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21 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

It’s possible that they are claiming something else is wrong until the ambulances arrive. I’ve seen people in the emergency claiming to be ill until the nurse told them there were no sandwiches left and then they left to try elsewhere.  

That definitely happens.  But our sandwich crowd (and our use the ambulance as a taxi to get into town crowd) tend to all be regulars.  It would be weird for that population to suddenly spike, I think.

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On 8/27/2021 at 7:32 PM, BeachGal said:

Of those of you HCWs working with Covid patients, are you noticing that fewer patients are being extubated now than the earlier waves a year ago? I am reading some other HCW accounts and — oof. Delta is doing a number on the unvaccinated in hospitals.

There’s a large thread on Reddit, r/nursing, where *many* nurses are saying exactly that. Like less than 5% of Covid patients now are being successfully extubated, no matter their age or how healthy they are(were). And, yes, the vast majority are unvaccinated. 

Obviously, that’s anecdotal, but it’s a rather sobering thread and reflects what you’ve seen. 

It’s also mind-blowing (not in a good way) to do a FB search for terms like, “died from Covid today u.s.” or “Covid prayers”, etc and then select “Posts”. Brings it home on a more personal level. A lot of younger people (30’s - 50’s)  passing. 
 

 

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23 minutes ago, Melissa Louise said:

I'm getting so anxious I can't sleep. I'm scared one if us will need the hospital and won't be able to access timely or effective care. 

I've had my specialist appt cancelled - my specialist is on Covid wards. Ex just had an urgent surgery cancelled (narrowed fistula, can't effectively do dialysis).

Education Minister on the radio soothing everyone: schools are safe! 

In primary, they are going to do the same marginally effective things they did last year - have a cleaner trailing a rag around door handles, ban assemblies, tell kids to stay home if unwell. At least staff-student masking might help in high schools. And staff masking in primary might help with staff-staff transmission. 

I’m so sorry. I imagine at some point soon extra health care workers may come in from other states if needed.  Im sorry about the cancellations though that is pretty sucky.  

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2 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-30/elective-surgery-postponed-wa-hospital-covid/100417518
 

Apparently WA are having to postpone elective surgeries in regional hospitals even without Covid.

It's not just regional, it's all Perth public hospitals as well. We are screwed when we have a Covid outbreak here.

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7 hours ago, Melissa Louise said:

Sedation being used to manage patient load. Not a sign of a robust hc system. 

 

Screenshot_2021-08-30-09-45-56-87.jpg

At least in the US, nurses cannnot increase dosages more than what was already prescribed by a doctor.  In some cases, this might be a range but they can't exceed that range. 

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On 8/26/2021 at 10:24 AM, Corraleno said:

It's 100K just with covid, not counting other causes:

"More than 100,000 people are hospitalized with covid-19 in the United States, a level not seen since Jan. 30 — when coronavirus vaccines were not widely available — as the country grapples with the delta variant’s spread.

Hospitalizations are highest across the South, where every state in the region has a higher portion of its population currently hospitalized with covid-19 than the national level, according to a Washington Post database. More than 17,000 people are hospitalized with covid-19 in Florida, which has the most hospitalizations for covid-19 of any state in the country, followed by Texas, which has more than 14,000."

Oh I know,.  I was just saying the hospitals are also even more stressed by at least the RSV and the trauma of increased violent crimes since same time  2020.  And anything else that needs treatment such as all the regular heart attack, stroke, and bacteria patients.  One man in my church just went into the hospital because of a bacterial infection from a six month surgery.

I hope we can keep Dh out of the hospital but his orbital cellulitis needs to respond by this coming morning when he has already had 2 Cephalaxin 500mg yesterday.  

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14 minutes ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

At least in the US, nurses cannnot increase dosages more than what was already prescribed by a doctor.  In some cases, this might be a range but they can't exceed that range. 

I think they are not exceeding the range here, either, but sedating to the maximum of the range. 

