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Farrar

Homeschooling in the headlines

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How's everyone feeling about the way that homeschooling is being covered what with so many kids suddenly home?

I feel like the coverage has all be very positive and the looking to homeschool parents for advice and wisdom has all been very kind. The companies providing free services is really nice and appropriate.

But there's something about it all that chafes me that I'm having trouble pinpointing.

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What is getting me, locally news wise, is they are acting like PS kids being home for 4 weeks and doing a math sheet IS homeschooling. It's not homeschooling. They're making it sound simple and trite. That's what I can pinpoint personally. Cancelling school and having teacher directed worksheets at home for a month is NOT the same thing as taking charge of your child's education and intentionally directing it, and being involved within it, which is what constitutes homeschooling in my book. (ETA- generally speaking). 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
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It's the assumption that "doing homework packets provided by ps" and "emergency virtual classrooms" is a true model of homeschooling. 

These poor kids are coming home in bewilderment and chaos, many to homes where parents are both working / not there / beyond stressed, and told that that's homeschooling. 

It's not, and they have no idea, and that's not their fault, but yes, it chafes, to those of us who have carefully curated and prepared and cultivated and nurtured an academic experience so far removed from what they will always call "homeschooling."

 

Edit: It's like calling overcooked, fake-cheese, no-salt-added, comes in plastic bags "Macaroni and Cheese" in the school lunch cafeteria when there are a few of us in the room who have known and experienced Aunt Rachel's cheddar-baked, onion-crumb-sprinkled, toasted-to-perfection Southern hospitality on a Sunday lunch "Macaroni and Cheese." They seem to have the same NAME, but nothing else in common, and only the lunchroom ladies think they're the same food.

*No disrespect to lunchroom ladies. They kept me alive through my childhood.

Edited by Lucy the Valiant
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At least around me, most kids got very little work. They really are on their own. Parents I know seem to be taking the advice I see from homeschooling moms to heart and are doing things like cooking with their kids, setting aside some reading time, and maybe having them do a little math on Khan or IXL or something. I mean, I feel like that's good practices. We'll see how long it last or how far it goes.

Some places are talking about lasting into next school year. I... can't even.

It's not the same as homeschooling... but it's not not homeschooling either. I think everyone knows that. Maybe that's what feels weird? But I'm not sure.

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It's not helping matters that the same media that has been side-eyeing homeschooling for a long time now and pouncing on every "bad homeschooler" story has now suddenly embraced this crack pot, thrown together pretention of "crisis schooling" as a lovely field of flowers to run through. No one is asking questions to the school districts -where'd the microscope go putting everyone under suspicion and screaming for regs?! 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
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6 minutes ago, Farrar said:

At least around me, most kids got very little work. They really are on their own. Parents I know seem to be taking the advice I see from homeschooling moms to heart and are doing things like cooking with their kids, setting aside some reading time, and maybe having them do a little math on Khan or IXL or something. I mean, I feel like that's good practices. We'll see how long it last or how far it goes.

Some places are talking about lasting into next school year. I... can't even.

It's not the same as homeschooling... but it's not not homeschooling either. I think everyone knows that. Maybe that's what feels weird? But I'm not sure.

You're seeing a whole different angle than I am- I will admit. Sounds like yours is better. 

I am instead seeing friends from PS with kids with maybe one worksheet the teacher threw together (or maybe TPT?), while both parents are working at home and crying into their vessels of alcohol because the kids are home for a month with no camps to pack them off too. Meanwhile the kids all have anxiety through the roof from suddenly being purged from their friends, and don't even get me started on kids with college apps/testing/acceptances coming up. It's train wreck stress city. 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
can't type or spell :)
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1 minute ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

You're seeing a whole different angle than I am- I will admit. Sounds like yours is better. 

I am instead seeing friends from PS with kids with maybe one worksheet the teacher threw together (or maybe TPT?), while both parents are working at home and crying into their vessels of alcohol because the kids are home for a month with no camps to pack them off too. Meanwhile the kids all have anxiety through the roof from suddenly being purged from their friends, and don't even get me started on kids with college apps/tesing/accepatances coming up. It's train wreck stress city. 

