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Also, without testing it will be difficult to determine in how far people gain immunity after being exposed a first time. Knowing that would be helpful as for example people who have already had the disease could work with sick people with less worry.

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7 minutes ago, Renai said:

The thing is, COVID acts differently than regular flu. The change from "normal" to pneumonia  to death can be very rapid, within a couple of days. Knowing one has it, means they can look out for other symptoms or downturns and act rapidly, instead of thinking it's just regular flu they'll get over eventually. 


Who thinks shortness of breath is ever okay?!

If you develop any shortness of breath - go in! Flu or Covid19 or anything else - go in ASAP!

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5 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:


Who thinks shortness of breath is ever okay?!

If you develop any shortness of breath - go in! Flu or Covid19 or anything else - go in ASAP!

??  Can't.  I have shortness of breath.  My doc prescribed inhalers etc. sight unseen because in my hot spot it is more dangerous for me to come see him.  But while I have shortness of breath, I have a lot of other symptoms of non COVID19 and don't have the major symptoms of COVID19 like fever or a cough.  And yes, you can have shortness of breath without a cough. 

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On 3/5/2020 at 4:28 PM, Violet Crown said:

I don't think you're considering the importance of the hand sanitizer enabling.

ETA: Mayor A. could kill 2 birds with 1 stone by handing out free hand sanitizer to the homeless as a good will gesture.

Well, as he’s now declared a local disaster and cancelled SX, I guess we’ll never truly know the efficacy of said enabling. <dramatic sigh>

He certainly could. And yet somehow I don’t think his enabling extends quite that far. Maybe the downtown churches should lead the way on that. If this virus were to spread through the Arch, yeesh!

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I don't know if other people who live here will agree with me, but I think that the local news stations have done an excellent job covering COVID19.  They have explained what is going on where.  (Better than places like Life Care Center in Kirkland to their own patients and families.)  They  have put out warnings against panic and have explained the difference between prudent preparation and stockpiling which doesn't help.  They have given people timely information on shutdowns while also explaining some of the difficulties in making some of these decisions.  For example:  school closures.  Do you keep the school open if a staff member or student has been exposed knowing that for many families this means that their default childcare is the elderly who might them be exposed to more illness by these children?  And yet, parents have legitimate concerns and there are legitimate reasons to deep clean the facility. 

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5 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I don't know if other people who live here will agree with me, but I think that the local news stations have done an excellent job covering COVID19.  They have explained what is going on where.  (Better than places like Life Care Center in Kirkland to their own patients and families.)  They  have put out warnings against panic and have explained the difference between prudent preparation and stockpiling which doesn't help.  They have given people timely information on shutdowns while also explaining some of the difficulties in making some of these decisions.  For example:  school closures.  Do you keep the school open if a staff member or student has been exposed knowing that for many families this means that their default childcare is the elderly who might them be exposed to more illness by these children?  And yet, parents have legitimate concerns and there are legitimate reasons to deep clean the facility. 

and here - tech companies are telling their people to work from home.  there are advisories, by the county, large gatherings be cancelled, and people work from home. (heh - the freeway rush hour has been seriously reduced.)

dd is head of tech at her small company - she has to come up with a way for their "customer interface" dept to work from home  (phone/web) - only that takes money to implement.  their business has taken a hit because customers are staying home - but one customer who is carrying can make a lot of other people ill.

people don't seem to understand - you want to keep cases low, because if too many people require medical support - you have overwhelmed hospitals who just can't keep up with demand.

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13 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I don't know if other people who live here will agree with me, but I think that the local news stations have done an excellent job covering COVID19.  They have explained what is going on where.  (Better than places like Life Care Center in Kirkland to their own patients and families.)  They  have put out warnings against panic and have explained the difference between prudent preparation and stockpiling which doesn't help.  They have given people timely information on shutdowns while also explaining some of the difficulties in making some of these decisions.  For example:  school closures.  Do you keep the school open if a staff member or student has been exposed knowing that for many families this means that their default childcare is the elderly who might them be exposed to more illness by these children?  And yet, parents have legitimate concerns and there are legitimate reasons to deep clean the facility. 