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On 8/26/2021 at 3:47 PM, MissLemon said:

My cousin's spouse insisted he felt fine despite the pulse ox reading 81%. He ended up hospitalized for about a week, only because she argued with him about it and wouldn't let up.

When you don't have enough oxygen going to your brain, you can't figure out that you need help. 

DD2 who was sick in March 2020 but not with COVID was sort of arguing w/ds about how she didn't need to go anywhere when her lips were turning blue.  He had to force her into the car and drive her to the ER.  Being sick, she wasn't as careful with what she drank and the drink she was used to buying to drink had changed its ingredients and added a citrus into the berry drink. She was having an anaphylactic reaction and yes, her oxygen was very low as was her bp.  

It is actually pretty common with loss of oxygen in brain, which can be from lung issues or very low bp or stroke, etc , gets people to just want to sit there and not go anywhere, often.

 

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On 8/26/2021 at 4:36 PM, Rosie_0801 said:

I beg your pardon. I thought people had mentioned having to pay earlier in this thread.

Ir depends on where you get tested if it costs anything.  Some places here do charge money- generally people go to those places because they need a test for something like travel or going back to work (never had COVID symptoms or close contact w/someone),  Insurance will only pay if you have some symptoms that may be COVID or you have had close contact with someone,  

Who is paying what for COVID is changing rapidly here in the states.  States keep going in and out of emergency declarations- I think my state's emergency status ending in June and was re-instated on a more limited basis about two weeks ago.  (It now just pertains to issues like medical staffing-we are accepting licenses from other states on an emergency basis, being able to ask FEMA and others for emergency help with COVID, (( and now we have another emergency declaration with Hurricane IDA too)) and other specific medical issues---- no mandates on public at all).  

But as maybe mentioned in this thread and certainly in some of the other COVID related threads, co=pays and deductibles are coming back w/ COVID treatments.  

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On 8/26/2021 at 6:07 PM, Ausmumof3 said:

That is encouraging!  Are you using proper N95s though or cloth/standard surgical masks?

One model I read implied about 8x reduction with masking and 16x with an open window.  It’s the sealed up stuffiness of the school environments here thats bothering me.

On a separate non Covid note I’ve come across a lot of info on sick building syndrome with modern buildings designed for energy efficiency with air conditioning and heating etc and not having adequate ventilation and it’s playing on my mind a lot.  I do think there was more wisdom than we give credit for in the late 19th century obsession with air quality.

And there was a study in Spain done in a crowded dance party but with super great ventilation last December and not a single person got COVID.  

I know that transmission on planes is super, super low too because of the air being refreshed with outside air completely every 10 minutes.  

We had a uv light system installed in our air ducts  about three years ago and that cuts down on transmission too and I think some places have been adding those and just more circulation.

I never thought that the whole totally sealed buildings with poor circulation were a good idea. I know I used to get headaches in the relatively new building in the late 80s where I worked for Epson accessory sales than I did at the probably sixty year old sheriff station where I volunteered as a crime analyst.

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On 8/26/2021 at 8:34 PM, Ausmumof3 said:

Sounds like they are really emphasising masking so that should be good.  I’m disappointed about the total lack I’d focus on ventilation in Australia - feels like we’re a long way behind on this than the rest of the world. 

Oh not very many public health announcements here on ventilation at all.  Just the standard 3ft to 6 ft (should be really 9 ft or more) distance, masking, vaccine, and washing your hands-which you should do for other viruses and bacteria but unless you have it and are sneezing in your hands, has almost zero to do with COVID transmission.

And lots of places that close for COVID and will be re-opening, are doing COVID theater here.  I will have to tell dd2 that she cannot go to a certain imaging place because they keep wiping counters and pens with lemon wipes- she is deadly allergic to inhaling citrus odors 

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On 8/26/2021 at 9:45 PM, Mrs Tiggywinkle said:

I worked a cardiac arrest today in 100 degree heat in a stuffy auto shop.   I cannot imagine wearing an N95 doing that; trying to intubate with the sweat dripping into my surgicaL mask was bad enough.

