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Ktgrok

church and Covid19

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3 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:


You can’t get more biblical than Jesus specifically saying he did not come to do away with the law, but to fulfill it.  Jesus had no issue with the law.  His issue was with people perverting the law to suit their own desires. He actually preached love and grace and law.  People walked away bc he told them the law and they didn’t like it  He did not change the law to whatever would make it easier.

I can have compassion and love for the struggles of my fellows without agreeing with them.

 
I think it came across just fine.  She is free to be honest and I am free to honestly explain why I think she is wrong in that stance.

Love is not dependent on agreement or acceptance of opinions.

I am sorry, I was trying to only quote Traveling Chris and I really shouldn't have done that.  I try to leave stuff alone, because I really am not a great online communicator.

Edited by SilverBrook

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The president of our synod just put out a message basically encouraging folks to proceed with caution, not fear, and with love for their neighbors and respect and prayer for local government. All of which I agree with.

I'm not sure how this plays out in our individual congregation. On the one hand, my family is all currently well, with no reason to think we have been exposed to anything. And we are scheduled on Sunday for roles others will have to fill if we are absent. OTOH, we have a LOT of vulnerable elderly folks in our congregation and I honestly think it would be best for them to take a hiatus for a weekend or two. But I seriously doubt that will happen. Like others have mentioned, I'm seeing a lot of scoffing in my denomination and equating caution with "giving in to fear" and lacking faith. It makes me sad. 

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9 minutes ago, SilverBrook said:

I am sorry, I was trying to only quote Traveling Chris and I really shouldn't have done that.  I try to leave stuff alone, because I really am not a great online communicator.


I think you communicated just fine too. 🙂  It’s all okay. I’m really not cranky or anything. Just discussing. 

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2 hours ago, Heatherwith4 said:

I just saw a fb post from our church that basically sounds like they aren’t cancelling anything.  I am pretty much livid.  We are talking thousands of people every Sunday.  

Our church just canceled all church and non church activities in our church building for the month- except the preschool will be folliowing  Huntsville schools.  Randolph already went online.

My church will film services with just the pastors probably

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One of our pastors and several other church members have the virus. Everything is cancelled. The building is closed. 

The church where my AHG troop meets has closed their building. 

 

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My parents' church is continuing with regular services, but their attendance is so low I am pretty sure they can keep good social distancing.  Mom said they are going to be serving communion in individually wrapped packets like these.  The ushers are supposed to use hand sanitizer before serving, but mom isn't very confident that that is enough, so she is going to be skipping for a while until things settle down.  My brother has chosen to stay home altogether from church services for a while because he is immune-compromised.  He is a school teacher and very glad that they are closing the schools here.

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Our church decided tonight that given today's announcement of a state of emergency here, all services will be cancelled for an indefinite period of time.  They'll be available online.

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Our church has canceled everything except Sunday services. Typical attendance is probably around 100 on a Sunday morning, less in the evening service. They are asking that people stay home if they are at all sick, so since DH and I both have colds (just regular colds!), our family will be home tomorrow. Assuming we do go next weekend, we will make sure that our family is not sitting close to anyone else. 

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On 3/13/2020 at 3:42 AM, Bootsie said:

 

A colleague in China said that Hubei province suffered so dramatically because people rushed to the hospital in a panic, making it difficult to triage and care for those who really needed it.  Having lived through this in China he says that he is not convinced that quarantine is the best in that it can result in deaths in other ways (which the statistics do not pick up).  He says that the main thing is not to stir panic.

 

well, there were at least two in china that I know about.  some idiot decided to break quarantine - and killed two guards to do it.  Knowing china - he'll probably be executed making it three deaths from "other ways".

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Yesterday, our church posted a graphic on their FB page that said, "Worry about nothing, pray about everything." I'm guessing services are not cancelled. 

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Our services are definitely still on. Not sure how I feel about that.

We are 100% on board with self-isolating in the interest of protecting those around us. But what good does that do if a large percentage of the community isn't participating? It's the same with things like the TP shortage: we purposely didn't buy TP early in the week when we shopped because we didn't need any at the moment and didn't want to contribute to causing a shortage. But now, although we are still fine for the time being, there isn't a square to spare in our town. Hopefully a shipment arrives before we run out.