I agree with you that  the news here has been informative, and I think trying hard to give people up to date information and not cause panic. Same with the press conferences from King County and the State health departments. 

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16 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I don't know if other people who live here will agree with me, but I think that the local news stations have done an excellent job covering COVID19.  They have explained what is going on where.  (Better than places like Life Care Center in Kirkland to their own patients and families.)  They  have put out warnings against panic and have explained the difference between prudent preparation and stockpiling which doesn't help.  They have given people timely information on shutdowns while also explaining some of the difficulties in making some of these decisions.  For example:  school closures.  Do you keep the school open if a staff member or student has been exposed knowing that for many families this means that their default childcare is the elderly who might them be exposed to more illness by these children?  And yet, parents have legitimate concerns and there are legitimate reasons to deep clean the facility. 

Agreed. I have also appreciated the state and county health department briefings, and how open they have been that on many issues, they just don't know what's going to happen. 

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More cases from the Grand Princess early trip.

https://abc7news.com/5991100/

“Contra Costa Health Services (CCHS) has announced three additional confirmed cases in the county. Two of the patients were on the Grand Princess cruise ship in Mexico, and the other patient had close contact with another COVID-19 patient in another jurisdiction.”

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1 hour ago, Murphy101 said:

While I understand why some want more Covid19 testing available for data purposes, I think it is smart of them to stop doing it.  Especially once it is endemic in the area.  People need to just stay the heck home and avoid any medical facility as much as possible.  Every time staff is seeing someone who doesn’t have a serious need, they are risking getting more overloaded and spreading contagion.   Given how much regular flu season strains medical services in areas, they have to look at the best use of their time to actually help patients - and that’s going to be treating them for the respiratory problems they are having in hopes of saving their life.  There’s also no small financial cost to consider too.

Even if there were a home test, I wouldn’t buy it.  If sick, stay the home unless breathing issues start.  Approx 20% are going to need medical intervention to live, and 3-4% are going to die even with medical intervention.  And while all their lives matter and we will grieve them, the Covid19 test won’t save them.  But way more than 4-20% are going to panic if they test positive and that totally could raise the number of people seen by overworked medical systems unnecessarily. 

My theory is that, if I could test for it and dd could, since we were just in an area that has it, we could be more certain we’re not carrying it asymptomatically. I am staying the heck home, to a point, but the worry about being an asympt. carrier does niggle at the back of my mind. And I’m not under full quarantine, just being conscientious about social distancing so, theoretically, my dh or ds may be infected and none of us knows this yet. 

Or dd...she is back teaching at the French school. Since she’s not under literal quarantine, she goes back. But if there were a home test kit, she could know if she’s carrying it before going back to the schools. 

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1 hour ago, prairiewindmomma said:

On the bleaching produce directions, I haven't seen how long I need to soak produce.  I'm assuming at this point that everything we buy in the store has been coughed or sneezed on.  I have the right dilution rate, but how long should I let stuff soak?  Should I feel confident about this process, or should we just move to stuff we can peel/frozen/canned stuff? Thoughts? We're in this for the next few months and I don't want to unnecessarily give up good nutrition. 

 

I don’t know if it’s known.

I decided to use soap and water on some recently purchased apples.  If it works for my hands it should work for my Apples.  Even though peelable I should probably do same for outsides of things like grapefruits just so they aren’t being fomites spreading virus.   (ETA:Also, I haven’t been peeling them.  I have been cutting in half and eating out segments with spoon, using my hands to touch the fruits. Hmmm.) 

For some greens I got, I stir fried them, so I presume heat will do it.

I have not decided to what to do about lettuce.  