I think a lot of people underestimate how miserable the properly worn N95s can be.

Oh gosh, I sure know.  I put on my N95 in feels like 104 heat to go into medical building or pharmacy/store.  The very short walk is miserable.

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4 hours ago, TravelingChris said:

Oh not very many public health announcements here on ventilation at all.  Just the standard 3ft to 6 ft (should be really 9 ft or more) distance, masking, vaccine, and washing your hands-which you should do for other viruses and bacteria but unless you have it and are sneezing in your hands, has almost zero to do with COVID transmission.

And lots of places that close for COVID and will be re-opening, are doing COVID theater here.  I will have to tell dd2 that she cannot go to a certain imaging place because they keep wiping counters and pens with lemon wipes- she is deadly allergic to inhaling citrus odors 

It kinda makes sense that there aren't a lot of announcements about ventilation, because while I think that is probably the BIGGEST determination of whether a place is safe or not, it's not a factor that individuals can control at all or frankly even really evaluate.  I know I've been thinking about ventilation a lot since last fall, but I simply don't know enough about it to know how well a given building is ventilated, unless there is something like doors and windows open, which is super unusual.

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1 minute ago, Terabith said:

It kinda makes sense that there aren't a lot of announcements about ventilation, because while I think that is probably the BIGGEST determination of whether a place is safe or not, it's not a factor that individuals can control at all or frankly even really evaluate.  I know I've been thinking about ventilation a lot since last fall, but I simply don't know enough about it to know how well a given building is ventilated, unless there is something like doors and windows open, which is super unusual.

They can control in their houses though.  Recommending air flow- like opening windows if it isn't smoky or too humid outside.  Changing your air filters often and using ones that are the highest rated.  Using stand alone air filtration units.    I mean a small business can buy a small unit for their small store, No big retrofitting.  Or just open the door.

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Just now, TravelingChris said:

They can control in their houses though.  Recommending air flow- like opening windows if it isn't smoky or too humid outside.  Changing your air filters often and using ones that are the highest rated.  Using stand alone air filtration units.    I mean a small business can buy a small unit for their small store, No big retrofitting.  Or just open the door.

That's a good point!

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I hope this isn’t too graphic but this is a good description of the stages of Covid for a patient in hospital and ICU. The only real difference where I work is we do allow the next of kin into the room if the patient is dying, and we are on the ground floor, so other family members can be at the window.

 

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2021-08-26/pandemic-covid-19-stages-vaccination-intensive-care-respiratory-therapist?fbclid=IwAR3XEuNvTjhx3DyEde89-IKBTAsqiVbf-Zym8Zx91rnBexz03NvWVYMsTY8

 

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43 minutes ago, TCB said:

I hope this isn’t too graphic but this is a good description of the stages of Covid for a patient in hospital and ICU. The only real difference where I work is we do allow the next of kin into the room if the patient is dying, and we are on the ground floor, so other family members can be at the window.

 

https://www.latimes.com/opinion/story/2021-08-26/pandemic-covid-19-stages-vaccination-intensive-care-respiratory-therapist?fbclid=IwAR3XEuNvTjhx3DyEde89-IKBTAsqiVbf-Zym8Zx91rnBexz03NvWVYMsTY8

 

I heard about a study recently that always comes to mind when I read of the desperation of trying to get enough oxygen into lungs that are destroyed by covid. It was about oxygenating rats via oxygen-enriched liquid delivered via their rectum, and they actually were able to absorb enough oxygen that way to revive them. The potential implications for treatment of humans with lungs failing seems huge to me. I wish they could get trials in humans started soon enough to be able to see if there's an application in covid patients. I know people can be squeamish about such things, but if someone can't get enough oxygen, I would think any route that fixed that problem would be agreeable.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/14/science/rectum-breathing-oxygen.html