When dh asked about services, our pastor (whom I dearly love, don't get me wrong) quoted the commandment about the Sabbath to him. But what about the commandment against murder? Our catechism interprets that as a prohibition against doing anything that will hurt or harm our neighbor's body. Christians have historically been known as those who are willing to rush in to aid others in a crisis, even at risk to their own life and limb. But what happens when the best possible way we can help is to STAY AWAY? I don't like the insinuation that those of us who are trying to help by self-isolating (or as one of the memes in the other thread put it, being exiled for the good of the realm 😆) are just giving in to panic and fear. I am not afraid for myself or even my kids; I just want to protect my neighbor. How does that make me a bad Christian?

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We go to church regularly (25 years) that has in attendance in person on any given Sunday approx 2500 people, maybe 3000.  That's in the sanctuary.  That does not include the other buildings for preschool, kids, middle and high school.  Folks greet others positioned nearby with a handshake many times.  Our pastor advised no touching right now.   And, he did cancel services for tomorrow, Sunday.  He'll go and preach from the pulpit and our choir will be present but the congregation has been told to not come to the church campus b/c the doors will be locked.  The service will be live-streamed tomorrow.  Well, it has been every Sunday for awhile as we have people from around the world who "attend" via on-line services.   So, we'll have "church service" but not in our church "building" tomorrow.  Who knows if that will carry over in the weeks ahead.  Our local school district is advancing spring break from mid-April to now include 2 teacher work days March 19 and 20 and spring break March 23 - 27.   

What a mess!  

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I wish our church would cancel. I feel like there is a lack of real concern for what is going on. I also feel like my family has to go if services are on, because we have various responsibilities. 😞 And I don't want to go.

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This is the official statement from our metopolitan: https://antiochian.org/regulararticle/619

I'm OK with it.  Our parish has about 80 people, very few old people and our state has only 1 case so far.

I haven't been attending any of the Lenten services because I can't figure out if I have allergies or the longest-lasting cold in history (allergy meds only take care of like 75% of it). 

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17 hours ago, ScoutTN said:

One of our pastors and several other church members have the virus. Everything is cancelled. The building is closed. 

The church where my AHG troop meets has closed their building. 

 

I'm so sorry to hear this!!

our church has cancelled all services and all activities, which I think is wise since we have an older population which is at risk. Some are gathering in small groups in their homes, but I don't think we will even do that because of  my mom's fragile health. I don't want to risk giving her something.

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2 hours ago, Jaybee said:

I wish our church would cancel. I feel like there is a lack of real concern for what is going on. I also feel like my family has to go if services are on, because we have various responsibilities. 😞 And I don't want to go.

(hugs)

I teach kids who often attend while ill (after class: "how'd Johnny do?  He was throwing up last night.").  I was honestly relieved when our bishop cancelled.

It really truly isn't fear to not meet in person!  The church can be clever about this and "meet" other ways.

More (hugs)

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My diocese finally posted a statement, and it is NOT good enough. we have multiple cases in this diocese! They could totally suspend communion services and go to morning prayer instead - that was the norm for many many many decades if not centuries within the Episcopal/Anglican tradition. There is ZERO reason not to do that now. Ridiculous. And they aren't even stopping the common cup. http://www.cfdiocese.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Coronavirus-Communion-and-the-Diocese-of-Central-Florida-3-4-20.pdf

 

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3 hours ago, PeachyDoodle said:

Our services are definitely still on. Not sure how I feel about that.

We are 100% on board with self-isolating in the interest of protecting those around us. But what good does that do if a large percentage of the community isn't participating? It's the same with things like the TP shortage: we purposely didn't buy TP early in the week when we shopped because we didn't need any at the moment and didn't want to contribute to causing a shortage. But now, although we are still fine for the time being, there isn't a square to spare in our town. Hopefully a shipment arrives before we run out.

When dh asked about services, our pastor (whom I dearly love, don't get me wrong) quoted the commandment about the Sabbath to him. But what about the commandment against murder? Our catechism interprets that as a prohibition against doing anything that will hurt or harm our neighbor's body. Christians have historically been known as those who are willing to rush in to aid others in a crisis, even at risk to their own life and limb. But what happens when the best possible way we can help is to STAY AWAY? I don't like the insinuation that those of us who are trying to help by self-isolating (or as one of the memes in the other thread put it, being exiled for the good of the realm 😆) are just giving in to panic and fear. I am not afraid for myself or even my kids; I just want to protect my neighbor. How does that make me a bad Christian?

I'd be quoting some choice passages right back! Starting with love thy neighbor, hitting on what you do for the least of these (like self isolate!!), and ending on the sabbath being made for man, not man for the sabbath. Ugh. 