Possibly a soak in food grade H2O2 for around 10 minutes.  I think I saw 10 min as being contact time for H2O2 ???  Or are you using chlorine type bleach - in which case I have no idea how long, but there was a paper that gave contact times for cmvarious  disinfectants.   Upthread. Somewhere.  

Or experiment with even longer? If it doesn’t hurt the vegetables then there doesn’t seem like any reason not to go longer. 

What bleach and what dilution are you using?  I wish I knew if vinegar would work on this too. 

Lettuce/mixed greens were the only delicate raw eating item I bought.  

And I also bought a lettuce seedling starts 6-pack which can start giving home lettuce sooner than I can get if going from seed (I have plant start lights, but haven’t felt up to doing my own late winter starts in preparation for spring garden in recent years.) Though, of course, purchased seedlings could also already be carrying Covid virus  too, but they have been rained on and gotten sunshine so probably are fine.  And the many people I encountered shopping and working at nursery weren’t coughing all over the place like at DMV and post office. 

 

Based on what Beachgal wrote here about ozonator, I got one for ~$50 that is supposed to be able to ozonate water which can then be used to clean vegetables and fruits . 

(ETA- and also, dry version in a box,  I hope, things like back packs and schoolbooks that have been to public school.   ) 

 

I personally think we are probably okay with the bleach cleaned vegetables.  And I think there’s a health benefit both physical and psychological from fresh foods. 

I think maybe next shopping trip I will still get fresh greens, but I think I’ll try to disinfect them as soon possible upon arrival home probably so they go already bleached into fridge (so I say, but didn’t do it myself! Because by time I got home I was tired and gave priority to getting my self cleaned up). 

Btw, a friend of mine doing commercial scale organic growing had to get a produce bleaching system, which she felt was contrary to “organic” concept. But clearly it was considered important to not spread germs.  So that’s probably already being relied on significantly for commercial produce.  

Now, the way I look at it, we are adding a final bleach wash time due to being in community spread state.  I think probably it is enough.  🙏

ETA: Or perhaps I think we will probably most of us get the Covid, but I think other transmission routes much more likely than from a bleach treated salad. 

 

Edited by Pen

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I think we could use some drive through testing stations like South Korea set up.  Less risk and exposure. Then if someone who knows they have Covid-19 needs hospital support  (even if for a broken bone or something else totally unrelated) they would know for sure they need Covid-19 precautions taken to not infect staff and other patients. 

Available Home test kits would be even better IMO. 

Edited by Pen
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19 minutes ago, Quill said:

My theory is that, if I could test for it and dd could, since we were just in an area that has it, we could be more certain we’re not carrying it asymptomatically. I am staying the heck home, to a point, but the worry about being an asympt. carrier does niggle at the back of my mind. And I’m not under full quarantine, just being conscientious about social distancing so, theoretically, my dh or ds may be infected and none of us knows this yet. 

Or dd...she is back teaching at the French school. Since she’s not under literal quarantine, she goes back. But if there were a home test kit, she could know if she’s carrying it before going back to the schools. 

 

Right!

Great example!

So easy testing could help hugely to slow spread!

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My kids' pediatrician just sent out this note:

Quote

Important COVID-19 Update for Patients & Families
As [State] has reported confirmed case(s) of COVID-19, [Pediatrian Office] continues to actively plan, prepare and take action to control and prevent the spread of illness. Our top priority is keeping our patients, families, staff and community safe. We have recently implemented the following changes to be responsive and responsible in that commitment to safety. While we understand and appreciate the inconvenience some of these updates may cause families, safety is our number one goal.

Have an outpatient or primary care appointment in the next 2 weeks?
As a precaution to protect the community, [Pediatrian Office] is following recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If your child has an appointment scheduled within the next 14 days at our [Pediatrian Office] AND you have traveled outside of the United
States in the last 30 days or been in contact with anyone who has traveled outside of the United States AND you or your child have signs
of illness, please contact the [Pediatrian Office] location to complete a travel and wellness screening over the phone prior to coming in for your scheduled appointment. This short screening involves just three questions and will take just a few moments. You'll be asked about your history of travel and if anyone in your household has fever, cough or shortness of breath. If you have any questions about your appointment, please reach out to your provider's office directly.