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First I've heard of this antibody therapy, Sotrovimab, which is under EUA at this time:

https://scitechdaily.com/inescapable-covid-19-antibody-discovery-neutralizes-all-known-sars-cov-2-strains/

Quote

“This antibody, which binds to a previously unknown site on the coronavirus spike protein, appears to neutralize all known sarbecoviruses – the genus of coronaviruses that cause respiratory infections in mammals,” said Nix, who is an affiliate in Berkeley Lab’s Biosciences Area. “And, due to the unique binding site on mutation-resistant part of the virus, it may well be more difficult for a new strain to escape.”

 

Would mRNA technology make it possible to give a vaccine that would make this Ab in the body on demand rather than only being able to use it after already infected?

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16 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

WELLINGTON, Aug 30 (Reuters) - New Zealand reported on Monday that a woman had died following

her Comirnaty Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination.

An independent COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring board considered that the woman’s death was due to myocarditis, which is known to be a rare side effect of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, the health ministry said in a statement.

The board noted there were other medical issues occurring at the same time which may have influenced the outcome following vaccination, the statement said.

Both the government and the press are handling it well. No one is using it as an antivaccine message, at least not in any of the major press or any of the 5 political parties. Right now vaccination is so high that we are going to run out of supply, and they are trying to source more ASAP to keep up with the surge in demand.  They vaccinated TEN percent of the entire population YESTERDAY. 

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10 hours ago, KSera said:

I heard about a study recently that always comes to mind when I read of the desperation of trying to get enough oxygen into lungs that are destroyed by covid. It was about oxygenating rats via oxygen-enriched liquid delivered via their rectum, and they actually were able to absorb enough oxygen that way to revive them. The potential implications for treatment of humans with lungs failing seems huge to me. I wish they could get trials in humans started soon enough to be able to see if there's an application in covid patients. I know people can be squeamish about such things, but if someone can't get enough oxygen, I would think any route that fixed that problem would be agreeable.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/14/science/rectum-breathing-oxygen.html

Well, aquatic turtles breathe through their butts....

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8 minutes ago, Dmmetler said:

Well, aquatic turtles breathe through their butts....

Exactly! The article mentions this. I’m honestly surprised I haven’t heard more interest in this.

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I have been reading and hearing about MANY breakthrough infections, but our TV stations keep reporting that almost everyone in the hospital is unvaccinated. Read the article below today. One third of the hospitalized in my state are vaccinated. I do not consider that a small amount, and I don't think they're doing anyone any favors by making it seem like being vaccinated = no risk. I think everyone should be wearing masks, at least indoors/with those outside your family, until we have a better sense of what's going on, especially the older, more at-risk folks. 

https://ctexaminer.com/2021/08/24/yale-doctors-warn-of-breakthrough-covid-infections-counsel-for-masks/

At Yale New Haven Health 27 percent of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were fully vaccinated. At Hartford Healthcare, that number is 30 percent. In the state as a whole, 65 percent of the entire population is vaccinated. 

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27 minutes ago, whitestavern said:

I have been reading and hearing about MANY breakthrough infections, but our TV stations keep reporting that almost everyone in the hospital is unvaccinated. Read the article below today. One third of the hospitalized in my state are vaccinated. I do not consider that a small amount, and I don't think they're doing anyone any favors by making it seem like being vaccinated = no risk. I think everyone should be wearing masks, at least indoors/with those outside your family, until we have a better sense of what's going on, especially the older, more at-risk folks. 

https://ctexaminer.com/2021/08/24/yale-doctors-warn-of-breakthrough-covid-infections-counsel-for-masks/

At Yale New Haven Health 27 percent of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 were fully vaccinated. At Hartford Healthcare, that number is 30 percent. In the state as a whole, 65 percent of the entire population is vaccinated. 

