcare workers have been exposed and recovered, I see no reason to continue the quarantine. Thoughts?

I think even after healthcare has widespread immunity, you still have to work to prevent the system from being overwhelmed with patients. Everyone should have reasonable access to needed care. The problem here is that our system runs at 95% capacity in normal non-flu season times—it doesn’t take much to overwhelm it. At that rate, it would take over a decade to get herd immunity.

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4 hours ago, BlsdMama said:

Hm. This is interesting because it’s a different perspective. 
 

I don’t view the purpose of the quarantine to stop, avoid, or resolve the virus. I see the virus as an ever present, continually evolving virus, like the flu.  I see the quarantine as a solution to hospital capacity. As a novel virus, there is no one immune. The hospitals would be overwhelmed if we couldn’t slow the spread. Even as a high risk, very careful person (for now) I do not believe I can always avoid this virus. Exposure is inevitable. I just want to avoid getting it at the peak so I can ensure myself the best case scenario in the hospital.

Once a large group has been exposed and healthcare workers have been exposed and recovered, I see no reason to continue the quarantine. Thoughts?

I've thought the same as you regarding this quarantine period. But then I see people talking about not resuming activities until a vaccine is in place, which seems to be a very different benchmark. If we are operating in ways to flatten the curve (versus trying to eliminate chance of infection), I feel like schools should be able to resume in the fall but having rolling starts and modified schedules to reduce total number of students in a building at one time. I also think high schools, and possibly middle schools, should adopt a hybrid model, where students don't need to be on campus full-time. My local high school was already doing this before all of this started to reduce population on campus and prevent over-crowding. 

Everyone I've talked to IRL has been supportive of the quarantine in this area ending in early summer as long as our medical system is doing well. It's only on this message board and in some news articles that I've heard of people thinking that the quarantine will be extended until there is a vaccine and/or a way to ensure zero exposure. That doesn't seem realistic to me to change the intent of social measures from flattening the curve to disease eradication.

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https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/education/story/2020-04-16/uc-san-diego-might-stick-with-online-classes-this-fall-due-to-coronavirus-crisis

“UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep Khosla said Thursday that the school might stick with online courses for the fall quarter due to the coronavirus, but that he doesn’t see it becoming a permanent arrangement. 

He said the University of California system is considering the option for its undergraduate campuses and that UC executives will make the final decision. 

“I think (staying with online) is completely within the realm of possibility,” said Khosla, whose school has nearly 39,000 students.

“We have not made a decision about the fall quarter yet. We are looking at multiple models and have activated a continuity of education task force, a continuity of research task force and are also working with public health experts to help inform such a decision in concert with the UC system.””

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1 hour ago, meena said:

I've thought the same as you regarding this quarantine period. But then I see people talking about not resuming activities until a vaccine is in place, which seems to be a very different benchmark. If we are operating in ways to flatten the curve (versus trying to eliminate chance of infection), I feel like schools should be able to resume in the fall but having rolling starts and modified schedules to reduce total number of students in a building at one time. I also think high schools, and possibly middle schools, should adopt a hybrid model, where students don't need to be on campus full-time. My local high school was already doing this before all of this started to reduce population on campus and prevent over-crowding. 

Everyone I've talked to IRL has been supportive of the quarantine in this area ending in early summer as long as our medical system is doing well. It's only on this message board and in some news articles that I've heard of people thinking that the quarantine will be extended until there is a vaccine and/or a way to ensure zero exposure. That doesn't seem realistic to me to change the intent of social measures from flattening the curve to disease eradication.

I've written that life won't return to normal until there is a vaccine. I don't think that's the same as extending the quarantine. A long term quarantine isn't realistic or sustainable. Based on what we know today (information keeps changing), it does not appear safe to resume activities that require crowded indoor spaces without herd immunity. I think children can return to school with some modifications to allow for less crowded conditions. Our children must be cared for and educated so it's unreasonable (IMHO) to require disease eradication before resuming school. 

But it's not unreasonable to avoid certain activities without a vaccine or herd immunity. Do we need to attend football games, concerts, plays? Is that as necessary as providing an education to our children? I don't think so. That's why I say life won't return to normal without a vaccine or herd immunity. Even if those events are allowed by the government, enough people will avoid them to have an impact. 

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I know this is a summer/fall thread, but some folks are mentioning current school year, and I don't know where else to put this.

My kids' school has [finally] started posting grades for the "quarantine period" work.  (This is our 5th week out of school.)  So far, they are mostly getting 100% for participation (or so it seems).  A few grades came through as 75% (3 out of 4 possible) which may or may not mean incomplete work.

I hope nobody thinks these grades are meaningful.  My kid who got 100% on the online math test probably spent the entire day with the math book at her side just to get through that one (presumably multiple choice) test.  It doesn't mean she's gonna do great in math next year....

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I told my parents that we will be online for piano for the summer session.  I follow the schools on closings and they are not reopening this year or doing summer school/summer camps except online, so it seems the right choice-and it avoids the questions as to whether the community center will reopen or not. I'm not happy about it, and I expect to lose even more students, but I think it's the least bad choice right now.

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