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I can’t make a decision about getting a new dog.


Quill
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Our beautiful GSD, Sarge, died in 2016, at 12 yrs old. My dh was particularly attached to him and said he never loved a dog (or any pet) like that before. He’s not really a “pet person”; he grew up on a farm and dogs and cats were meant for utilitarian purposes in his way of thinking. 

Anyway. My youngest ds was rooting the most for getting another dog, but we’ve been reluctant. Partly, dogs are really a bit of a pain in the neck. But also, there’s a big dilemma to me about what kind of dog to get. 

Dh really only wants another German Shepherd. He loved Sarge so much and was always so proud of owning such a fine dog. And I do personally agree with this sentiment. Sarge was smart, beautifully marked and was just such a bad-ass dog to have. When I see German Shepherd puppies, I so melt. 

But there are things that concern me about the breed. I feel like there is a greater likelihood of getting a puppy of this breed who has the wrong temperament. The dog would not be raised around kids and that worries me for future grandkids. And the hip dysplasia concern is there, too. I believe that if we get another German Shepherd, it will gravitate towards being dh’s dog, like Sarge was. It won’t really be “my” dog. 

Ds wants a Labrador. I am not against that, but then I feel like the dog is “for ds,” moreso than for me or dh, because dh doesn’t especially want a Lab, though he likes them okay. He just likes a GSD much more. Needless to say, with ds being 14, any dog we get now is not really “for him,” though I’m sure he would like playing with the dog; it has to be a dog *we* love for 10-14 years. 

If I were getting a dog entirely for my own enjoyment and dh and ds’s favorites were secondary, I would want either a Border Collie, an Australian Shepherd or some mutt of this type of mix. MY “best dog in my life” was my Sheltie/Spitz mix of my teens and early twenties, Nika. And I love a dog of this type: smart, trainable, calm and sweet temperament. 

So. I think the crux of the question is: who is the dog supposed to be primarily for? Or should we even get one at all?

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GET ALL THE DOGS!!!

Sorry, I have dog fever, but swore I wouldn’t get another until we could have a fenced yard.  I’m absolutely no help.  I guess I could say that no dog in our family ever picked the person it was supposed to “be for”. My puppy was supposed to be my “forever” baby, but he prefers my oldest dd and sometimes my middle ds.

ETA: he’s not an actual puppy , just tiny.

Edited by Carrie12345
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These are good questions. I would say the pet is for whoever wants a pet the most in the family. But it doesn't always work out that way. We tried to get a dog for one of our daughters recently--hoping it was a one person dog--just for her. They didn't click, and the dog bonded to me and my husband. I think that's partly because of dd's temperament. lol

 If you get a purebred, do NOT buy from a backyard breeder. Then you have much better assurance of health and temperament. Ask your vet for recommendations. 

Another thing to consider. Check out some reputable rescues. My daughters started a rescue that rescues dogs off "death row" in high kill shelters in rural areas in our state and a neighboring state. (If you click the link you can scroll down and see the variety of dogs they have adopted out.) They and the other officers are very good at judging temperament. They also foster these dogs for an extended period of time in their homes. So they are thoroughly vetted. Treated for any medical issues. They socialize them. Cat and dog test them. They crate train and house train them before placing in a home. They are very up front about it if any of the dogs have any behavior issues. I'm obviously biased toward this option. 😉

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50 minutes ago, Quill said:

So. I think the crux of the question is: who is the dog supposed to be primarily for? Or should we even get one at all?

I'd say for the person who will be responsible for the majority of the dog's training and care. Which certainly won't be a 14 y/o who will leave for college in four years.

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6 minutes ago, regentrude said:

I'd say for the person who will be responsible for the majority of the dog's training and care. Which certainly won't be a 14 y/o who will leave for college in four years.

I have 3 in college right now, and they all have dogs. And 2 regularly keep fosters, too. Clearly not for everyone, but...it's possible. 🙂

Edited by popmom
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I don't know the answer to your questions, but a couple comments on some of the breeds you mentioned:

My dh grew up with German Shepherds and absolutely loves them, but we'll never get one because they are prone to too many health problems. Hip dysplasia is just the tip of the iceberg. We inherited my MIL's German Shepherd after she died and he developed degenerative myelopathy at a young age, lost the use of his legs, and had to be put to sleep. It was heartbreaking. That's a fairly common problem for the breed, but there are many, many more.

