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Shelf stable meal ideas...Corona virus spinoff

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The title is pretty self explanatory.  Share your shelf stable meal ideas.  Bonus points if water isn't needed.

Spaghetti noodles cooked in jarred marinara sauce.  Serve with canned green beans.

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beans and rice *no bonus points lol

packaged rice pilaf pouch (microwavable) with canned chicken

How shelf stable? Would tortillas be pretty stable? You could do beans and rice in a tortilla

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2 minutes ago, Chris in VA said:

 

beans and rice *no bonus points lol

packaged rice pilaf pouch (microwavable) with canned chicken

How shelf stable? Would tortillas be pretty stable? You could do beans and rice in a tortilla

 

Any ideas are awesome. I was specifically thinking in terms of necessary emergency preparedness situation.

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There are these emergency preparedness meals you can buy. Wise Company 

 

Edited by Chris in VA
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No bonus points for me, lol.

I’ve always focused on basic ingredients, which generally do require water, but I can cook them indoors or out.  Basic ingredients also run cheaper, so I can store more as well as water and water filtration stuff.  There’s only so much water one can store, but with a nearby source and a good filter...

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I try to keep things simple when it comes to being prepared for emergencies. I don't think in terms of traditional meals, but in simply being able to meet calorie requirements for awhile. That means staying stocked on no prep or easy to prepare things that we normally eat and that have a decent shelf life -- nut butters and a variety of crackers, pouched tuna and salmon, canned beans and soups, peaches (the only canned fruit we like), protein/energy bars. Add in a few cans of spaghetti and meatballs, beef stew and a few boxes of instant oatmeal (those are things we don't typically eat, but are inexpensive--I keep some on hand for emergencies; if we don't use them I donate to a food drive before they expire and then restock our supply).

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We have a Rubbermaid box of food that we keep on hand for times when we lose power.  Some of the items we keep/meals that we make:

 

Canned chicken breast and sliced pepperoni mixed with spaghetti/pizza sauce served on rolls or in pitas.

Boboli pizza crust, pizza sauce, pepperoni, canned grated Parmesan cheese.

Peanut butter and honey sandwiches.

Spaghetti-os, canned soups that are not condensed, canned ravioli, baked beans (not great served right out of the can, but will work in desperation)

 

We also tend to keep dry cereal, dried fruit, canned fruit, beef jerkey, peanut butter and honey crackers

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My husband’s idea of a meal is Heinz baked beans in a can UK version https://www.worldmarket.com/product/heinz-baked-beans.do

My kids can survive on Trader Joe’s boxed soups. 

We also have cans of Trader Joe’s Wild Alaskan Pink Salmon 14.75oz in the house which we can just eat as is, or dunk into a soup. 

Lots of boxes of Epic venison jerky because I needed a convenient high protein snack.
A few big cans of chocolate flavored protein powder for the same reason. They do dissolve well in a blender bottle with room temperature water, just requires lots of shaking to blend.

Our “extra” rations are what we would eat if there is a power outage and gas outage. So no cooking required and no refrigeration required stuff. My parents have extras of ensure for seniors bottles for the same reason. 
 

ETA:

Chocolate bars and chocolate chip cookies are considered earthquake prep rations. If we are ever in quarantine due to earthquake, we want comfort food. Most have expiry of at least a year so definitely eaten and replenished before they could expire.

Edited by Arcadia
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No formal "meal" ideas.  When we've been without power for extended periods of time, we've done a lot of canned tuna, Beef-a-roni (so help me, I hope I never have to eat that stuff again), various canned meats, ramen noodle cups, peanut butter sandwiches, canned veggies, pepperoni. We had a gas grill, so we were able to cook, but it's better to keep meals simple if you are in a situation where gas, electric, water need to be conserved. You won't want to waste water on washing dishes.

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27 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

I try to keep things simple when it comes to being prepared for emergencies. I don't think in terms of traditional meals, but in simply being able to meet calorie requirements for awhile. That means staying stocked on no prep or easy to prepare things that we normally eat and that have a decent shelf life -- nut butters and a variety of crackers, pouched tuna and salmon, canned beans and soups, peaches (the only canned fruit we like), protein/energy bars. Add in a few cans of spaghetti and meatballs, beef stew and a few boxes of instant oatmeal (those are things we don't typically eat, but are inexpensive--I keep some on hand for emergencies; if we don't use them I donate to a food drive before they expire and then restock our supply).