I'm definitely seeing the stress for the teen families around stuff. But I don't know a lot of parents who whine about their kids unless it's in a lighthearted way. Like, yeah, I've seen some people joking that they should pay the teachers more or that they're going to go nuts doing this for a month or whatever, but it's not in a serious way. It's in a blowing off steam sort of way. Everyone I know with younger kids seems to get that they'll be fine missing some school and that it's not a huge deal.

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Lastly (sorry to dominate your thread Farrar)- am I the only one concerned that some people are going to use this as an excuse to pull their kids and then either do nothing, or take advantage of the situation as so many of the abusive parents seem to have done in those spotlight media cases? This just seems beyond nuts to categorically throw kids at home in all situations. I hope, but doubt, that CPS is keeping tabs on the kids who were already red flagged at the schools for being in abusive situations. I do not see how this is going to go well for a lot of at risk kids, and judging by some of the stories posted here earlier this year about CA Family Services/CPS/whatever its called, they already were having a LOT of problems. And now they are all home. With no interaction with the outside world. 😢

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9 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

It's not helping matters that the same media that has been side-eyeing homeschooling for a long time now and pouncing on every "bad homeschooler" story has now suddenly embraced this crack pot, thrown together pretention of "crisis schooling" as a lovely field of flowers to run through. No one is asking questions to the school districts -where'd the microscope go putting everyone under suspicion and screaming for regs?! 

I saw something similar discussed in a very different context - people with disabilities furious that suddenly schools are happily giving these "accommodations" that some people have needed for chronic illness, physical disabilities, etc. for years. 

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1 minute ago, Farrar said:

I saw something similar discussed in a very different context - people with disabilities furious that suddenly schools are happily giving these "accommodations" that some people have needed for chronic illness, physical disabilities, etc. for years. 

Services at home type of things they are wanting? 

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2 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Lastly (sorry to dominate your thread Farrar)- am I the only one concerned that some people are going to use this as an excuse to pull their kids and then either do nothing, or take advantage of the situation as so many of the abusive parents seem to have done in those spotlight media cases? This just seems beyond nuts to categorically throw kids at home in all situations. I hope, but doubt, that CPS is keeping tabs on the kids who were already red flagged at the schools for being in abusive situations. I do not see how this is going to go well for a lot of at risk kids, and judging by some of the stories posted here earlier this year about CA Family Services/CPS/whatever its called, they already were having a LOT of problems. And now they are all home. With no interaction with the outside world. 😢

You're fine. Dominate away.

I doubt that people who weren't inclined to homeschool will use it as an excuse to start. I did speculate with someone else earlier that I think a few families, if it goes on long enough, who have high powered high schoolers, may find systems that work for them and continue for the sake of continuity, especially in places like California, where there are charter options.

As for the at risk kids. Yes. I'm worried. I also have hoped CPS will be dropping in. And I hope some teachers may as well. I'm not sure what else can be done though.

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Just now, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Services at home type of things they are wanting? 

Yes. Like, the ability to do classes remotely or to work a little more asynchronously. There are definitely people with chronic illness who have asked for that as accommodations and been refused over the years and now we're all doing it. The context is so different, but I can see why it would make people in the disability community ticked. And it's similar to homeschooling in that - like, to the school system this was a horrible idea and suddenly they're all over it. 

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12 minutes ago, Farrar said:

You're fine. Dominate away.

I doubt that people who weren't inclined to homeschool will use it as an excuse to start. I did speculate with someone else earlier that I think a few families, if it goes on long enough, who have high powered high schoolers, may find systems that work for them and continue for the sake of continuity, especially in places like California, where there are charter options.

As for the at risk kids. Yes. I'm worried. I also have hoped CPS will be dropping in. And I hope some teachers may as well. I'm not sure what else can be done though.