Updated Visitor Protocol at [Pediatrian Office]
All individuals entering [Pediatrian Office] will be screened upon arrival. If there are two adults in the party with multiple children, one adult will be asked to take the other children to the car, and one adult will be allowed to remain with the patient for the visit.

They also said that they are closing entrances at the Children's Hospital so there are only two points of entry - one of them being the ER. Everyone will be screened in their cars (or upon coming into the front door) & they are closing playrooms, not allowing siblings unless absolutely necessary, and several other things. 

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I'm in Seattle.  I always do my weekly grocery shopping  early Sat. morning.  When I got there at about 7am this morning the parking lot had more cars than usual.   After hearing reports about panic buying on tv I was kind of nervous about whether I'd be able to get the gluten free items I normally buy as well as things like lactose-free milk.  It was a relief to find that there were no food supply problems , and the stockers were still there unloading lots of boxes in the aisles.  The store was sold out of all types of hand sanitizers and rubbing alcohol, and they had signs posted about limiting the purchase of sanitizing wipes and cleaners to 5 per person but the shelves were still mostly full of all kinds of sanitizing wipes and sprays.  I was really glad that I'm a coupon shopper and had stocked up on Wet Ones at the last sale and my coupons were the "buy 2 and save" kind.  

I didn't see anyone wearing a mask.   One elderly couple had disposable gloves on but no masks.  And when I put my cart in the cart return in the parking lot I noticed a used wipe in most of them (which bugged me because there are also garbage cans out in the parking lot).   It's nice that the stores provide these wipes at the entrance and it looks like more people are using them!

Yesterday I went to the gas station, and for the first time I used one of the plastic "gas mitts".  (I first noticed boxes of these near the pumps back in the fall, before any of the bad news from Wuhan.)

 

 

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27 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

My kids' pediatrician just sent out this note:

They also said that they are closing entrances at the Children's Hospital so there are only two points of entry - one of them being the ER. Everyone will be screened in their cars (or upon coming into the front door) & they are closing playrooms, not allowing siblings unless absolutely necessary, and several other things. 

I’m pretty sure that is the new CDC guidelines given to hospitals. All of the hospitals in my city have either already started or will start doing this on Monday. They all met together to make sure they were on the same page. Guidelines are constantly changing so they are making sure they keep up. 

 

Speaking of CDC recommendations....it’s very broad request, not specific to certain areas where people have tested positive. 

(CNN)Amid a coronavirus outbreak in the United States, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is encouraging older people and people with severe chronic medical conditions to "stay at home as much as possible."

This advice is on a CDC website that was posted Thursday, according to a CDC spokeswoman.
 
ETA its from a High Risk page on the CDC website. When the survey popped up a few days ago I had requested a high risk page. I’m sure I wasn’t the only one. 
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https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/health-and-medicine/article240990186.html

“Of the 3,533 people stuck aboard, the age ranges for the 21 who have tested positive are: Three passengers ages 21 to 29 years old; four people who are 30 to 39; six who are 40 to 49; six who are 50 to 59; one who is between 60 and 69; and one between 70 and 79 years old.

About 46 people out of the roughly 3,500 passengers and crew members identified as most at risk aboard the Grand Princess were tested first. All of the passengers will be tested at some point.”

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https://abc7news.com/health/live-coronavirus-updatescritically-ill-guest-from-grand-princess-cruise-evacuated/5906450/

“11:00 a.m.

First COVID-19 case confirmed in Santa Cruz County, officials say


A Santa Cruz County resident who recently traveled on the Grand Princess cruise ship from Feb. 11 to 21 is the county's first confirmed case of COVID-19, officials said Saturday. County officials are investigating any possible exposures the resident may have had with others and say all are being monitored and under self-quarantine. Authoities have not released any further information about the patient.