 

Pretty much same here for our usual long weather related power outages.   Jarred Apple sauce rather than canned peaches.  

Canned chili, instant oatmeal are things we’ve been able to heat up decently since getting a woodstove.

before that things that were okay cold like sardines, peanut butter, crackers

we use up what we can of non shelf stable stuff first

that can be hard sometimes to make sure bread which will go moldy for example gets used before crackers and chips that won’t 

and if I expect outages (ice or flood or strong winds predicted)  I have tried to cook up things that I don’t want to have go bad in the days before outage... (Like non canned fish if any, chicken if any ... hard boil eggs or make a baked eggs dish ...)

Soft tortillas aren’t shelf stable IME , but the dry ones already shaped as taco shells are.

rice and beans take water, but can be done so that the water used gets eaten rather than tossed , thoughbeans may be gassier  that way.  

Canned beans are easier, and can be eaten cold if necessary. 

Many dried things like beans and grains have greatly reduced cooking time needed if soaked first, and if sprouting is possible that is supposed to increase nutrition—but does take water...

I don’t really like to use canned food, but it’s a huge help to have some in outages.  I assume same would be true in other situations like quarantine. 

There are books about gourmet survival cooking, but frankly we tend to go with easy stuff... 

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Before getting more stuff I recommend look at what you already have and think through what can go with what and in what order.  

Like, step 1 might be to turn fresh meat and vegetables into soups and stews, freeze.  If not needed for emergency they can be used up as cook ahead food. 

And think through what little additions could make things better... maybe a mixed spice, for example.

miso by t w isn’t shelf stable, but it lasts well for a long time and makes a good broth including if people not feeling well IME 

 

what would you miss hugely? I have found having some powdered instant coffee quite nice in outages, for example.    I agree with some chocolate being nice for comfort food too. And I guess for us instant oatmeal has been good that way too, especially if a desirable flavor. 

We have some granola bars that don’t get eaten right up because no one really likes them, but which would probably look more appealing if they were only ones left.  Sometimes we have camping meals around, but currently not because they do tend to get used when it isn’t an emergency nor camping.  

Also consider if there are any growing edible food plants around, especially if you aren’t in a city.   

I think I’ll be prioritizing a garden again this year, though it’s still too cold now, but some things can be grown even on a window sill. 

 

If able to cook still, things like potatoes store quite awhile and can be great for a filling meal, white and deep colored ones both... nutritious skins too...   winter squash too would probably be

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Water not needed = things from cans and jars.  Soup, beans, fish, meat, canned veg, canned potatoes, peanut butter, apple sauce.  It's all heavy.  All can be safely eaten cold without cooking.  Great for shelter in place, not so good for bugging out. 

Also, dried foods that can be eaten without rehydrating/cooking like dried fruit, nuts, jerky.  Shelf stable starch that can be eaten without cooking like crackers and  rice cakes.  Ramen noodles are pretty tasty raw too.

 

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The issue for me is finding stuff my kids like enough to eat but don’t like so much they eat immediately

two minute noodles and microwaveable rice sachets, baked beans etc.  we do have a generator so I hope we can keep a freezer running in most circumstances.  Deep freeze is good for several days as well as long as you don’t open it too often. Plus we have chooks, so egg supply provided it isn’t avian flu or something.  I have a fair bit of rice, flour, yeast, dried beans and lentils that will work as long as we have water.  

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With our one experience like this I evacuated with the kids and dh stayed.  However he was actively fighting spot fires, watching, removing dangerous trees etc.  so it’s quite important to have low prep meals available.  He also didn’t find time for dishes etc so having disposable options (preferably than can be incinerated in case of no rubbish delivery) is a good plan to avoid coming home to a large mess.  (Although this is the same dude who didn’t wash up for 4 days while I was in hospital having a baby so ya know... maybe that’s just us )

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I have an up high on a shelf  box with “power outage” foods that I do try to rotate through so that foods in it don’t get too old or stale.  