Border collies and Aussies are two of my great loves.❤️ I grew up with a border collie and have two Aussies and an Aussie/Catahoula now. They are definitely smart, trainable, and sweet - but calm? Only if you give them tons of exercise, both physical and mental. They are super high energy and need a job to do, or they will find one on their own and you might not like it.🙂My experience with these breeds is that they do better when they are not an only dog - having at least one other canine companion helps keep them busy and stimulated.  

 

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9 minutes ago, popmom said:

I have 3 in college right now, and they all have dogs. And 2 regularly keep fosters, too. Clearly not for everyone, but...it's possible. 🙂

Yeah, it can be done I know, but I do think like regentrude AFA mot viewing day as THE dog owner because of the need for flexible life plans in late teens/early twenties. 

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11 minutes ago, Selkie said:

I don't know the answer to your questions, but a couple comments on some of the breeds you mentioned:

My dh grew up with German Shepherds and absolutely loves them, but we'll never get one because they are prone to too many health problems. Hip dysplasia is just the tip of the iceberg. We inherited my MIL's German Shepherd after she died and he developed degenerative myelopathy at a young age, lost the use of his legs, and had to be put to sleep. It was heartbreaking. That's a fairly common problem for the breed, but there are many, many more.

Border collies and Aussies are two of my great loves.❤️ I grew up with a border collie and have two Aussies and an Aussie/Catahoula now. They are definitely smart, trainable, and sweet - but calm? Only if you give them tons of exercise, both physical and mental. They are super high energy and need a job to do, or they will find one on their own and you might not like it.🙂My experience with these breeds is that they do better when they are not an only dog - having at least one other canine companion helps keep them busy and stimulated.  

 

Yeah I know you’re right about energy and need to use those brains. Even Sarge was never a “calm” dog. We had to buy an immobilized neck collar when he was neutered because he totally destroyed the “cone” they normally put on dogs post surgery! 😏

I really just wish a dog would turn up in my life; that was how I got my “best dog of my life”. But that’s not really a thing anymore because few people have accidental mixes these days. 

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We got a dog for the kids. Little DD specifically but the puppy sleeps in DS’s room She fell in love with Yorkies when walking around Paris and that’s the ONE she wanted and what we now have (Yorkies really hard to find!). I am ambivalent about dogs, I just wanted a non shed dog. We have land and chickens and this dog that’s smaller than a cat doesn’t at all fit but DD is beyond over the moon. It’s so worth it for that. Eta that the martyr here is DH who’s never had such a tiny dog before...the kids, they make you do things. Dd walks around the house “I love this dog...” ❤️

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I suggest you contact your most recent veterinarian and put out the word about what you are looking for, he or she may learn of a right dog, which is a bit like a dog “just showing up.”

Our home owners no longer allows GSD, which is something to be aware of. Otherwise I think a well bred well raised gsd could have been what we got.  We know an excellent breeder for them.  

We have tended to go with Labrador mixes and that’s mostly been excellent.

I woyluld tend to suggest a Lab as desired by your son perhaps in summer when he can deal with lots of the young dog house training and exercise needs.  

Unless you are really sure you can’t love a lab , you will probably fall in love with a good well bred, well trained lab / or well chosen lab mix. Perhaps a lab x border collie if one headed your way would be nice. Especially if it got the border collie intelligence and the lab typical less high strung personality rather than the worst of both breeds

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1 hour ago, popmom said:

These are good questions. I would say the pet is for whoever wants a pet the most in the family. But it doesn't always work out that way. We tried to get a dog for one of our daughters recently--hoping it was a one person dog--just for her. They didn't click, and the dog bonded to me and my husband. I think that's partly because of dd's temperament. lol

 If you get a purebred, do NOT buy from a backyard breeder. Then you have much better assurance of health and temperament. Ask your vet for recommendations. 