10:00 a.m.

'Critically ill guest' evacuated from Grand Princess cruise


The captain on the Grand Princess cruise ship announced at 7:15 a.m. that they have successfully evacuated a critically "ill guest" from the ship. The captain also confirmed that supplies were dropped off by the U.S. Coast Guard last night. There's still no official word on when or where the cruise ship will dock. Yesterday, Vice President Mike Pence announced that 21 people, 19 crew members and two passengers tested positive for coronavirus.”

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14 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/health-and-medicine/article240990186.html

“Of the 3,533 people stuck aboard, the age ranges for the 21 who have tested positive are: Three passengers ages 21 to 29 years old; four people who are 30 to 39; six who are 40 to 49; six who are 50 to 59; one who is between 60 and 69; and one between 70 and 79 years old.

About 46 people out of the roughly 3,500 passengers and crew members identified as most at risk aboard the Grand Princess were tested first. All of the passengers will be tested at some point.”

I’m confused on this. Have they only tested 46 people, and of those, 21 of them were positive?

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Just now, kand said:

I’m confused on this. Have they only tested 46 people, and of those, 21 of them were positive?

Yes. They only tested 46. 21 positive and 1 uncertain. 

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On 3/6/2020 at 7:19 AM, Pawz4me said:

 

I can't decide if it's massive incompetence or intentional slow walking of widespread testing. Or perhaps some of both.

Yeah, it’s really hard to know if Hanlon’s razor is in play. 

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I am about to go spend the night in a big room with 350 kids (Girl Scout NASA overnight). Wish me and my immune system luck (from all the nasties!) Wheeeeee!🤪

Also, USA Gymnastics put out a statement saying, basically, y'all decide what's going to happen about meets. So...We know no more than we did before. 

SXSW canceled, but Rodeo is going full swing (Houston rodeo is a HUGE multi-week event, with concerts, rodeo events, rides, food - over 2 million people attend per year.) We know we've had cases here, I suspect there are MANY more, probably asymptomatic or mild - we have a huge international population as well as tons of business travel. So...I'll be watching with interest to see what happens. 😳 

OK!! Done with my frantic obsessing until tomorrow night! 🙄🙄🙄🙄 (There aren't enough eyerolls in the world.)

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1 hour ago, Pen said:

Based on what Beachgal wrote here about ozonator, I got one for ~$50 that is supposed to be able to ozonate water which can then be used to clean vegetables and fruits . 

(ETA- and also, dry version in a box,  I hope, things like back packs and schoolbooks that have been to public school.   ) 

 

A reputable ozone generator will cost about $1,000. Longevity is one company that sells them. Yours might be fine for cleaning. To be sure, you could poke around Dr. Rowen’s Facebook page. I don’t have Facebook but I know he discusses ozone therapy there. I do not own any of these devices myself (yet). 🙂

Frank Shallenberger has written a book about ozone that explains it more thoroughly.

I think the Agarikon is wonderful stuff. It’s sold by Paul Stamets’ company Host Defense.

And I'm going to try making my own liposomal vitamin C and experiment with that.

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2 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

 

A reputable ozone generator will cost about $1,000. Longevity is one company that sells them. Yours might be fine for cleaning. To be sure, you could poke around Dr. Rowen’s Facebook page. I don’t have Facebook but I know he discusses ozone therapy there. I do not own any of these devices myself (yet). 🙂

Frank Shallenberger has written a book about ozone that explains it more thoroughly.

I think the Agarikon is wonderful stuff. It’s sold by Paul Stamets’ company Host Defense.

And I'm going to try making my own liposomal vitamin C and experiment with that.

 

I am only trying to do some limited cleaning, not ozone therapy.  I don’t do FB either.  I’ll look for the book though. Thanks!

Agarikon sounds interesting too.  

 

I would love to know how to make Liposomal C!