 It has a few boxes of favorite crackers, and desirable beef jerky packs that would get eaten right up, buried under some powdered milk that is only appealing when there’s no other milk.  

We also have some good enough, but not highly desirable can soup

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Instant coffee and powdered creamer

A can of seasoned beans and a can of corn mixed together 

Canned chicken mixed with Red Hot sauce to taste, and served with tortilla chips or crackers

Canned potatoes, green beans & tuna with vinaigrette (over lettuce if you have it)

A can of white beans, jarred roasted red peppers and artichokes (olive oil, vinegar, s&p are shelf stable and make a good dressing)

Cashew or peanut butter to add protein to instant oatmeal

Granola bars or trail mix

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Tuna salad stuff- cans of tuna, mayo, pickles, and crackers

Chili stuff- canned beans, canned tomatoes, canned corn, dried lentils (instead of meat), seasonings of choice or a seasoning packet

Canned soups

Dried rice, beans, lentils

Oatmeal, maple syrup

Dried fruit and nuts

Bottled water

 

I feel relatively secure when I have stocks of the above items in the house.  I figure between eating through the fresh food/freezer, then moving on to the stocked food, I could feed us for about 2 weeks decently, and another week or so of just plain beans/lentils/rice.  

And while I don't spend a lot of time thinking about this, I could walk to a creek about five minutes from here and boil the water if I needed water.  It's not ideal, but neither would be the situation that required me to do that.  More tricky is that if the water is out, power is sure to be out also.  But I'm not going to start stocking charcoal, I'll just go chop down some trees with a steak knife or something if I need to.  

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I was making a list today. here is how far I have gotten on my list building:

Boxed soups (Trader Joe's, costco)

Canned beans (garbanzo, black and refried)

Madras lentils and crackers (big packs from costco: https://www.costco.com/organic-tasty-bite-madras-lentils%2C-10-oz%2C-8-count.product.100502845.html)

Nut butters (4 kinds)

Carrots (big bag in fridge, replace when it runs low so that there is always a supply) - they last a long while.

Overnight Oatmeal with Chia seeds in a jar (using bottled apple juice)

Pita chips, applesauce, Oranges, apples will last for a while.

Milk powder, chocolate milk powder, boxed ultra-pasteurized milk, almond milk in boxes.

Dry fruit: raisins, dates, apricots, dry berries, dry pineapple, banana chips, Kale chips

Huge bag of leftover chocolate from halloween and bag of baking chocolate chips in the pantry.

 

Edited by mathnerd
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Hot cocoa mix is good to keep on hand.  The Nestle brand has a decent amount of calcium per serving, (35% RDA per cup).  It's cheaper than keeping a lot of shelf-stable milk cartons on hand, and tastier than powdered milk *shudder* It also helps you feel a little bit better about life to have some hot cocoa when you're stuck without electricity. 

There are a lot of websites you can google to get lists of shelf-stable foods that can be prepared easily in an emergency. What you should keep on hand will vary depending on the sort of emergency and how long you could potentially be without services. The longest we had to go was 11 days without electricity, so I keep a minimum of 2 weeks of shelf-stable supplies and water on hand. I feel better with a month's worth, but space starts to become an issue with the water. 

 

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9 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

The issue for me is finding stuff my kids like enough to eat but don’t like so much they eat immediately

This is always my problem. I do resort to hiding some things, but there are only so many hiding places in a small house with a lot of people!

We did learn that every single person in the house finds dry milk disgusting, so I’ve kept a smaller amount for cooking purposes only. I have a few boxes of shelf stable milk and cans of evaporated milk but, again, that’s heavy and bulky, and in quantities that would only match a few days of what we might use in a normal week of fresh milk. Great for a short power glitch, but any shopping/delivery disruptions would mean prioritizing how it got used.

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Peanut butter & jelly. Can go on crackers or any type of bread. Canned meats: tuna, chicken, chili, etc.