Another thing to consider. Check out some reputable rescues. My daughters started a rescue that rescues dogs off "death row" in high kill shelters in rural areas in our state and a neighboring state. (If you click the link you can scroll down and see the variety of dogs they have adopted out.) They and the other officers are very good at judging temperament. They also foster these dogs for an extended period of time in their homes. So they are thoroughly vetted. Treated for any medical issues. They socialize them. Cat and dog test them. They crate train and house train them before placing in a home. They are very up front about it if any of the dogs have any behavior issues. I'm obviously biased toward this option. 😉

I have never owned a dog, so I have no advice.  But, I wanted to comment because I think this rescue idea is just lovely.  Well done!

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21 minutes ago, Dotwithaperiod said:

If I had him now, I’d be one of those old ladies who buy their dogs matching outfits and take them everywhere.

She has a leather coat already 😂but is too tiny even for the XS. Dd: “our dog is so smart she undresses herself”😂😂😂

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I never had a GSD but one of my friends did. After one of them passed (she had hip issues as well but died from other things) my friend and dh got a Belgian Malinois. They are slightly smaller than GSD's, I think but apparently have fewer hips issues. I also found out from local law enforcement that they are now preferred over GSD's for police dog training mostly due to the decreased incidents of hip malformations.

Other than that, it's of course entirely up to you and your dh.  🙂

 

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I don't know anything about GSDs, but my daughter and her husband have the absolute cutest chocolate lab puppy.  She is the sweetest thing and is so smart!  And her eyes just melt you.  Aaaahhhh! Puppies! Whatever you go with, please post photos!

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Now that I’ve had sleep and am a little calmer (still want you to get all the dogs), I do agree with all of the mixy-mutt people that those can be the absolute best.

Our dogs who have passed were a GSD/Rottweiler mix and a Rottweiler/Lab mix. The GSD was nearly entirely GSD in appearance, but without the extreme angles of today’s breed standards. Absolutely gorgeous! And the Rottie had a slightly smaller head than typical, along with the ears and tail of a lab, and almost no jowly drool. With a husband who grew up with GSDs, and Rottweilers being my long time favorite, we got everything we wanted with much fewer drawbacks of our preferred breeds. They both made it to 9/10-ish without health issues.

Granted, there was so much luck involved. We didn’t look with specific intent. We just stumbled across the one online, at a rescue in the next state over, and the other happened to be at the adoption event where we went to to pick up the first.

Man,  want another big dog!!!

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6 hours ago, Liz CA said:

I never had a GSD but one of my friends did. After one of them passed (she had hip issues as well but died from other things) my friend and dh got a Belgian Malinois. They are slightly smaller than GSD's, I think but apparently have fewer hips issues. I also found out from local law enforcement that they are now preferred over GSD's for police dog training mostly due to the decreased incidents of hip malformations.

Other than that, it's of course entirely up to you and your dh.  🙂

 

Yes, I like them. When we did a field trip with the K-9 unit, one was a black Lab and the other was a Malinois. 

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I would have suggested that after your dog passed away, that you wait a minimum of 90 days and that then you look for another dog. You gave that dog a wonderful home with a very long life. I hope you will contemplate doing the same for another very lucky dog.

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GSD lover forever here.

Our dogs have always been GSD's or GSD mixes.  Our mixes were both rescues-- great family dogs but they both came with additional baggage due to prior abuse.

Our current lab-shepherd mix is on her last days (13 yrs old with lots of age-related health issues).  We are in the 'do we get another dog'/'what type of dog will we get' stage.  Our current GSD just turned 8.  He wanted to be a Frisbee dog when he grew up and DH encouraged him (it ruined his shoulders and knees--150 pound dogs were NOT meant to do flips!)-- he is solid white (white GSD from white GSD from white GSD-- and is an absolutely stunning dog--AND one of the biggest/sweetest dogs in the world too.

DH is thinking of a slightly smaller dog and really really wants a Frisbee dog... however, both of us absolutely MELT when we see a GSD...  I totally see a Riker or a Seven in our future (all of our dogs have had Star Trek names).