Edited by Ktgrok
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7 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

they aren't even stopping the common cup

My church didn't want to, the bishop made them. So! Weird! 

 

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3 hours ago, PeachyDoodle said:

the insinuation that those of us who are trying to help by self-isolating

Our bishop has been very clear that we are not to judge the motives or reasons of others in attending or not attending.  "Not judging another"-- I think I've read that somewhere before....now who was it that said that? :::hmmmm:::  The bishop also said that we had to be careful to live into love and not stigmatize those who do end up ill, and to find ways to keep in community as much as we can.   Our parish and general area have cancelled almost all the services except Divine Liturgy--and that is saying a lot, considering that it is Lent--and we are small in number and can do the social distancing (especially given that so many will be absent for the foreseeable future).

I'm always tempted to show off how strong and healthy I am.  I want to go to church just to show I CAN!  I'm so STRONG!  The fact is, I am in the target group (60+, immuno-compromised) and so maybe it is time for me to just be obedient and just stay home.  And say my prayers.

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18 minutes ago, Patty Joanna said:

I'm always tempted to show off how strong and healthy I am.  I want to go to church just to show I CAN!  I'm so STRONG!  The fact is, I am in the target group (60+, immuno-compromised) and so maybe it is time for me to just be obedient and just stay home.  And say my prayers.

I think I'm being over-sensitive. I am sure our pastor meant to comforting, not judgmental. But I do think there is a lot of this going on too. I suppose it's human nature to want to be the one who is strong and brave and bold. And sometimes that is the right thing to do. I think of the stories of clergy and people of faith in past pandemics who nursed the sick and cared for the dying and bereaved spiritually without a thought for their own well-being. And that is truly admirable. But those were times when people did not have the knowledge and capacity to prevent those people from becoming sick in the first place. Saving someone from a burning building is brave; lighting the house on fire in an attempt to keep the inhabitants warm is just reckless.

ETA: But I'm still frustrated because it seems like our staying home for a Sunday or two will do nothing to keep others safe when everybody else is going about business as usual. But I suppose I can only be responsible for my own actions and answer to my own conscience.

Edited by PeachyDoodle
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Update - I posted our congregation’s previous email, and they’ve reassessed and decided to go ahead and cancel the in person tomorrow morning and for the next few weeks as well, since more guidance came down from the governor about the current situation here locally.

I appreciate them being humble and responsive the how fluid the situation is!  We were emailed livestream instructions for tomorrow morning and the smaller home gatherings are still meeting as people are able 🙂

 

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Our church (conservative Protestant, liturgical) doesn't do video, so the pastor sent home a very nice liturgy for home worship, complete with both piano music and guitar chords for the hymns. Parts to read or lead for several people. Looking forward to a relaxed morning and a sweet family worship time.  

Here is a link if anyone could use a resource. The service begins on p.3. 

Edited by ScoutTN
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1 hour ago, PeachyDoodle said:

I think of the stories of clergy and people of faith in past pandemics who nursed the sick and cared for the dying and bereaved spiritually without a thought for their own well-being.

This is different.  They are doing good.  I would be doing no good to anyone else...just prideful...to attend.  My joke is that I want to go so no one thinks I am over 60.   :::cue chuckles:::   There is a grain (or a gallon) of truth in humor though...   

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Just sent this email to my church. I'm still so upset about this. We have a large portion of our congregatin that is elderly! And they are not only canceling, they are keeping the common cup, keeping communion where people kneel side by side in inches of each other, etc. I'm flabbergasted. 

I appreciate that St. Michael's does not want to encourage a spirit of fear. But after reading the letter you have sent, and watching the Bishop's video, i'm very concerned that the church is going to become a vector of transmission. At this point, we know that the virus is spread via droplets, which may travel up to 6 ft. Which means just sitting within that distance of a person, or kneeling within that distance of them at the communion rail, or being that near while filing into or out of the building, is close enough for transmission. The initial evidence also shows that it can live on hard surfaces, like pews, pencils in the pews, the plate that is passed from person to person, etc for up to several days. And most concerning, there is evidence that those with no symptoms at all are able to spread the virus, and may in fact have a higher viral load and be more able to spread it than those that are symptomatic. So just asking the sick to stay home, and for people to maybe not shake hands, is still providing plenty of ways for it to spread within the congregation, and for those people to then take it home and spread it throughout the community at large. 