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This is a good powdered milk: https://www.amazon.com/NESTLE-NIDO-Fortificada-Ounce-Canister/dp/B00FRFRZF6 .  Walmart has it, usually with Hispanic foods.

i stockpile food because I buy a lot when it is on sale and buy bulk at Costco. I dislike shopping, so then I go less.  I have lot of canned beans, tomatoes, some canned corn (for a corn bread recipe but I have a whole flat of corn), canned peaches, tuna, dried beans, lots of dried fruits and nuts (big bags from costco, plus I buy pecans from orchard in FL) and keep in a chest freezer.  I keep lots of butter in my freezer too.  I have dried beans, big cases of old fashioned oatmeal, plus some instant oatmeal, huge bags of rice from costco, cereals (buy ahead on sale), and lots of staples like flour, sugar, brown sugar.  I one time bought twenty 10-lb bags of white sugar.  They were on a really good sale and I do a lot of baking and make my own jam.  It lasted a long time, and I just finished that sugar a few months ago.  Have not seen another sale like that☹  i also have a couple 50 lb bags of wheat that I grind for bread flour.  We also have some camp stoves and fuel that we could use in an emergency.  I worry less about power outages, but it has occurred to me to stock up in case the virus hits and we do not want to expose ourselves while shopping. 

Other essentials to consider are kids multi vitamins, toilet paper, toothpaste, soap, sanitary products, etc.

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You might like the book The Storm Gourmet, which provides recipes using shelf stable items plus a bit of fresh citrus (author is in FL).

My storm prep Google doc (link in signature) has some food ideas as well.

Edited by whitehawk
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We could survive quite awhile as long as the power stayed on. Even the water wouldn't be an issue (well water that we can transfer too if needed) AS LONG AS WE HAVE POWER. 

BUT...

My crew would get so bored and probably mutinous. Food would become something we ate to stay alive, rather than something we enjoyed.

We have 2 freezers full of various meats.

We have a decent amount of frozen veggies and some fruits. 

We have chickens who lay eggs, thought they won't lay as well if we run out of layer ration. Especially if it is cold! They could forage well enough to stay alive but probably wouldn't lay.

If my cow would have her calf, we'd have milk and butter. 

If we were to have to lock down the world, Please let it be warm weather. I can grow lettuces and peas and tomatoes and such. But existing on meat and bread would be so boring. 

 

Stockpiling for me would be lots of ingredients:

Flour, salt, leaveners, fats (crisco and oils) Can get you various types of breads.

Oatmeal/grits can give you decent breakfasts, accompanies by egg if you have hens.

Meats plus canned veggies are a decent meal. Substitute dried beans if needed or don't have power to keep freezers cold. 

 

What scares me most about this scenario is that my dh is considered essential personnel for a utility, so it would be up to me and the kids to contrive most of this stuff. His utility even has MREs and cots in case things get too bad.  I do know that he would not leave me helpless. He'd set me up in advance with a generator and fuel. As long as I have that we'll be ok. We do have access to firewood if we need to campfire cook.

Edited by fairfarmhand
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I seriously doubt we'd see food issues in the USA.  But we will likely have prices spike on anything sourced from China.  Do you regularly buy anything from there?  You might want to stock up now.

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1 can black beans with liquid, 1 can diced tomatoes with liquid, 1 cup instant rice.  Put in pot and heat until rice is done.  Add cumin or other seasonings as desired.  I buy the seasoned diced tomatoes when I can.   Double and triple the recipe as needed.  I usually double it for two teen boys and two adults.  We eat it as bowl food with hot sauce.  

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26 minutes ago, Katy said:

I seriously doubt we'd see food issues in the USA.  But we will likely have prices spike on anything sourced from China.  Do you regularly buy anything from there?  You might want to stock up now.

If I’m not mistaken I think the op means “what if they tell us to stay home while a pandemic occurs.”

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8 hours ago, Katy said:

I seriously doubt we'd see food issues in the USA.  But we will likely have prices spike on anything sourced from China.  Do you regularly buy anything from there?  You might want to stock up now.

I think it’s more that this stuff gets people thinking about disaster preparedness and that’s not a bad thing 

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So in light of this thread I did a bit of stocking up today.  20kg of rice will probably be enough for a while 😆

grabbed some two minute noodles and tuna and spaghetti, plus lots of dettol.  Interestingly a lot of sanitiser and dettol stuff and bulk storage food was on sale and in prominent spots which makes me wonder if everyone is doing the same thing a bit.

i did realise chicken food is a weakness here.  Currently feeding about 60 chooks and 15 sheep.  But I guess if worst came to worst we would just eat them.