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“Two passengers were evacuated Saturday morning off the stricken Grand Princess cruise ship, which has been held off the coast of Northern California after 21 of its passengers tested positive for coronavirus, according to news reports.

Princess Cruises said Saturday morning that “a critically ill U.S. guest and their travel companion were medically disembarked from Grand Princess earlier this morning by a U.S. Coast Guard cutter.” The company said they are being transported to an area hospital, but provided no further details”

https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/health-and-medicine/article240990186.html

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3 minutes ago, StellaM said:

 

People with chronic lung disease, lol. 

I often have some shortness of breath. It can be really hard to determine what's just my normal or expected progression in my normal, which only needs at home physio, 'cos there's nothing else to be done, and what is infection-caused and not normal and needs hospital now. I reckon it gets harder when there's peaks in community disease, because then you have to weigh up the risks of exposure in the ED to risks of waiting to see a GP. 

 

 


I can understand that. I had to quit grocery shopping this afternoon bc I’m so short of breath I was having a hard time maintaining momentum and getting foggy headed.  I suspect it’s a combination of residual issues from the colds my house is recovering from and allergies due to the sudden nice weather today combining to aggravate my asthma more than usual. So I came home, used my inhaler, put pajamas on and plan to knitflex.

BUT if I had a fever or other sick symptoms, I’d be calling my dr to see if I need to do more.  I wouldn’t ignore it or wait and see.  If it got worse after usual treatment and rest, I wouldn’t wait.

Would you not do the same?  I think that’s the part I’m questioning or confused by. 

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What I learned this week about trying to build an inventory of prescription meds:

So disabled dd takes 5 meds regularly (mostly antiseizures). She has prescription coverage through dh's insurance but also has Medicaid which pays her copays, but will only let her get a month's worth of meds at a time. I tried to order her meds a little earlier this month, but when I went to pick them up I found that her secondary wouldn't pay yet--we were filling them too early. A nice pharmacist explained to me that she has found that the magic formula is to count 30 days from when the insurance was last processed then count back 6 days--that's when they'll let you process again. I was able to get them Friday and I can get the next month's supply on the 31st. Now that I know the formula I will keep ordering the earliest possible date.

Edited by Ali in OR
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Coronavirus math--here's an interview with a mathematician who studies the spread of disease. When the first case in any given area is a death or severe case, there are likely 500-1000 cases in that community already.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/05/health/coronavirus-deaths-rates.html?action=click&module=Top Stories&pgtype=Homepage

If you were the average person, what would you pay attention to — in terms of the news and the numbers?

One signal to watch out for is if the first case in an area is a death or a severe case, because that suggests you had a lot of community transmission already. As a back of the envelope calculation, suppose the fatality rate for cases is about 1 percent, which is plausible. If you’ve got a death, then that person probably became ill about three weeks ago. That means you probably had about 100 cases three weeks ago, in reality. In that subsequent three weeks, that number could well have doubled, then doubled, then doubled again. So you’re currently looking at 500 cases, maybe a thousand cases.

I think the other thing that people do need to pay attention to is the risk of severe disease and fatality, particularly in older groups, in the over-70s, over-80s. Over all we’re seeing maybe 1 percent of symptomatic cases are fatal across all ages. There’s still some uncertainty on that, but what’s also important is that 1 percent isn’t evenly distributed. In younger groups, we’re talking perhaps 0.1 percent, which means that when you get into the older groups, you’re potentially talking about 5 percent, 10 percent of cases being fatal.

In thinking about social behavior and thinking about your interactions, the question should be, “How do we stop transmission getting into those groups where the impact could be really severe?”

Edited by Acadie
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https://abc7news.com/health/live-coronavirus-updatescritically-ill-guest-from-grand-princess-cruise-evacuated/5906450/

“1 p.m. 