Again, I understand that we should not be fearful. But we are also called to love our neighbor. We are our brother's keeper. We must care for the least of these. And we do not care for them, or love them, by gathering together in close quarters during a pandemic. We all want to gather, to worship, to receive the body and blood, but I can't help but feel that the harder option - to limit social contact as much as possible -  is the right one, the loving one, the Christian one. There is SO much misinformation being spread, and some of the most vulnerable to this illness - the elderly - are also the least savvy when it comes to evaluating things they hear and see on social media. They are relying on their pastors, their shepherd, to lead them, to advise them. And yet the church has not said that those at risk should stay home, or that we all should, in order to protect our brothers and sisters in Christ. 
I'd love to see the church send out information on how to pray the daily office at home, how to watch the service from home, or at the very least to move to morning prayer instead of a communion. Many many churches are doing these kinds of things, to protect the vulnerable. 
 
I realize that you have many competing considerations, but I felt the need to say something, out of concern for the community. 
 
I'll be praying for you, and the parish, and the church as a whole
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This just came from my priest.  It's from the head of the Orthodox Church in America:    "Everyone in the parish or mission, other than the priest(s) (and deacon(s)), a reader, a server, and a limited number of chanters or singers (all of whom are physically strong and at low risk for COVID-19), is encouraged to remain at home, even at the time of the Divine Liturgy."  

All other services and programs are cancelled except Sunday liturgies and Weds. Lenten liturgies.   Everyone is encouraged to watch services via live-stream.  

Edited by PrincessMommy
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Okay, I know I am harping here, so y'all feel free to put me on Ignore (temporarily or otherwise 😄 ). I just don't have anywhere else I feel I can say these things right now.

Now the argument I'm seeing everywhere is "we have to obey God rather than man." Which I don't get AT. ALL. In my state at least, we haven't been ordered not to worship God, or to do or not do anything else. The governor has ASKED us to refrain from gathering in large groups in order to protect the most vulnerable among us. It's called a ban, but I mean really, it's not like the SWAT team is going to bust through the church doors tomorrow morning and start counting heads.

Even though I belong to a denomination that is highly liturgical, and emphasizes the importance of meeting together and receiving God's gifts of Word and sacrament regularly, and even though I believe in all those things AND am also a pretty staunch libertarian, I can't for the life of me figure out how a temporary, voluntary hiatus is so egregious as to constitute sinful disobedience to God. Especially when technology allows for us to continue to do a lot (not all) of the things we currently do.

The more I read, the more it appears that a certain subset of people seem to view this virus and its attendant response as some kind of conspiracy to stir up panic for... some reason I can't name? So I guess I shouldn't be surprised they react this way if they see a power grab lurking around every corner. 

I need the old /rant off/ emoji back!

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2 hours ago, PeachyDoodle said:

Okay, I know I am harping here, so y'all feel free to put me on Ignore (temporarily or otherwise 😄 ). I just don't have anywhere else I feel I can say these things right now.

Now the argument I'm seeing everywhere is "we have to obey God rather than man." Which I don't get AT. ALL. In my state at least, we haven't been ordered not to worship God, or to do or not do anything else. The governor has ASKED us to refrain from gathering in large groups in order to protect the most vulnerable among us. It's called a ban, but I mean really, it's not like the SWAT team is going to bust through the church doors tomorrow morning and start counting heads.

Even though I belong to a denomination that is highly liturgical, and emphasizes the importance of meeting together and receiving God's gifts of Word and sacrament regularly, and even though I believe in all those things AND am also a pretty staunch libertarian, I can't for the life of me figure out how a temporary, voluntary hiatus is so egregious as to constitute sinful disobedience to God. Especially when technology allows for us to continue to do a lot (not all) of the things we currently do.

The more I read, the more it appears that a certain subset of people seem to view this virus and its attendant response as some kind of conspiracy to stir up panic for... some reason I can't name? So I guess I shouldn't be surprised they react this way if they see a power grab lurking around every corner. 

I need the old /rant off/ emoji back!

Sometimes I really struggle with my desire to be in church and receive the Mysteries and staying home.  In our tradition we believe that the Eucharist is life-giving and for the "healing of soul and body".   But, as one wise older lady said this week, "I know that communion is life-giving, but I don't have the same confidence in those around me."   

There's also a Russian proverb that goes, "Pray but keep rowing."   I think this pertains to this situation too... we should definitely continue to pray and keep our faith, but we should also be wise and heed the warnings.  We shouldn't just do one OR the other.  