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10 hours ago, Katy said:

I seriously doubt we'd see food issues in the USA.  But we will likely have prices spike on anything sourced from China.  Do you regularly buy anything from there?  You might want to stock up now.

 

9 hours ago, fairfarmhand said:

If I’m not mistaken I think the op means “what if they tell us to stay home while a pandemic occurs.”

Yes, I took it as a “stay home” situation.
That said, if we’re playing What If, any slow down in interstate transportation would cause big food issues. We had *minor food supply issues during Sandy, nowhere near the center of it. And I really do mean minor (primarily dairy products), but it made me realize how delicate our system actually is.

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On 2/14/2020 at 8:54 PM, fairfarmhand said:

If I’m not mistaken I think the op means “what if they tell us to stay home while a pandemic occurs.”

 

Yes, this.  I should've been more specific in the title.  I included Cronovirus spinoff, but didn't explain further.

On 2/15/2020 at 6:43 AM, Carrie12345 said:

 

Yes, I took it as a “stay home” situation.
That said, if we’re playing What If, any slow down in interstate transportation would cause big food issues. We had *minor food supply issues during Sandy, nowhere near the center of it. And I really do mean minor (primarily dairy products), but it made me realize how delicate our system actually is.

 

Agreed.  We live in tornado alley and I was shockingly unprepared during last year's season.  This could turn into something scary and I would like to be prepared with at least the basics.  MRE's are great, but having a few basics my family knows and loves or at least tolerates would be spectacular.  I suspect if an all out pandemic broke out, one would need more than just a couple of weeks of basics food rations.

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1 hour ago, Excelsior! Academy said:

 

Yes, this.  I should've been more specific in the title.  I included Cronovirus spinoff, but didn't explain further.

 

Agreed.  We live in tornado alley and I was shockingly unprepared during last year's season.  This could turn into something scary and I would like to be prepared with at least the basics.  MRE's are great, but having a few basics my family knows and loves or at least tolerates would be spectacular.  I suspect if an all out pandemic broke out, one would need more than just a couple of weeks of basics food rations.

 

Anything that goes on shopping list for normal use is probably in category of being generally desirable.  You could get an extra of each as it comes up.  So if peanut butter comes up get a jar or two extra.  If a type of crackers, get a box or two extra.  To extent yo have space and it doesn’t go bad you could also be a bit ahead on things like eggs or foods you can freeze.  

Depending on how often you shop.  I usually do once per week so a double amount along with stuff already on shelves that’s maybe less appealing would last a few weeks. 

Think of comfort foods if sick too, and easy to make if sick.  

There’s no real reason imo  to think a quarantine would coincide with power outage and loss of running water such that you would actually need shelf stable food.  (Though that could be good for other emergencies.)

if quarantined, You can probably eat fairly normally other than maybe fresh salads if you utilize frozen meats, vegetables, fruits.  

 

 

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We have weather related power outages here with some frequency; a few years back a friend gave me the idea to have an "Iron Chef" style competition with my kids using ONLY THE INGREDIENTS in our "power outage box" + the camping stove. It's a LOT harder than cooking in a regular (using electricity) kitchen! Our little contest helped us learn what we like / don't like, helped convince the kids NOT to eat the power outage box food (LOL), *and* had the unexpected benefit of helping them be more easy-going on the recipes coming out of the camp stove / wood stove. Heh. 

Might actually be time for a refresher course, now that you mention it.

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54 minutes ago, Lucy the Valiant said:

We have weather related power outages here with some frequency; a few years back a friend gave me the idea to have an "Iron Chef" style competition with my kids using ONLY THE INGREDIENTS in our "power outage box" + the camping stove. It's a LOT harder than cooking in a regular (using electricity) kitchen! Our little contest helped us learn what we like / don't like, helped convince the kids NOT to eat the power outage box food (LOL), *and* had the unexpected benefit of helping them be more easy-going on the recipes coming out of the camp stove / wood stove. Heh. 