That is interesting it's so different there than most of the hospital dashboards I've seen for vaccinated/unvaccinated. That would be in part due to CT having higher vaccination rates than most states. It makes me wonder what percentage of the eligible population is vaccinated in each of those areas. Obviously, even based on the whole population, the unvaccinated people are very disporportionately represented in the hospital, but I'd expect that might become even more pronounced if the percentages are stated as a percentage of the eligible population (or even of the 18 and up) rather than of the entire population, since I expect pediatric hospitalizations go elsewhere and that those are such a tiny percentage of the overall anyway.

Totally agree that people shouldn't be acting like vaccinated=no mask needed. Everyone needs a mask indoors or in close quarters.

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2 minutes ago, KSera said:

That is interesting it's so different there than most of the hospital dashboards I've seen for vaccinated/unvaccinated. That would be in part due to CT having higher vaccination rates than most states. It makes me wonder what percentage of the eligible population is vaccinated in each of those areas. Obviously, even based on the whole population, the unvaccinated people are very disporportionately represented in the hospital, but I'd expect that might become even more pronounced if the percentages are stated as a percentage of the eligible population (or even of the 18 and up) rather than of the entire population, since I expect pediatric hospitalizations go elsewhere and that those are such a tiny percentage of the overall anyway.

Totally agree that people shouldn't be acting like vaccinated=no mask needed. Everyone needs a mask indoors or in close quarters.

This is the first time I've seen any information (in my state or not) about vaxxed vs unvaxxed. The message I keep hearing is almost all hospitalizations are unvaxxed. These two systems cover our entire state, or close to it, and include both children's hospitals. 

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22 minutes ago, whitestavern said:

This is the first time I've seen any information (in my state or not) about vaxxed vs unvaxxed. The message I keep hearing is almost all hospitalizations are unvaxxed. These two systems cover our entire state, or close to it, and include both children's hospitals. 

It looks to vary by state, and CT seems to have a higher proportion of vaccinated people hospitalized than anywhere else I've seen, which is why it made me wonder about their overall vacction numbers by eligible population. If you're curious, here's a link to a recent thread with quite a few hospital dashboards (if you scroll up and down the thread, you will see even more):

 

It's definitely interesting that the proportions are so much different in CT. Do you know anywhere that shows the percentage of eligible population vaccinated? Or is there anything unusual about the population there? Is it skewed a lot older?

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28 minutes ago, whitestavern said:

This is the first time I've seen any information (in my state or not) about vaxxed vs unvaxxed. The message I keep hearing is almost all hospitalizations are unvaxxed. These two systems cover our entire state, or close to it, and include both children's hospitals. 

You have to look at it as unvaxxed cases÷total # of unvaxxed, vs vaxxed cases ÷ total # of vaxxed. 

For illustrative purposes... Say out of 100 people, 10 are unvaxxed and 90 are vaxxed.  All the unvaxxed people are hospitalized but only 10% of the vaxxed. Then 10 unvaxxed and 9 vaxxed people are in the hospital, so almost half of the people in the hospital are vaxxed.  That does not mean that vaccination isn't hugely protective against hospitalization. 

If a really high percentage of the population is vaxxed (I think it's like 70% in CT, and higher for the ages more likely to be hospitalized) you're going to see a greater percentage of the hospitalized people be vaxxed compared to states where half or more of the population is still unvaxxed.

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38 minutes ago, whitestavern said:

This is the first time I've seen any information (in my state or not) about vaxxed vs unvaxxed. The message I keep hearing is almost all hospitalizations are unvaxxed. These two systems cover our entire state, or close to it, and include both children's hospitals. 