I'm seeing it not more not as an excuse to start "homeschooling"- but rather as an excuse to not deal with school. Or homeschooling. People are crazy lazy judging by stories I hear IRL and here on the boards with people who think homeschooling is the easy route. So I do wonder if there isn't a certain % who are going to be "this is nice, not having to do a school run, and deal with car line- we'll just do a couple of worksheets and call it good" type of thing.

Several of the homeschooling entities here are falling over themselves to send out "quick start" guides to homeschooling, which is fine I guess- they're exploiting an opportunity which I get. But I am in a no-reg state, and am not a believer that "everyone should homeschool" and that's where I see the risk. As a longer term homeschooler at this point,  I liked no-regs. Until suddenly everyone now thinks they are 'homeschooling'. Now those threads where we talk about dumbed down curricula are going to be things we wished people would turn too instead of printing off a TPT math and LA worksheets and calling it a day. It's not even unschooling. I don't know what it's going to end up being. I am curious what the school are doing to follow up. I haven't heard a thing on that end here in the media. 

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Here private schools went online today. Some public schools went online, some told the kids to  take a break. My newsfeed is more of where to get free school lunches and which city and county facilities are closed. 

What I hear though is kids unhappy to be coop at home and parents who are working from home aren’t able to pay much attention to work due to whining kids.

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37 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

It's not helping matters that the same media that has been side-eyeing homeschooling for a long time now and pouncing on every "bad homeschooler" story has now suddenly embraced this crack pot, thrown together pretention of "crisis schooling" as a lovely field of flowers to run through. No one is asking questions to the school districts -where'd the microscope go putting everyone under suspicion and screaming for regs?! 

It’s a bit Johnny Come Lately, I think. And in a “oh so NOW you want to talk us up after decades of insulting and demeaning and devaluing what we do?”

 

🙄

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Teachers are struggling to transition here. It’s not easy overnight to go online. Kids are used to being spoon-fed in the classroom and are having hard time with independent work. My friend is complaining and worrying that her kid can’t read sense science textbook (AP Chem) and the lack of FaceTime with teachers will cost her on the test. It’s a mess. Hopefully it will sort itself out soon.

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In my area, the economy dominates headlines besides how many new coronavirus cases or fatalities. 

“Six Bay Area counties have issued a shelter-in-place order, effective at 12:01 a.m. on Tuesday, that will shut down or drastically alter most aspects of public life. Here is what people need to know about the economic impact.

Q: How will the shelter in place order affect the economy? The extraordinary response to the pandemic “is going to put the economy into a recession, if it hasn’t already,” said Sung Won Sohn, a business economist with Loyola Marymount University. “This is a necessary step because health comes first.”

The only question is how deep will the recession be. “In the United States, the spread of the disease is just beginning. This will get worse. To me, this is looking more like an L-shaped recession rather than a V-shaped recession. To the extent we are imposing these somewhat draconian restrictions in the Bay Area, the recession will be shorter than it would have otherwise.”

Scott Anderson, chief economist with bank of the West in San Francisco, said, “all these rolling shutdowns are going to add up to a very sharp drop in Bay Area economic growth. Psychologically it’s doing a lot of damage. It’s going to be a demand shock to consumer spending.”

He expects a U.S. recession will start in March and last until year end, with the second quarter the worst “as people are at home not spending.” Unemployment will rise, but not as high as it did during the great recession. He sees the U.S. rate rising from 3.5% before this started to 6% before it’s over next year.

Sohn said the federal government will need to spend at least $500 billion to help the economy. The good news is, it can borrow that money today at record low interest rates. Much of that money should go to the states. California’s $20 billion “rainy day fund” won’t be enough. That fund comes primarily from tax on capital gains; with the stock market imploding “those gains will be losses.”

The pandemic hit when the economy was in a record expansion. Although consumer debt is high and rising, so are personal savings, so household balance sheets are in strong shape.