Might actually be time for a refresher course, now that you mention it.

 

We tested our emergency camping stove a few years ago, but did so in summer.  Our actual outages usually happen with pouring rain that has taken out power in slides or otherwise, and or thick heavy snow or ice that have snapped lines and poles.   And camp stove cooking is even less appealing to set up at such times. 

I like the fun contest idea though!!!

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I too will be planting a big garden this year, for the first time in many years.  I've already started my seed indoors and we've been eating some of the baby lettuce leaves that I started 3 weeks ago.  Gotta plant more now!

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Y'all are clearly picturing a much more roughing it situation than I have been. I stocked up on shelf stable staples because I figured that was a no lose proposition. We have the income cushion to spend a little more, as well as the space, though it's mildly annoying - it's not like we have a walk in pantry. With that in mind, getting more canned beans, canned tomatoes, boxed stock, rice, pasta, etc. seemed like a pretty low risk, potential high payoff thing to do because we'll eat that stuff.

Some of the things people are talking about here are things we simply would not eat unless we were in a situation where we were stuck inside without electricity for a prolonged period and unable to acquire more food.

But nowhere facing this thing has been hit in such a way that has affected water, electricity, etc. And while there have been some minor shortages, they've all been specific to medical supplies or have been the result of panic buying. In the end, the supply chain has worked out fine. I'm not anticipating anything more than the potential of a stretch of time when we're all practicing social avoidance and when maybe some stores are closed or have some item scarcity because of a run on goods before people are indoors for longer.

I also bought things that last a long time in the fridge - onions, carrots, potatoes, apples, etc. And my freezer is stocked.

If we really come down to the end of our stuff, we can eat rice and beans or pasta and jarred sauce.

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3 minutes ago, Farrar said:

Y'all are clearly picturing a much more roughing it situation than I have been. I stocked up on shelf stable staples because I figured that was a no lose proposition. We have the income cushion to spend a little more, as well as the space, though it's mildly annoying - it's not like we have a walk in pantry. With that in mind, getting more canned beans, canned tomatoes, boxed stock, rice, pasta, etc. seemed like a pretty low risk, potential high payoff thing to do because we'll eat that stuff.

Some of the things people are talking about here are things we simply would not eat unless we were in a situation where we were stuck inside without electricity for a prolonged period and unable to acquire more food.

But nowhere facing this thing has been hit in such a way that has affected water, electricity, etc. And while there have been some minor shortages, they've all been specific to medical supplies or have been the result of panic buying. In the end, the supply chain has worked out fine. I'm not anticipating anything more than the potential of a stretch of time when we're all practicing social avoidance and when maybe some stores are closed or have some item scarcity because of a run on goods before people are indoors for longer.

I also bought things that last a long time in the fridge - onions, carrots, potatoes, apples, etc. And my freezer is stocked.

If we really come down to the end of our stuff, we can eat rice and beans or pasta and jarred sauce.

 

I'm with you. I do not anticipate any water or power disruptions. I've been watching this unfold in China through my online students and those just aren't major concerns. I didn't even do a ton of canned goods just dried beans because they take up less room and I have an Instapot so...same same. I didn't buy anything we won't use within a month or two.

Edited by Sneezyone
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3 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

I'm with you. I do not anticipate any water or power disruptions. I've been watching this unfold in China through my online students and those just aren't major concerns. I didn't even do a ton of canned goods just dried beans because they take up less room and I have an Instapot so...same same. I didn't buy anything we won't use within a month or two.

I did buy more of some canned and dried goods that I think will last beyond a couple of months... but not beyond 6 months at the rate we usually use them. For some things, there's no way I can realistically keep them on hand. Like cereal or sweets. I could buy a six month supply and the kids would find a way to devour them in a week. I did get an extra Costco bag of chocolate chips.

But yeah... definitely not seeing the need for a ton of "emergency" meals. Maybe just a few with things you would normally have anyway.

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2 minutes ago, Farrar said:

I did buy more of some canned and dried goods that I think will last beyond a couple of months... but not beyond 6 months at the rate we usually use them. For some things, there's no way I can realistically keep them on hand. Like cereal or sweets. I could buy a six month supply and the kids would find a way to devour them in a week. I did get an extra Costco bag of chocolate chips.