 

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I was worried about getting a GSD for my son as well.  So many problems with some of them.  However I found a breeder and a beautiful puppy for him, I've met multiple dogs from her and they are all healthy wonderful dogs.  She is a wonderful dog and healthy, beautiful, smart, great temperament.  I love her, never thought I would but she is wonderful.    If you're interested this is our breeder, it says puppies would be born in February.  Sweetheart German Shepherds. 

http://sweetheartgermanshepherds.com/available puppies.htm

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After owning two GSDs, we are definitely a little gunshy. We had a lot of luck in tempermant- but I know so many people who haven't. 

I thought I would always want a big dog-but we got a corgi. She is the best dog we have ever had- smart, fun, easily trainable- but relaxed in the house, dh takes her on multi-day hikes in the mountains. Just an all around great dog.

Now, it is hard to imagine our house without a corgi.

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3 hours ago, Quill said:

Not recently, but yeah, I have looked there. If we were to get a GSD, I probably wouldn’t go this route, though. A collie-type mix from there would be okay though. 

There are several lab and GSD mixes on Pet Finder--pups in the DC area

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I didn't read all the replies. I agree that a good GSD is a fantastic dog, but that a bad GSD is a nightmare and there are way more bad than good ones. 

Medically most suck. Horrid horrid issues with backs, hips, digestive tract, etc. So many sick ones. 

Temperment wise most are even worse. Almost all the ones I see now are horribly shy, easily spooked, etc. Way way way overbred that direction. It's terrible what has happened to them. Just neurotic. 

So, adding in that grandchildren may be in the future and you won't have kids now to socialize with it, etc...the only way I'd be okay with that was if you had a ton of money to throw at a great breeder and a lto of time to research them. 

 

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1 hour ago, Dynamite5 said:

There are several lab and GSD mixes on Pet Finder--pups in the DC area

Yeah, but I’m leery of GSDs on that site. If we get a GSD, it *cannot* be a rescue. Full stop, that’s my line in the sand. There’s too much likelihood that the previous owner didn’t handle the dog properly or didn’t understand the needs of that type of dog. Or that the dog was badly bred. 

Labs on that site - I would consider it but it annoys me that Pit Bull mixes are constantly listed as Lab mixes on every adoption site. I do not want a Pit mix, full stop; that’s my other line in the sand. 

I *would* consider a collie or shepherding mix from a rescue site. 

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15 minutes ago, Dynamite5 said:

@Quill--I think you misunderstood my post...there are actual GSD and lab mix puppies on Pet Finder. Puppies, who will know only your training and which are probably accidental breedings, which generally make the best pups, anyway!

 

I think her point isn't just how they are handled and raised, but genetics. Genetics account for a whole lot, both temperment and health wise. And in GSD's and GSD mixes, that is especially true. For a single guy or people that are willing to take that on and don't expect a lot of strangers or kids, ok. For Quill, she feels that a possible behavioral rehab situation is more than she wants to take on. 

@Quill, have you looked to see if there are any border collie rescues in your area? Sometimes they get dogs that didn't work out as herding dogs, but would make good pets. Ones that are too low energy for herding would be better for a family. 

Edited by Ktgrok
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Also, if part of your DH's attachment to the GSD breed is having a striking, good looking dog at his side, what about a Golden Retreiver? Some of them can be gorgeous and it would likely be very smart and obedient. More impressive looking than a labrador. 

Maybe a "date day" where you go to a local dog show and check out other breeds as well?

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3 hours ago, Jann in TX said:

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Gorgeous dog!!!

Dutch shepherds are smaller and very high energy.   New Canaan dogs are smaller and maybe a bit shepherd like too.  Plus of course border collies. 

 

 

There are white Swiss Shepherds that look a lot like this white GSD too.  The Swiss Shepherds are rare in USA and are very expensive, but seem to have positive GSD qualities without as much aggression and health issues.  They have more normal hips afaik.  Breeders are trying to keep control so they don’t end up puppy milled and with health and temperament problems. 

I would love to have a Swiss Shepherd other than cost (and maybe shedding 🙃)!

When it looked possible that my son might start Search and Rescue volunteer training I looked into them as a possible breed for dog handler unit 

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27 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Also, if part of your DH's attachment to the GSD breed is having a striking, good looking dog at his side, what about a Golden Retreiver? Some of them can be gorgeous and it would likely be very smart and obedient. More impressive looking than a labrador. 