Sohn is more worried about business debt. “Unfortunately, low-quality business debt was fastest growing portion of business debt,” he said. Those loans are at high risk in a recession.” https://www.sfchronicle.com/business/article/Bay-Area-coronavirus-shutdown-here-s-where-to-15135505.php

Edited by Arcadia

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I keep telling people that enforced distance learning is nothing like homeschooling.  I homeschooled my older two all the way through, but my youngest has never been homeschooled and is doing everything online now.  But he’s supposed to sign in at certain times, and I don’t get to choose what he does for school, and it’s not flexible at all like homeschooling.  And the responsibility on me isn’t there either.  They both have different advantages and disadvantages.  But I have been a little bemused by the whole thing.

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I'm sort of annoyed that it's being called homeschooling at all.  I've seen comments like: "I don't want to homeschool! " "So don't!  We're going to read and go for hikes and do projects!  Don't homeschool!". Um.  I think they mean they don't want to do school at home. 

I think using the term homeschooling incorrectly devalues a philosophy that I care about.  

I vote people just say "school at home".

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It's the flippancy, my sister in law joked that they're coming to my house to homeschool for 2 weeks. I get it, it's a joke, and I adore my niece and nephew, but also, I've poured thousands of hours into this, it's not a joke or a whim. I don't call myself a  PA because I answer dh's phone or an event organiser because I threw a birthday party or a nurse because I applied a bandaid...

And yes, being side eyed as weirdos for a decade, it's a bit rich to read all these positive 'revolutionary' articles 🙄

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I wish people would set aside the idea that they need to "school at home" or "homeschool" or "crisis school" their kids right now.   

I do admit that my teacher cousin posting a smart little schedule of how she will homeschool her kids made me roll my eyes.  A few years ago, she publicly bit my head off about how HER children were going to get a high quality education with an appropriately trained teacher, blah blah blah.  Today she's posting a schedule that has yoga, play time, "math talk", snack time, "recess", art time, board games, and only a smidgen of butt-in-seat written work. 

It's taking every part of me to not ask "But what about socialization?"

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I had a few people text me for advice and resources for homeschooling. Honestly, it felt really good to be able to talk them through some stuff and give a little advice (not the advice I'd give for someone truly looking to hs, but advice for people forced into it temporarily). It is a really small way to help people and it is one of the few things making stuff weigh a little less heavily on my mind.

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I think this will have a detrimental effect on people's perception of homeschooling. This is chaotic and stressful. All the homeschoolers I know are calmly proceeding with their lessons, albeit feeling a little isolated due to canceled outside activities. 

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5 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Lastly (sorry to dominate your thread Farrar)- am I the only one concerned that some people are going to use this as an excuse to pull their kids and then either do nothing, or take advantage of the situation as so many of the abusive parents seem to have done in those spotlight media cases? This just seems beyond nuts to categorically throw kids at home in all situations. I hope, but doubt, that CPS is keeping tabs on the kids who were already red flagged at the schools for being in abusive situations. I do not see how this is going to go well for a lot of at risk kids, and judging by some of the stories posted here earlier this year about CA Family Services/CPS/whatever its called, they already were having a LOT of problems. And now they are all home. With no interaction with the outside world. 😢

This has DEFINITELY been on my mind, as someone trying to get kids out of foster care right now! Kids who flew under the radar for years on end, and seem to have been removed in big part due to information from teachers/school.

Also, for whatever it’s worth, families providing foster care right now did NOT sign up for potentially months of homeschooling. I don’t doubt many are calling caseworkers asking for moves, or that potential families are refusing placements. 

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7 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

crying into their vessels of alcohol because the kids are home for a month with no camps to pack them off too.

Same. A lot of parents who are talking about how bad their kids are if they aren't busy, so now they have to """homeschool""" them all day. 

People have asked me for advice but all they want is online programs and super basic parenting stuff. Like how to say "hey don't hit each other" in a way that actually makes the kids not hit each other. I don't know, man, maybe just say that then get up and make sure they stop?

My overall impression is that a lot of people don't like their kids or spending time with them.

Some were hesitant but quickly got on a board and are now enjoying their little ones. But they didn't ask my advice 🙂 

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5 hours ago, happi duck said:

I think using the term homeschooling incorrectly devalues a philosophy that I care about.  

 

❤️ So much, yes!!

It has all made me feel really sad and weird.