But yeah... definitely not seeing the need for a ton of "emergency" meals. Maybe just a few with things you would normally have anyway.

 

I thought I was the only one, lol. I bought 6 boxes of cereal to last us two or three months and DS made short work of that. My kids will eat two or three bowls of cereal a day if it means not fixing a sandwich, frying an egg, or touching uncooked meat/veggies of any kind. I bought one bag of mini chocolate chips for pancakes and hid it behind nutritional yeast. I don't expect it to last a month. LOL.

Edited by Sneezyone
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4 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

I thought I was the only one, lol. I bought 6 boxes of cereal to last us two or three months and DS made short work of that. My kids will eat two or three bowls of cereal a day if it means not fixing a sandwich, frying an egg, or touching uncooked meat/veggies of any kind. I bought one bag of mini chocolate chips for pancakes and hid it behind nutritional yeast. I don't expect it to last a month. LOL.

Yeah, I can get like six boxes of cereal at Costco - so huge boxes - and in a week the kids are like, whine, there's nothing to have for breakfast, whine. And I'll be like... um... cereal? Whine whine, it's all gone, whine. 🙄

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We have the same problem with cereal. With 3 teen/tween eaters right now, just keeping them fed is an adventure in normal times.

When I was buying food for ds’s school’s food pantry, I discovered just-add-water tortilla mix for flour tortillas. (I had previously only seen this for corn tortillas.) I just wanted to throw that out there for rice and bean eaters.

 

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Have some of you tried decanting big things like cereal or potato chips into smaller, single-serving containers? I've found that can help the mindless eating of these convenience foods, because you can see that you've taken three servings and you know that Mom's going to ask why you didn't make an egg or have an apple instead.

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If I set limits, yes, my kids are respectful. For a long time we lived with a gallon jar full of ziplocks with cereal. But, honestly, with my teens they are eating eggs and nuts and cereal and apples for breakfast and are hungry afterwards. My boys are SKINNY and ravenous.

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Me --->  Stocking up on shelf stable items....

My kids --->  Mom bought junk food!!!  

3 days later --->  All junk food gone.

 

I usually keep a pretty stocked house, aside from fresh veggies.  We have a freezer full of beef and a well, so no need for bottled water.  Chickens for eggs.  I have been buying bulk for years bc we have so many kids!  I keep rice, beans, toiletries all on hand bc we live an hour from a Walmart Supercenter.  I often go 10 days without going to the store,  so a 2 week quarantine wouldn't be a big deal.  Much more than that, we would have to get creative!

My current plan, thinking we could have shortages or quarantines:

Canned fruit

Flour- I can easily use 20lbs and often buy in bulk

Broth- I'm getting low

Frozen veggies- 2 or 3 bags

Pizza sauce and freeze a few bags of cheese

Restock butter

Dried hashbrowns 

 

We all just had the flu, so I'm low on meds.  Need Advil and Robitussin.  I don't usually use Clorox wipes, but I think I'll get a pack for in the car.  And I hate the smell of Lysol type cleaners, but I may go ahead and buy some- I use Shaklee Basic G usually.  

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If you're thinking around two weeks...  (isn't that the coronavirus quarantine time?), then I'd have on hand:

3-4 bags of dried legumes (probably black beans, lentils, navy beans, pinto beans)

A lot of rice

Cans of vegetables

Cans of tomato sauce and crushed tomatoes

Potatoes (if not fresh, at least canned)

Spices: (Other than the obvious like salt and pepper, etc.) - Chili pepper, Dried onion, Garlic, Cumin

Enough oats for oatmeal for two weeks

Maple syrup or Honey

Peanut butter (We usually get refrigerated all-natural, but if non-refrigerated is a concern, then something like Jiffy, etc.)

Applesauce, other canned fruit

Bread (If freezer food is an option, which I'm assuming it would be, then regular bread;  otherwise, bread mix that you mix with water and bake, or tortillas, or rice cakes).

Tortillas, even if you have bread

Canned tuna, canned chicken

Salsa

Tortilla chips

Protein bars

Cookies

Crackers

Coffee

Instant milk

 

 

 

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