Maybe a "date day" where you go to a local dog show and check out other breeds as well?

 

Those are good ideas.

Golden Retriever might be a good compromise .

 

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If you're thinking of a rescue dog and want a herding breed, there are a lot of Aussies and border collies who end up at shelters. People get them for their looks and then don't like the high-energy, intense personality that comes with those looks . A lot of them get banished to the backyard (so sad for any dog 😢) and then end up being surrendered to a shelter. 

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Oh and to answer your question.  All dogs in my house are for me.  I'm the dog person.  I walk them, feed them, spend time with them, groom them.  Dh if left alone probably wouldn't have a dog or would get a lab.  Each kid wants and likes a different type and size of dog. Older sons love GSD and since they live on their own they can have them. Older daugher wants either a PWD or maybe a Havanese, Next daughter a shih tuz, youngest son a dachshund . I love most dogs but one of my favorite dogs I've owned was a boxer but due to allergies not a good choice.  We have Portuguese Water Dogs because that is what I love and I love that they don't shed. We have owned on for the past 15+ years and the two I currently have are only 4 and 6 so lots of years left.  After that not sure but I know I will have a dog.

 

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I don't have a lot to add about the breed, but I vote getting a puppy sooner rather than later. They're just so life-giving. Seriously, getting a puppy was one of the best things we've done in the last year (and a half, almost). Puppy= joy! Also, it's really helped to have teens around while making it through the puppy-puppy phase. They helped to lighten the burden.

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3 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Also, if part of your DH's attachment to the GSD breed is having a striking, good looking dog at his side, what about a Golden Retreiver? Some of them can be gorgeous and it would likely be very smart and obedient. More impressive looking than a labrador. 

Maybe a "date day" where you go to a local dog show and check out other breeds as well?

I like Goldens but he would not want one because Goldens are “his brother’s thing.” You know, like, his brother has a Golden and only gets Goldens. Seems silly, I’m sure, but 🤷🏻‍♀️ . People make decisions about pets and sometimes have their quirky biases, I guess. 

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2 hours ago, Selkie said:

If you're thinking of a rescue dog and want a herding breed, there are a lot of Aussies and border collies who end up at shelters. People get them for their looks and then don't like the high-energy, intense personality that comes with those looks . A lot of them get banished to the backyard (so sad for any dog 😢) and then end up being surrendered to a shelter. 

Well, TBH, I am not looking for a rescue. I might accept a rescue under certain circumstances, but it’s not my heart’s desire to rescue a dog. I don’t want to cope with a dog who has a bad history. I don’t have the bandwidth for it. I want a dog who is a fine companion without a lot of dark history to mitigate. 

As far as ordinary shelters (i.e., not breed-specific rescues), nice herding dogs don’t end up there. My local animal shelter is well stocked with pit bull/mixes and hound mixes and that’s about it. I think the regular shelter here is just the bottom-of-the-barrel of dogs. 

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Just a few thoughts...  We're a dog family, and always had a dog while our kids were growing up.   The last dog we got when all the kids were still home was a German Shepherd. We bought him on a whim and he was so sweet at first, but at just 4 months became very aggressive.  So, I second making sure that you know very well who you would get a GS from.  But, what I really wanted to say is that we also got a dog when we just had our youngest left at home, and it was totally different.  We were gone a lot more than we realized -- visiting older children, going to weekend activities with our youngest, helping aging parents, etc., and it was tough having a big dog to care for.  So, that's something to think about.  Also, we did have an Australian Shepherd once and boy, was he high energy.  That was actually quite hard for this "townie" family.  When I was a child, we had an Australian Shepherd mix, and he was great.  He was pretty laid back and was easy to keep up with.  So, I encourage you to think about all of those things.