I  suspect that on the back end of this, things will be changing for homeschoolers in some way because allllll these people will be saying that they homeschooled for a while. As if they have some deep experience with it and therefore can speak to it intelligently. And look, a small minority of people probably will. I guarantee you there's some elated mothers who wanted to homeschool, whose husbands were against it and for SOME 🙄 reason got to cast the deciding vote and pack the kids off to B&M school ... who might be able to continue homeschooling next year if it goes well now. But for most people that absolutely will not be the case, but people are already calling themselves homeschoolers. I don't like it. 

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[sorry to serial post, my internet connection is being weird and if I don't do it in bits and bobs everything gets lost]

 

I keep telling my friends, who are just trying to adjust well, that their kids CAN NOT "fall behind." There's some obstruction in the way preventing them from believing me. But all the kids in their classes will be in the same- or a worse- boat. The notion of "behind" is absolutely freaking them out.  They don't seem to understand that the benchmarks were all relatively arbitrary to begin with, and their whole cohort is going through the same thing. 

I understand that they don't want the summer-vacation-phenomenon twice over, but honestly in elementary school, just chill out. Type "subtraction practice" or whatever into the google if you're worried. Or ask a specific question like "how can I help him with subtraction" of us seasoned teachers, homeschool or otherwise! That would be so much better than the expectation that you're going to  upload the collected wisdom of homeschoolers over the weekend and be a homeschooler on Monday. 

Edited by OKBud
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This is not homeschooling- which is an intentional choice. And it is not school- so packets and busywork really aren't teaching kids anything and parents aren't being called in to sit with their kids and teach them math. Plus-a huge part of school is, in fact, group socialization.

Online classes sometimes work well- often they don't. There will be a wide variety of quality in education even across districts.

Seniors in high school this year should just get a pass/fail grade on their current classes.  That would sort out a group that is devasted for their social events- prom, graduation, spring sports, musicals, other perfomances. Just pass them, graduate them and focus on the upcoming classes. That would free up kids to work, enlist, etc.

Actually everyone should just get pass/fail for the year.  If everyone does it- it doesn't hurt anyone- just an asterisk on a transcript. 2020- all spring classes pass/fail.

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Not to be a grump, but the idea that most parents, who have been suddenly thrust into 2-3 months of at-home time, will successfully pull off the role of teacher—be it homeschool teacher or B&M— is silly.  I understand it gives people a direction to focus right now, but you asked.  😉

Not to mention, kids probably don't need mom or dad play-acting a role which prevents them from evaluating the very real emotional stress this transition will bring for their kids. 
I have such appreciationfor parents who can look at the situation and say, “This isnt going to be life as normal.  Let’s set up some order for our days and see how things go”  Thats more of a homeschool take than all the schooly stuff I see mentioned lately!
 

 

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I'm trying to tell people to keep in mind that this isn't normal for us homeschoolers, either.  We don't normally homeschool in an atmosphere that looks like an episode of The Walking Dead, ok?  Everything is usually open - co-ops, museums, sports, activities, libraries....  We don't just sit at home in fear all day and never leave.  

Also, with all the articles about "welcome to homeschooling", etc....most of the families we know who's kids are home from ps have absolutely no intention of homeschooling or working with their kids on academics over the break.  So, the articles seem weird to me!  

Edited by Evanthe
I went comma crazy.
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You know my other least favorite part of this?! My Mother, who spent the first three years of us homeschooling being highly critical and suspicious of the whole thing now forwarding me every “free activities/curricula/school programs” list that hits the local news. And trust me. There are a LOT. It’s like being forwarded Pinterest as a whole. 
 

Thanks Mom, but I’ve kind of got this down 7 years later. 😂 

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59 minutes ago, Evanthe said:

I'm trying to tell people to keep in mind that this isn't normal for us homeschoolers, either.  We don't normally homeschool in an atmosphere that looks like an episode of The Walking Dead, ok?  Everything is usually open - co-ops, museums, sports, activities, libraries....  We don't just sit at home in fear all day and never leave.  