Saleforce employees asked to work from home


San Francisco-based Salesforce is encouraging employees across California and Washington to work from home for the rest of March as a precaution against coronavirus”

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@Pen@Pawz4me@Acadie@Terabith

https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/article/Coronavirus-live-updates-Six-dead-in-Washington-15100710.php

“12:50 p.m. More than 1 million test kits sent to private labs: The Food and Drug Administration reports that the federal government has shipped enough test kits to state public health laboratories to test 75,000 people. As of Saturday, 1,583 people had been tested by state labs.

In addition, 1.1 million tests have been sent to non-public health labs, meaning facilities run by hospitals, universities and other public and private institutions; that’s enough to test roughly half a million people, according to the FDA. The manufacturer of the 1.1 million tests is IDT, a Virginia-based testing company. The first batch of those tests were sent to California and Washington, which have the most cases in the country so far.

The FDA said IDT hoped to ship another batch of 400,000 tests on Monday. A second manufacturer expected to ship 640,000 tests, also on Monday.”

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I work for Rosetta Stone from home and they have offices internationally. They already closed an office in Italy, and we got an email this morning saying the Seattle office will be closed and to work out how to work from home. No one has been tested positive, just doing so out of abundance of caution since it is a people business. They keep us updated constantly; they started with travel advisories a couple of weeks ago.

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6 minutes ago, Renai said:

I work for Rosetta Stone from home and they have offices internationally. They already closed an office in Italy, and we got an email this morning saying the Seattle office will be closed and to work out how to work from home. No one has been tested positive, just doing so out of abundance of caution since it is a people business. They keep us updated constantly; they started with travel advisories a couple of weeks ago.

 

IMO that sounds

Good.  

I like hearing about some proactive action rather than only reactive.

 

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A friend in Seattle said the city bus system her husband and works for is telling all employees over 60 to stay home from work. Supposedly both Cali and WA are discussing possibly using work compensation programs to help people suffering income loss due to closures or quarantine guidelines. 

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5 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

A friend in Seattle said the city bus system her husband and works for is telling all employees over 60 to stay home from work. Supposedly both Cali and WA are discussing possibly using work compensation programs to help people suffering income loss due to closures or quarantine guidelines. 

California https://edd.ca.gov/about_edd/coronavirus-2019.htm

e.g. 
“Reduced Work Hours 

If your employer has reduced your hours or shut down operations due to COVID-19, you can file an Unemployment Insurance (UI) claim. UI provides partial wage replacement benefit payments to workers who lose their job or have their hours reduced, through no fault of their own. Workers who are temporarily unemployed due to COVID-19 and expected to return to work with their employer within a few weeks are not required to actively seek work each week. However, they must remain able and available and ready to work during their unemployment for each week of benefits claimed and meet all other eligibility criteria. Eligible individuals can receive benefits that range from $40-$450 per week.”

Edited by Arcadia
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2 new cases in NSW

The new cases include: 

A male in his 60s who recently returned from Italy and is currently under investigation. 

A second male in his 40s who is a known close contact of a previously confirmed case. He travelled on two domestic flights on 28 February while symptomatic but before he had been identified as a close contact.

Flight 1: 6.45am QF1509 Sydney to Canberra and Flight 2: 2.35pm VA651 Canberra to Sydney.

NSW Health is asking anyone seated in rows 2-6 in the first flight or rows 3-7 in the second flight to self-isolate and call their local public health unit for further guidance on 1300 066 055.

Anyone else travelling on these flights in other rows are not considered to be close contacts and should monitor their health until 13 March and to contact their GP for assessment and testing if they develop any symptoms.

NSW Health is continuing to find and respond to cases as they are diagnosed to slow any spread of COVID-19 in the community.

More information about close contact and casual contact is available on the NSW Health website.

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“The safest way to clean your phone without hurting your device is to use a soft, lint-free cloth with warm water and soap, according to Apple.” According to:

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/21/disinfectant-wipes-damage-smartphone-screen-how-to-clean-phone-germs.html

and:

“So more than cleaning your phone, avoiding bringing your phone into the bathroom "would be a boon for public health," Martin says. You should also wash your hands after using the bathroom, whether you have your phone or not. (Studies suggest 30% of people don't wash their hands after using the toilet.)”