We don't have any dog now 😞 because we are gone too much and our lives are totally different now.  We're not the homeschooling family at home anymore.  But, we have two "grand-dogs" that we take care of a lot!  Both of them are mutts, and both of them are great travelers and easy to have around.  One is a rescue from Latin America (he was starving and would probably only have lived another 24 hours when my dd was living there).  He is the gentlest dog we've ever known and we love him to death.  He's mid-sized.  Then our other dd has a mutt from who was born from a rescued dog who was pregnant!  He's a small dog -- we think a mix of beagle, pug, and chihuahua, and is the friendliest dog we've ever had.  He's sooo easy!  And he travels well and can even fit into a backpack to take on a city bus.  (Which our dd does, with his little head peeking out. 🙂)  But he has the personality of a big dog -- he really connects with people and isn't a yapper.

I'm absolutely not saying don't get a dog, because they are truly special.  But maybe consider the size and breed.

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26 minutes ago, sassenach said:

I don't have a lot to add about the breed, but I vote getting a puppy sooner rather than later. They're just so life-giving. Seriously, getting a puppy was one of the best things we've done in the last year (and a half, almost). Puppy= joy! Also, it's really helped to have teens around while making it through the puppy-puppy phase. They helped to lighten the burden.

Thank you for that. I take adding a dog to the family very seriously because I believe in committing to pets until death unless some extremely intense unforeseen issue crops up. (Like if a horrible tragedy happens and I have to suddenly move into an apartment, say. Or a family member has a health crisis and cannot have a dog around no matter what.) 

But because I take it so seriously, it makes me more afraid of making a poor choice. 

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26 minutes ago, Quill said:

Thank you for that. I take adding a dog to the family very seriously because I believe in committing to pets until death unless some extremely intense unforeseen issue crops up. (Like if a horrible tragedy happens and I have to suddenly move into an apartment, say. Or a family member has a health crisis and cannot have a dog around no matter what.) 

But because I take it so seriously, it makes me more afraid of making a poor choice. 

Yeah, I get that. We're labrador people for that reason. Predictable, lovely temperaments and we always know what we're getting (within a certain range). We purchase purebreds for that reason, too (even though I know that makes us terrible people to some).

Best wishes in your decision!

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1 hour ago, Quill said:

Well, TBH, I am not looking for a rescue. I might accept a rescue under certain circumstances, but it’s not my heart’s desire to rescue a dog. I don’t want to cope with a dog who has a bad history. I don’t have the bandwidth for it. I want a dog who is a fine companion without a lot of dark history to mitigate. 

As far as ordinary shelters (i.e., not breed-specific rescues), nice herding dogs don’t end up there. My local animal shelter is well stocked with pit bull/mixes and hound mixes and that’s about it. I think the regular shelter here is just the bottom-of-the-barrel of dogs. 

This is how I feel, and the situation in my community. I have a particular type (temperament, personality, several options of breeds/mixes) of dog I'm interested in due to the needs of our family, and the rescue dogs around here don't fit the profile. Of course, I'm having to wait due to other financial obligations, but I'd rather do that than get in too big of a hurry in my impatience to just "get a dog," and then regret it.

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2 hours ago, Quill said:

I like Goldens but he would not want one because Goldens are “his brother’s thing.” You know, like, his brother has a Golden and only gets Goldens. Seems silly, I’m sure, but 🤷🏻‍♀️ . People make decisions about pets and sometimes have their quirky biases, I guess. 

Lol, I get it. 

I can try to think of some other ideas, of striking looking dogs, that are smart, etc. (and I totally get it - I LOVE having a striking dog...call me vain. But I've had weimaraners that were gorgeous, and my hound mix now is SO handsome - everyone comments on him. It gives me joy to look at him. And the border collie is handsome of course, and the goldendoodle/wolf hybrid is just so funny looking it makes me laugh). 

There are some gorgeous bird dogs and such...let me think. Something regal and impressive and smart and obedient, right?

2 hours ago, Quill said:

Well, TBH, I am not looking for a rescue. I might accept a rescue under certain circumstances, but it’s not my heart’s desire to rescue a dog. I don’t want to cope with a dog who has a bad history. I don’t have the bandwidth for it. I want a dog who is a fine companion without a lot of dark history to mitigate. 

As far as ordinary shelters (i.e., not breed-specific rescues), nice herding dogs don’t end up there. My local animal shelter is well stocked with pit bull/mixes and hound mixes and that’s about it. I think the regular shelter here is just the bottom-of-the-barrel of dogs. 