 

5 minutes ago, KSera said:

It looks to vary by state, and CT seems to have a higher proportion of vaccinated people hospitalized than anywhere else I've seen, which is why it made me wonder about their overall vacction numbers by eligible population. If you're curious, here's a link to a recent thread with quite a few hospital dashboards (if you scroll up and down the thread, you will see even more):

 

It's definitely interesting that the proportions are so much different in CT. Do you know anywhere that shows the percentage of eligible population vaccinated? Or is there anything unusual about the population there? Is it skewed a lot older?

https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Coronavirus/CTDPHCOVID19summary8262021.pdf

This is 4 days old, but according to this, 71.7% of the vaccinated deaths in CT were people 75 years and older.

I am not a math person but the conclusion by the people who made the linked CT document say:

"Compared to being vaccinated, being unvaccinated currently has the following relative risk:
5 Times higher risk of being infected with COVID-19
5 Times higher risk of dying from COVID-19
16 Times higher risk of being hospitalized with COVID-19"

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11 minutes ago, KSera said:

It looks to vary by state, and CT seems to have a higher proportion of vaccinated people hospitalized than anywhere else I've seen, which is why it made me wonder about their overall vacction numbers by eligible population. If you're curious, here's a link to a recent thread with quite a few hospital dashboards (if you scroll up and down the It's definitely interesting that the proportions are so much different in CT. Do you know anywhere that shows the percentage of eligible population vaccinated? Or is there anything unusual about the population there? Is it skewed a lot older?

In CT

55-64yo 83.3% fully vaxxed

65-74yo 89.5% fully vaxxed

75+yo     84.7% fully vaxxed

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8 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

You have to look at it as unvaxxed cases÷total # of unvaxxed, vs vaxxed cases ÷ total # of vaxxed. 

For illustrative purposes... Say out of 100 people, 10 are unvaxxed and 90 are vaxxed.  All the unvaxxed people are hospitalized but only 10% of the vaxxed. Then 10 unvaxxed and 9 vaxxed people are in the hospital, so almost half of the people in the hospital are vaxxed.  That does not mean that vaccination isn't hugely protective against hospitalization. 

If a really high percentage of the population is vaxxed (I think it's like 70% in CT, and higher for the ages more likely to be hospitalized) you're going to see a greater percentage of the hospitalized people be vaxxed compared to states where half or more of the population is still unvaxxed.

I understand that. I'm not saying anything about efficacy. I'm saying the message that everyone in the hospital is unvaxxed is not accurate. If they were honest, vaxxed people would be more likely to take precautions, which they are encouraging in the article. Delta has changed the game.

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4 hours ago, whitestavern said:

I understand that. I'm not saying anything about efficacy. I'm saying the message that everyone in the hospital is unvaxxed is not accurate. If they were honest, vaxxed people would be more likely to take precautions, which they are encouraging in the article. Delta has changed the game.

Well, I totally agree that vaxxed people need to be taking precautions against Delta and it has changed the game. The CDC at least has said everyone should be masking indoors again (I never stopped), but it was a huge mistake that they relaxed, because it seems since then a large bunch of people have turned their ears off.  I'm actually feeling a bit rage-y that my governor refuses to reinstate a mask mandate, as short of a mandate, seems like there's a big chunk of the population that has not gotten the memo.  

But along with the Delta/game changer theme, I'm also horrified that we're sending the under-12s back to school in full classrooms,  because even with a full masking, i think all-day full classrooms and lunch in cafeterias is going to be very much not enough against Delta, and they just don't seem to be able to acknowledge that things have changed.

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3 hours ago, whitestavern said:

I understand that. I'm not saying anything about efficacy. I'm saying the message that everyone in the hospital is unvaxxed is not accurate. If they were honest, vaxxed people would be more likely to take precautions, which they are encouraging in the article. Delta has changed the game.

Are they specifically saying that in your area that everyone in the hospital is unvaccinated? Because your area does seem to be a significant outlier in what the proportions are. In most places it is still the case that most of the people in the hospital, and especially those in the ICU and those on ventilators are unvaccinated.