 

It took the public schools to make the stereotype come to life! 😂

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10 hours ago, Farrar said:

But there's something about it all that chafes me that I'm having trouble pinpointing.

Perhaps that it isn't really homeschooling?

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10 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

It's not helping matters that the same media that has been side-eyeing homeschooling for a long time now and pouncing on every "bad homeschooler" story has now suddenly embraced this crack pot, thrown together pretention of "crisis schooling" as a lovely field of flowers to run through. No one is asking questions to the school districts -where'd the microscope go putting everyone under suspicion and screaming for regs?! 

This - and it would be one thing if when this all over they would be more accepting of homeschooling, but you know once the kids are back in school they will go back to side-eyeing us.

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My mom told me that my sister had Day 1 of Homeschooling yesterday. She's taking care of my brother's three kids since school is closed there.

I know my sister's heart is in the right place and that she is using humor (since those kids are a handful). I passed along the free Facebook stuff I've heard about. She isn't the kind to print out worksheets or I'd pass along the free Beast Academy stuff...

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I had a FB friend/acquaintance from long ago post "Veteran Homeschoolers, give me your best programs or materials to use".  One person just tagged another person, that person just said Classical Conversations, and I wrote a long post giving her advice suited to the daughter's age, possible interests, and variety of materials that could be used for a 3-8 week period.  And no acknowledgement, thank you, nothing.  I have a feeling she was just hoping she could drop her daughter into some online program mid year and call it good.

This is definitely not homeschooling for most I fear. It's a weird combination of stress of falling behind, being cooped up with no social outlet, and the fear of the unknown.  

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Locally, I'm not seeing anyone call it homeschooling.  The school district is calling it e-schooling.  If anything, it will be a litmus test for families who were considering the public e-schooling option for next year.  If the emergency model set up for students who regularly attend the physical schools works for their families, they will choose to enroll their children in e-school for next school year.  If it doesn't work, they will have their children return to the classroom as soon as possible.  

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32 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

You know my other least favorite part of this?! My Mother, who spent the first three years of us homeschooling being highly critical and suspicious of the whole thing now forwarding me every “free activities/curricula/school programs” list that hits the local news. And trust me. There are a LOT. It’s like being forwarded Pinterest as a whole. 
 

Thanks Mom, but I’ve kind of got this down 7 years later. 😂 

That’s because you aren’t homeschooling for free so your mom is forwarding you freebies 😂

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Some families here have both parents working from home. It’s hard to hire a babysitter at short notice now because they are mainly elderly people. The younger people tend to hustle by walking dogs. If these elderly babysitters aren’t babysitting grandchildren, I don’t think we (in general) are supposed to hire them because they are on the high risk to get infected by others group.

Edited by Arcadia

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Schools are on Spring Break here, and the Governor only cancelled school through the end of the month, so while some parents are preparing for a longer shutdown, most are just treating this as Spring Break and looking for things to do now. Disney movie marathons, popcorn, and bouncing on air tracks and backyard trampolines are ruling my feed right now (admittedly, most of the parents of younger kids I'm friends with who aren't homeschoolers have kids who cheer....).  We have so many food insecure kids in my area that I'm not sure a longer shutdown will really be viable-food banks, etc are already stretched thin due to a combination of a lack of donations (due to churches shutting down, schools not doing food drives, etc) and volunteers to distribute them.

 

I've posted my message that I'm willing to help parents find resources or provide limited online tutoring and support-and one reason is that I know a LOT of local homeschoolers depend on tutorials to teach subjects, so they are just as adrift with everything closed as the PS parents are-maybe more, since the tutorials are often less set up to provide online classes/flipped classrooms than the public schools. And, to be honest, I can use a project to keep me busy, because otherwise I will tend to obsess and stress, too.

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My neighbor told DH that now she will be “homeschooling her DD for the next to weeks.” Her DD is in kindergarten. I like my neighbor, we actually get along quite well, both being outsiders in this small town, but really. Homeschooling? It’s kindergarten! You are just living! Heaven forbid you have to read a book with your child.