Edited by PrincessMommy
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1 hour ago, PrincessMommy said:

This just came from my priest.  It's from the head of the Orthodox Church in America:    "Everyone in the parish or mission, other than the priest(s) (and deacon(s)), a reader, a server, and a limited number of chanters or singers (all of whom are physically strong and at low risk for COVID-19), is encouraged to remain at home, even at the time of the Divine Liturgy."  

All other services and programs are cancelled except Sunday liturgies and Weds. Lenten liturgies.   Everyone is encouraged to watch services via live-stream.  

I don't think this is for the entire OCA. I think this is just the Diocese of the South. 

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Just got back from church. It's still on but will be decided week by week. It was fairly quiet, probably near half the congregation missing  Playgroup held at church is cancelled. Our homeschool group is held there fortnightly and I don't know what the plan is for that yet (my decision, which I'll make next week)

For now what they've decided to do is:

Cancel morning tea/coffee/biscuits after the service. An updated cleaning plan. Door greeters make sure you get hand sanitizer on the way in. Social distancing etc. One of our congregants is a doctor and gave a talk, honestly she is more worried than I would have liked...

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Well, things have evolved rapidly. The archbishop issued a dispensation lifting the Sunday Mass obligation. Our parochial vicar did a youtube video strongly requesting anyone elderly or immune compromised stay home. They won't be passing the collection baskets, the holy water fonts have been drained, there will be no sign of peace and if you want to receive communion in your mouth you must wait until the end of the line. He even gave a very decent explanation of flattening the curve. That's a big turnaround from Thursday.

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20 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

I don't think this is for the entire OCA. I think this is just the Diocese of the South. 

This came from my priest via Met. Tikhon.  I'm in the DC metro area.   I had heard at Vespers that the South was doing this.  When I got home our priest had sent out a parish-wide email with Met. Tikhon's directive.   I assume Met. Tikhon is instituting this for the entire US.  I could be wrong though - Met. Tikhon is technically our bishop.   So it could just be for our Archdiocese.  

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What I think some churches are not getting, is that just sitting next to someone in a pew, or touching a pew someone else breathed on earlier in the day, or being in line for communion, is a risk of transmission. 

You can sanitize your hands at the door on the way in, then touch your eyes or nose before you hit the pew, then touch the pew as you manuver in, then the person behind you does the same, and voila. 

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15 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

This came from my priest via Met. Tikhon.  I'm in the DC metro area.   I had heard at Vespers that the South was doing this.  When I got home our priest had sent out a parish-wide email with Met. Tikhon's directive.   I assume Met. Tikhon is instituting this for the entire US.  I could be wrong though - Met. Tikhon is technically our bishop.   So it could just be for our Archdiocese.  

Thanks for the clarification. I haven't seen anything from our bishop about this. I'm in the Diocese of the West. 

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We have community transmission in our county so we've gone completely online. It's gonna be weird.

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I am in a setting right now that is very far removed from my everyday life as an American.  From where I sit, through the window I can see a church steeple and hear the tolling of the bells.  These bells have tolled for centuries, celebrating baptisms, warning of dangers such as wars, calling the community to worship, and notifying of deaths from many causes, including plagues.  The cemetery surrounding the church serves as the burial place of those who died from accidents, wars, flus, and plagues.  It has served as a place of sanctuary for many generations.  There is a powerful message of the providence and reign of God.  In a time of fear, worry, and uncertainty, some people want to be reminded of that message and feel the peace of being surrounding by God's community.  

I think the big question to wrestle with is "How does the church serve as the light of the world rather than appearing as a dark, closed, empty place until times are better?"  

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13 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

I'd be quoting some choice passages right back! Starting with love thy neighbor, hitting on what you do for the least of these (like self isolate!!), and ending on the sabbath being made for man, not man for the sabbath. Ugh. 

I brought up love thy neighbor and got the retreat training that was supposed to be held Saturday canceled.  It seems like our city and the adjoining city is taking things very seriously but to the west of us, things aren't the same.  That person in charge was to the west of us.  The Kiwanis in a city west of us but in our town had a two day pancake breakfast fundraiser and the news reported that thousands attended yesterday.