I still agree that some vaxed people need to be getting the message about Delta better. I had someone drop something at my house the other day, and they started to come in the house when I opened the door (awkward!) They know that we are super cautious and don’t go anywhere right now, but I think they thought since we’re both vaccinated, it was fine. (They did come to the door masked, but it was a very loose cotton knit mask, so coming inside was a definite no go. We need better public instruction on how a mask needs to fit also.)

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https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-31/sa-major-incidents-declared-at-two-hospitals/100423172
 

Elective surgery cancelled in two major hospitals in my state - without there being a COVID outbreak.  
 

It's the worst we have seen': SASMOA

The SA Salaried Medical Officers Association's (SASMOA) senior industrial officer, Bernadette Mulholland, said the state's health system would not cope with a local COVID-19 outbreak. 

"Can you imagine now if we had COVID in this environment, it's just mind-blowing what we will be able to do, or won't be able to do if COVID crosses the border and comes into South Australia."

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19 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-08-31/sa-major-incidents-declared-at-two-hospitals/100423172
 

Elective surgery cancelled in two major hospitals in my state - without there being a COVID outbreak.  
 

It's the worst we have seen': SASMOA

The SA Salaried Medical Officers Association's (SASMOA) senior industrial officer, Bernadette Mulholland, said the state's health system would not cope with a local COVID-19 outbreak. 

"Can you imagine now if we had COVID in this environment, it's just mind-blowing what we will be able to do, or won't be able to do if COVID crosses the border and comes into South Australia."

Is that because they are sending some hcp to NSW or VIC? 

Or just winter overwhelm?

There are not enough ICU nurses in NSW. Weren't before Covid, won't be during Covid. Directly tied to budget cuts. Hospitals are staffed at minimum levels. 

I can't imagine SA is any better. I'm 100% behind closed borders for all states with low or zero Covid, until after 80% vax. We can't have every state's health systems crashing at once. 

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Just now, Melissa Louise said:

Is that because they are sending some hcp to NSW or VIC? 

Or just winter overwhelm?

There are not enough ICU nurses in NSW. Weren't before Covid, won't be during Covid. Directly tied to budget cuts. Hospitals are staffed at minimum levels. 

I can't imagine SA is any better. I'm 100% behind closed borders for all states with low or zero Covid, until after 80% vax. We can't have every state's health systems crashing at once. 

Its possible but I doubt it.  We had a similar incident about two months ago and I know first hand that it’s true because one of my kids needed emergency (thankfully nothing life threatening) and DH went to three hospitals to try and find one where there was any hope of being seen that day. (GP wasn’t able to handle it).  It was almost midnight before he got dealt with (happened just after lunch). There’s been an ongoing industrial dispute with paramedics for a couple of years now about demand and ramping etc.  There was also a couple of kind of satellite cities/regions left without an available ambulance for several hours yesterday from what I understand from DH.  They need both more ambulances and faster admission to hospital so the paramedics can keep working instead of ramping all the time.

The COVID backup plan is to have firefighters drive ambulances so they can be operated by a single paramedic.  And CFS/SES volunteers. So better all hope no one actually needs the fire brigade as well and we have a nice mild bushfire season.

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1 minute ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Its possible but I doubt it.  We had a similar incident about two months ago and I know first hand that it’s true because one of my kids needed emergency (thankfully nothing life threatening) and DH went to three hospitals to try and find one where there was any hope of being seen that day. (GP wasn’t able to handle it).  It was almost midnight before he got dealt with (happened just after lunch). There’s been an ongoing industrial dispute with paramedics for a couple of years now about demand and ramping etc.  There was also a couple of kind of satellite cities/regions left without an available ambulance for several hours yesterday from what I understand from DH.  They need both more ambulances and faster admission to hospital so the paramedics can keep working instead of ramping all the time.

The COVID backup plan is to have firefighters drive ambulances so they can be operated by a single paramedic.  And CFS/SES volunteers. So better all hope no one actually needs the fire brigade as well and we have a nice mild bushfire season.

Oh man, that's bad. Keep those borders slammed shut. 

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