Also, what gets to me about the people worrying about having their kids home and having to actually be in the same house with them is the fact they say as much in front of their kids. What does that tell their children? I would have felt horrible if my mother had said something like that about me. I had to run a few errands yesterday and heard it twice, in front of children.

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1 hour ago, MarieCurie said:

This - and it would be one thing if when this all over they would be more accepting of homeschooling, but you know once the kids are back in school they will go back to side-eyeing us.

And saying, “It’s not so hard. We all did it that month (or however long). I don’t see what the big deal is. You really do just watch TV all day!”

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5 minutes ago, Ema said:

My neighbor told DH that now she will be “homeschooling her DD for the next to weeks.” Her DD is in kindergarten. I like my neighbor, we actually get along quite well, both being outsiders in this small town, but really. Homeschooling? It’s kindergarten! You are just living! Heaven forbid you have to read a book with your child.

Also, what gets to me about the people worrying about having their kids home and having to actually be in the same house with them is the fact they say as much in front of their kids. What does that tell their children? I would have felt horrible if my mother had said something like that about me. I had to run a few errands yesterday and heard it twice, in front of children.

I think some pity toward people whose entire way of life has been disrupted would be warranted. Their jobs are important to them, and they're anxious if they are laid off or are working from home with kids at home. The children's schools are important to the parents AND to the children. Isolation with kids at home is a scary and frequently unhealthy thing that they'll have to work through. To me, these concerns are apart from the question of whether homework packets and storytime should be called homeschooling -- these are very real issues and it would go better for the nation if we don't look down on people whose challenges are different from ours. 

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9 minutes ago, Lang Syne Boardie said:

I think some pity toward people whose entire way of life has been disrupted would be warranted. Their jobs are important to them, and they're anxious if they are laid off or are working from home with kids at home. 

People are filing unemployment paperwork now. The California governor waive the waiting period. (ETA: some dental offices have opt to close too for shelter in place)

https://www.edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019.htm

“Reduced Work Hours 

If your employer has reduced your hours or shut down operations due to COVID-19, you can file an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim. UI provides partial wage replacement benefit payments to workers who lose their job or have their hours reduced, through no fault of their own. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to COVID-19 and expected to return to work with their employer within a few weeks are not required to actively seek work each week. However, they must remain able and available and ready to work during their unemployment for each week of benefits claimed and meet all other eligibility criteria. Eligible individuals can receive benefits that range from $40-$450 per week.

The Governor’s Executive Order waives the one-week unpaid waiting period, so you can collect UI benefits for the first week you are out of work. If you are eligible, the EDD processes and issues payments within a few weeks of receiving a claim.”

Edited by Arcadia

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@Arcadia, yes, the states are doing all they can and I'm sure we are all grateful. Unemployment isn't enough to pay the bills, for most families, and it doesn't fix the problems of being at home with children when a family is accustomed to jobs and schools, but again, it's something to be thankful for while waiting for Congress to pass relief aid.

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I really don't mind about what term people use during this time of uncertainty. TBH, I think "homeschool" is kind of a lame word anyway. If having a label helps families cope in this crazy time, then use whatever term seems to relieve the stress a little.

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I've not seen anyone call what is happening homeschooling either.  K-2 parents received packets for their students as well as links and resources to supplement at home.  Perhaps that is the closest to actual homeschool?  3rd grade on up are all received Chromebooks and they have class schedules and work that will be assigned.  They are calling it e-learning.  I am more familiar with what they are doing in the high school and they have a schedule of eight 25 minute periods of instruction with corresponding assignments assigned.  My son even received a keyboard to take home for his music theory class.  Classes like gym or culinary that were a mix of written assignments and hands on will be using videos to replace some of the hands on which is a bummer.  Labs as well I believe.  It starts tomorrow so I am unsure how everything will work but I definitely know I wouldn't say I'm homeschooling them.