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38 minutes ago, Bootsie said:

I am in a setting right now that is very far removed from my everyday life as an American.  From where I sit, through the window I can see a church steeple and hear the tolling of the bells.  These bells have tolled for centuries, celebrating baptisms, warning of dangers such as wars, calling the community to worship, and notifying of deaths from many causes, including plagues.  The cemetery surrounding the church serves as the burial place of those who died from accidents, wars, flus, and plagues.  It has served as a place of sanctuary for many generations.  There is a powerful message of the providence and reign of God.  In a time of fear, worry, and uncertainty, some people want to be reminded of that message and feel the peace of being surrounding by God's community.  

I think the big question to wrestle with is "How does the church serve as the light of the world rather than appearing as a dark, closed, empty place until times are better?"  

By doing charitable things that do not involve close contact like for the healthy to continue to help with Meals on wheels (which thankfully is continuing), donations to food banks, being avialable for tele- counseling, etc.

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We’ve lived in places where we could only meet in small groups or in our own home for church, either because there weren’t other members of our denomination nearby or because of government restrictions on church meetings.  It’s kind of odd to be going back to that now, and thinking of people in the US doing that.  Our friends always thought it was so weird and unique when we had church at home or through zoom. Now they’re doing it. 🙂

If you’re missing church today, try to find ways to stay connected with God and with each other.  This is just a small moment, and there are good things that can happen because of it.

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The Coptic Church here in Egypt is shutting down any extra things, but they’re increasing the number daily masses to reduce the number of people attending at any one time.

I love Lent and Easter here, so this is sad for me.  But inevitable.  I wonder how they will handle Holy Week and Easter.

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Our diocese has given a dispensation but the letter reads that only those who show signs of sickness or at increased risk should stay home. Everyone else should just not touch people. As of now we have 1 case in our diocese. We went to church last night, there were only 8 other people attending besides our family (it is a very small church). Every family has their own pew(and there is only 1 service for the entire week) and our spread apart in church, we did not touch anyone. I wish they would move to online services for the diocese so we didn't have to worry about it. My priest seems to take it as a personal affront we are doing anything at all, since it isn't bad here, we are worried too soon when of course the whole point is to stop things from getting so bad in the first place.

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I am sitting by the fire right now.  I should be in church.  My son was asked to help serve communion this week, and he had to tell the church that we would not be there for a while.

I attend a Protestant Church of about 300 members in a metropolitan area.  Our church cancelled all small group activities, such as Sunday school classes, yet decided to meet as normal for our large worship service.??

I have been in touch with a couple of my elderly friends who have decided to stay home to protect their own health. I am so happy that they have made a wise decision about this, but I am worried for those who will choose to go as long as the doors remain open.

All this to say...my heart hurts this morning. I almost feel as if my faith is being tested...we are trying to prove who is the stronger Christian...who won’t ‘neglect assembly’.  I know that the Lord is with me right now, in this room, and yet I feel such guilt!

Hugs to all who are struggling with this.  May the peace of the Lord be with us all.

Edited by Hadley
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3 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

By doing charitable things that do not involve close contact like for the healthy to continue to help with Meals on wheels (which thankfully is continuing), donations to food banks, being avialable for tele- counseling, etc.

My county's Council on Aging has temporarily suspended Meals on Wheels. I hope there are backups in place. 

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Our small church is still meeting.  I'm frustrated because our church is full of elderly and high risk people.  I think the deacons and Pastor should have made the decision easier for them by cancelling.  (And my dh is one of the deacons!  ). I'm praying for a good attitude as I head out the door.  On Wednesday night after I mentioned not shaking hands, our pastor went down our pew and shook my kids hands with a laugh.  I really have a bad attitude this morning 😞

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Our church created a medical group early in this to help the elders and staff make decisions. Several docs who are infectious disease specialists are on it.

They clearly get the "flatten the curve" objective. Nobody wants to see Italy's scenario reproduced here!!

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I should be finishing teaching Sunday School and heading to Mass, but here I am at home. Though I am not too worried about DH, our kids, or myself, I don't want to be someone who passes it unknowingly. So, though I don't like missing Mass, I am trying to do things I can to flatten the curve.

Yet, I am sure my older mom attended Mass today, after having returned from an out of state trip yesterday. 

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Just finished watching a livestream of services at our church.  The minister was there, the music director, and someone is running the video.  I'm glad they were able to get this together so fast - we only made the decision to cancel on Tuesday, and it's looking ever more like it was the right decision.

I think we're trying to get some kind of contact circles going to check in on our elderly members and maybe do shopping or prescription runs for them.

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