 

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1 minute ago, Pen said:

 

“The safest way to clean your phone without hurting your device is to use a soft, lint-free cloth with warm water and soap, according to Apple.” According to:

 

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/02/21/disinfectant-wipes-damage-smartphone-screen-how-to-clean-phone-germs.html

and:

“So more than cleaning your phone, avoiding bringing your phone into the bathroom "would be a boon for public health," Martin says. You should also wash your hands after using the bathroom, whether you have your phone or not. (Studies suggest 30% of people don't wash their hands after using the toilet.)”

 


We need a “gag” button vs that thumbs up for stuff like this. 

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2 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:


We need a “gag” button vs that thumbs up for stuff like this. 

 

Like: 🤢🤮?

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I keep my phone in a pocket in public toilet facilities— but ... what about my jacket, what about my jeans?  I’m not even especially thinking of influenza or Covid, just general 🤢 

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2 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

Like: 🤢🤮?


I meant in addition to these 5 buttons. 😊

005608FE-34E0-4BDA-8F71-EAF891BA042F.jpeg

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1 minute ago, Pen said:

I keep my phone in a pocket in public toilet facilities— but ... what about my jacket, what about my jeans?  I’m not even especially thinking of influenza or Covid, just general 🤢 


Yeah but you don’t usually put your jeans right up against your ear/mouth/face - the major entry point of germs.

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https://www.nbclosangeles.com/news/local/carnival-cruise-ship-debarkation-stalled-at-long-beach-harbor-due-to-medical-matter/2324722/

“Local news from across Southern California

"There is a medical matter with a Carnival Panorama guest that caused authorities to suspend debarkation. The guest in question does not meet CDC criteria for coronavirus risk, but officials still have questions.  Our shoreside medical team is in direct contact with authorities and we hope to debark shortly," Carnival Cruise Media Relations said in a statement. 

As of 1 p.m., passengers were still stuck on board the cruise ship. Passengers said they were returning from a cruise from Mexican Riviera. 

In a later statement the Carnival Cruise Media Relations said, "We’ve advised our guests currently on Carnival Panorama that their debarkation will be delayed until at least 6pm PST related to a medical situation with one of our debarking  guests.  While we cannot discuss their specific condition, they are a U.S. citizen who has not traveled internationally, and does not meet the CDC criteria that puts them in an at risk category for coronavirus.  Nevertheless, based on an evaluation at a local hospital, medical authorities want to administer a COVID-19 test out of an abundance of caution."”

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Just now, Murphy101 said:


Yeah but you don’t usually put your jeans right up against your ear/mouth/face - the major entry point of germs.

 

Youngsters often put their faces on parent legs

Many people touch hands on own pants and thence eyes, nose, mouth

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Just now, Pen said:

 

Youngsters often put their faces on parent legs

Many people touch hands on own pants and thence eyes, nose, mouth


True but that would be second or third contact, not direct contact. One can only do so much. 

I mean even if they were naked and we had some kind of sanitation hazmat bathroom stall system that when you flush it automatically sprays some kind of disinfectant fog into the room and you can’t open the door to leave until a 30-60 second timer releases the lock - that would be freaking awesome. But we don’t have that. Dammit.

I’ve often pondered how to convert mud rooms or laundry areas near entry ways to a mini hazmat cleans system of some sort. I mean really, I can’t be the only mom watching bus loads of sniffling kids in the am at bus stops who ponders stuff like this?

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case in Washington DC
 

Late this afternoon, testing at the Public Health Lab at the DC Department of Forensic Sciences yielded its first presumptive positive coronavirus (COVID-19) case. Join me live at 7:30 p.m. for a briefing at the John A. Wilson Building.

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