The problem I'm seeing is like with everything, there are parents who have absolutely no idea what is going on and they are the most vocal.  Ok this is just a vent, but we've received countless e-mails, texts phone calls and surveys about this whole process on a daily basis and have been for weeks.  Every few a days a parent posts something on Facebook basically stating they have no idea what is happening or that they weren't informed.  It is maddening because I know some of the people complaining.  They are involved parents so how they don't have this information is beyond me.  Every time the superintendent sends a message I get it via my home phone, my work phone, my cell phone, I also get a text and e-mails to my home and work.  It is posted to the school Website, their Instagram page and their Facebook page.  Then it is reposted by the Booster club, the PTO  and half the parents in the school.  

Also I think there is confusion about the 180 day waiver here as well.  School was supposed to end June 9th.  We are currently scheduled to be closed two weeks well till March 30th) and will still have to make up the two weeks at the end of the year we just can't go past June 30th.  The waiver means that once we hit June 30th we can stop having to make up days even if we haven't hit 180.  So basically schools closed for two weeks are just on an extended spring break and students wouldn't need to make anything up or even need to do school at this time.  Our district chose e-learning because those days count as days that do not have to be made up at the end of the year.

Now of course other parts of the country are handling things completely differently but this is basically what is happening in most schools in my area.  and if the closures are extended past the two weeks that could completely change the game.

 

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50 minutes ago, Lang Syne Boardie said:

I think some pity toward people whose entire way of life has been disrupted would be warranted. Their jobs are important to them, and they're anxious if they are laid off or are working from home with kids at home. The children's schools are important to the parents AND to the children. Isolation with kids at home is a scary and frequently unhealthy thing that they'll have to work through. To me, these concerns are apart from the question of whether homework packets and storytime should be called homeschooling -- these are very real issues and it would go better for the nation if we don't look down on people whose challenges are different from ours. 

Well my neighbor stays at home with her 4 year old. Not looking down, just saying, as others on here, you cannot call it homeschooling.

As for the other people, dude, I get it. I desperately want a break from my kids at times. But, if you read it the way it I was meant to be, my problem is when they say stuff like that in front of their children. Goodness knows I know their lives are disrupted and it will be hard, but don’t make it harder on your children by saying that you won’t be able to stand having them home in front of them! 

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I posted this on my Facebook page preemptively last week. Several homeschooling friends have shared it.

(This has been reposted and is now sharable with the public.)

Parents of school aged kids facing quarantine,

If you're forced to e-school at some point due to school closures, please don't think you'll know what homeschooling is like. Most homeschoolers don't stay at home all week. They regularly have group classes and activities out of their homes that people in quarantined areas will not have: libraries, museums, cooperatives, service organizations, paid classes (PE, academics, extra curricular activities,) and large support and social groups that meet at public parks and other places. These are in addition to hanging out with neighbor kids and place of worship youth activities.

If you don't like the quality, the teaching techniques, and or the content of the e-schooling curriculum you're required to use, know that homeschoolers have many dozens of curriculum options in every subject and every educational philosophy you've ever heard of and many you haven't heard of. We can change whatever isn't working; you won't be allowed to.

The same with working from home. We've done that since our now 20 something daughters were an infant and toddler. We parented with working at home and homeschooling in mind. We chose it, planned for it, and made changes to accommodate it. There's a transition period for that, and when we figured out the house we had at the time made it more challenging, we moved; you'll be stuck.

Your experience just won't be anything like homeschooling and working from home by choice. You'll be schooling at home and working at home in quarantined isolation. I'm sorry for anyone stuck with an educational and or work environment they didn't choose. I wouldn't like it if something other than what I wanted was forced on me.

Edited by Homeschool Mom in AZ
post sugery meds
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5 hours ago, OKBud said:

Same. A lot of parents who are talking about how bad their kids are if they aren't busy, so now they have to """homeschool""" them all day. 

People have asked me for advice but all they want is online programs and super basic parenting stuff. Like how to say "hey don't hit each other" in a way that actually makes the kids not hit each other. I don't know, man, maybe just say that then get up and make sure they stop?

My overall impression is that a lot of people don't like their kids or spending time with them.

Some were hesitant but quickly got on a board and are now enjoying their little ones. But they didn't ask my advice 🙂 

 

What?  You expect parents to get up and actually parent?    😂

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