Quill, I want to say that I have almost always rescued, and have three rescues now, and I think you at this point, after all you've been through, are smart to realize that you don't want to deal with that right now. My next dog will be a puppy. My last two were pre-owned and yeah, you have crap to deal with in those situations. I was able to, but I think next time I just plain don't want to. Puppies are hard work in a different way. 

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2 hours ago, Quill said:

Well, TBH, I am not looking for a rescue. I might accept a rescue under certain circumstances, but it’s not my heart’s desire to rescue a dog. I don’t want to cope with a dog who has a bad history. I don’t have the bandwidth for it. I want a dog who is a fine companion without a lot of dark history to mitigate. 

As far as ordinary shelters (i.e., not breed-specific rescues), nice herding dogs don’t end up there. My local animal shelter is well stocked with pit bull/mixes and hound mixes and that’s about it. I think the regular shelter here is just the bottom-of-the-barrel of dogs. 

 

We got our purebred weimaraner from our local shelter.  Do you have more shelters around you?  She doesn't have a bad history at all.  Just given up with her mate from a family that went through a divorce.  We also got background info on how she was with kids. 

I do get the get that a lot of labs are listed as pits too.   

I don't know anything about GSDs.    I love labs.   Love.  That is the dog that my extended family had growing up.  But they also had a mix who was great.  I say do not go with the dog your kid wants.  To big of a choice for them to make, when it is going to be your problem all the time.  

I love our weimaraner too.  But have heard other people say they are nuts.  Our girl isn't.  But we adopted her when she was 7 and had lots of puppies so that energy was probably sucked out having puppies.   

But if I was picking out a dog it would be a lab. 

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11 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

 

We got our purebred weimaraner from our local shelter.  Do you have more shelters around you?  She doesn't have a bad history at all.  Just given up with her mate from a family that went through a divorce.  We also got background info on how she was with kids. 

I do get the get that a lot of labs are listed as pits too.   

I don't know anything about GSDs.    I love labs.   Love.  That is the dog that my extended family had growing up.  But they also had a mix who was great.  I say do not go with the dog your kid wants.  To big of a choice for them to make, when it is going to be your problem all the time.  

I love our weimaraner too.  But have heard other people say they are nuts.  Our girl isn't.  But we adopted her when she was 7 and had lots of puppies so that energy was probably sucked out having puppies.   

But if I was picking out a dog it would be a lab. 

Some areas the purebred dogs (and even teh very adoptable but recognizable mixes) get taken out of the shelters by breed specific rescue groups. So a purebred weimaraner in many areas would be pulled from the shelter as soon as it came in and taken to a breed rescue in those places. Which may be why the dogs at her shelter are mostly pits and hounds. 

And having owned two weims and fostered 2 more, I can say that they calm down and become great dogs right around age 7. I used to tell that specific age to lots of people 🙂

So you got in on the calm part. 

Weimaraners, when bred for field, have the energy and drive of a border collie but hardly any of the tendency toward obedience that a border collie has. Think 70 pound toddler....for years and years. (it isn't that they can't be obedient or learn, but they want to know why first, and what is in it for them. Then they will decide if they want to do it or not. Nothing like a dog bred to follow orders for generations. Weims, like hounds, seek out the sent and the human follows them, and they still think they should be in charge)

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What about a Samoyed?

Our neighbor has one and he is such a wonderful dog. Absolutely beautiful, friendly, and well-behaved.  I'm not really a "dog person" but I'd get a dog like him if DH was willing. We probably never will though because we are both "cat people."

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What does he not like, if anything, about a border collie? Would one of the larger ones work for him? Maybe a tri-color?

Oh! In the book The Other End of The Leash by Patricia McConnel she describes how her border collie literally saved her life by climbing over a wooden wall - tearing out his own toe nails in the process - to get INTO an enclosure where an angry 200 pound sheep had backed Patricia into a corner and was charging her over and over again. Luke, her border collie (who my border collie is named after), got in, drove off the sheep many times his own size, and saved her. 

If that's not noble and brave enough, I don't know what is! Maybe share that with your husband!

 

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