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https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.11.18.388819v1.full#ref-12
 

Long covid related pre print.  Basically although they couldn’t detect COVID in the PCR a different kind of test showed it persisting in the olfactory mucosa.  It’s a little over my head but I guess shows there’s actually a mechanism behind it.  
 

 

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DS got home 3 hours ago!  ❤️❤️

Update-  my youngest is not only short of breath, coughing, dizzy, nausaues, and with headache-  she is also confused.  I called our doctor and talked with him and she is going to be going to the ER.

Thought I'd post a pic of my dd, getting ready to spend another day in a coronavirus triage tent!  

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No new cases today but the case linked to the English language school who was supposed to quarantine didn’t.  Last Sunday they went shopping and visited eight different locations . Who does that?  Even without quarantine I’d be exhausted doing that many stops!  Four of those locations anyone whose been there needs to go into quarantine and be tested including a Kmart and big w store and a food land so that will be a stack of people affected.  They are tracking people down using credit card details and loyalty programmes to notify them.

 

The English language students are going to be moved to medi hotel now instead of home quarantine.  Also anyone else on that section of the uni campus needs to quarantine.  

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Not sure about source reliability but a pregnant woman in Singapore has given birth to a baby with antibodies to COVID19 after contracting it during pregnancy.

https://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/infected-after-holiday-to-europe-pregnant-mum-gives-birth-to-baby-with-covid-19-antibodies

Is that how immunity normally gets passed on?  I know it can be shared through breastmilk and that with certain sheep sicknesses vaccinating in the weeks before birth gives the lambs some immunity so I’m guessing it’s the same for people?

 

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Another Vitamin D article.

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/12/3642

Vitamin D Insufficiency May Account for Almost Nine of Ten COVID-19 Deaths: Time to Act. Comment on: “Vitamin D Deficiency and Outcome of COVID-19 Patients”. 

Evidence from observational studies is accumulating, suggesting that the majority of deaths due to SARS-CoV-2 infections are statistically attributable to vitamin D insufficiency and could potentially be prevented by vitamin D supplementation. Given the dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic, rational vitamin D supplementation whose safety has been proven in an extensive body of research should be promoted and initiated to limit the toll of the pandemic even before the final proof of efficacy in preventing COVID-19 deaths by randomized trials.

 

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8 hours ago, BeachGal said:

Another Vitamin D article.

https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/12/3642

Vitamin D Insufficiency May Account for Almost Nine of Ten COVID-19 Deaths: Time to Act. Comment on: “Vitamin D Deficiency and Outcome of COVID-19 Patients”. 

Evidence from observational studies is accumulating, suggesting that the majority of deaths due to SARS-CoV-2 infections are statistically attributable to vitamin D insufficiency and could potentially be prevented by vitamin D supplementation. Given the dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic, rational vitamin D supplementation whose safety has been proven in an extensive body of research should be promoted and initiated to limit the toll of the pandemic even before the final proof of efficacy in preventing COVID-19 deaths by randomized trials.

 

Does it state within the article what good levels of Vit D are or do you know? I had mine checked and was told that at 65 (whatever the unit of measure was) it's very good, but I can't find any sources that tell me the range of acceptable Vit. D in the body. All I find is how much is useful to take daily.

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2 hours ago, Wilrunner3 said:

Does it state within the article what good levels of Vit D are or do you know? I had mine checked and was told that at 65 (whatever the unit of measure was) it's very good, but I can't find any sources that tell me the range of acceptable Vit. D in the body. All I find is how much is useful to take daily.

Great question. My guess is what's considered normal range in the US might be lower than in Germany. 

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3 hours ago, Wilrunner3 said:

Does it state within the article what good levels of Vit D are or do you know? I had mine checked and was told that at 65 (whatever the unit of measure was) it's very good, but I can't find any sources that tell me the range of acceptable Vit. D in the body. All I find is how much is useful to take daily.

Grassroots Health, a nonprofit that studies Vitamin D, recommends above 40-60 ng/ml.

https://www.grassrootshealth.net/vitamin-d-supplements-reduce-risk-influenza-covid-19-infection-death/

More articles here:

https://www.grassrootshealth.net/blog-category/coronavirus/

Anyone interested can order a diy blood spot test from them to test your level of vitamin D at home. Our family uses their test. You buy it online, they send you the kit, you poke your finger and place drops of blood on a spot card, then mail it back. They also ask that you fill out a longish questionnaire online about health, sun exposure and supplements. It takes awhile to get results, 2-3 weeks, but is a way to avoid going in to a lab.

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3 hours ago, Wilrunner3 said:

Does it state within the article what good levels of Vit D are or do you know? I had mine checked and was told that at 65 (whatever the unit of measure was) it's very good, but I can't find any sources that tell me the range of acceptable Vit. D in the body. All I find is how much is useful to take daily.

I do best between 80 and 100. 100 is the upper level, I believe. 

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Of 7,389 samples of blood donated to the Red Cross from mid-December to mid-January, 106 were reactive by pan Ig for SARS-CoV-2-antibodies. All 9 states in the study had positive samples. 

So Covid was in the US in December, which I think many of us already knew. 

https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciaa1785/6012472

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2 hours ago, Acadie said:

Of 7,389 samples of blood donated to the Red Cross from mid-December to mid-January, 106 were reactive by pan Ig for SARS-CoV-2-antibodies. All 9 states in the study had positive samples. 

So Covid was in the US in December, which I think many of us already knew. 

https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cid/ciaa1785/6012472

Waiting for someone to say November,  because that's when I think we had it.

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At least one hospital in northern Ohio has borrowed a refrigerated truck, because they don't have space for all the patients who have died from Covid. 

I wish public health officials would adopt this Akron nurse's framing of where we are in the pandemic--

“We’re no longer the front lines,” she said. “We’re the last line of defense. The front line now is the community.”

https://www.cleveland.com/open/2020/11/ohio-hospitals-showing-signs-of-coronavirus-overwhelm-borrowing-refrigerated-trucks-and-ventilators.html

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On 11/22/2020 at 9:27 PM, Pen said:


I-MASK+ protocol update based on MATH+ is available...

Besides the Idea of indicating use of mask, the I afaik is for Ivermectin.

 


bumping my own post as I think it’s important 

as is Vitamin D extremely important imo (I think Marik tends to be low on D suggestions, but that may relate to latitude he’s used to)

excellent DrBeen interview with Dr Marik recently about I MASK. And another follow up explanation of Ivermectin and how it can help at several stages 

Dr Been has had several episodes devoted to Ivermectin in course of Pandemic 

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21 hours ago, Acadie said:

Great question. My guess is what's considered normal range in the US might be lower than in Germany. 

What is the range in Germany?

21 hours ago, BeachGal said:

Grassroots Health, a nonprofit that studies Vitamin D, recommends above 40-60 ng/ml.

https://www.grassrootshealth.net/vitamin-d-supplements-reduce-risk-influenza-covid-19-infection-death/

More articles here:

https://www.grassrootshealth.net/blog-category/coronavirus/

Anyone interested can order a diy blood spot test from them to test your level of vitamin D at home. Our family uses their test. You buy it online, they send you the kit, you poke your finger and place drops of blood on a spot card, then mail it back. They also ask that you fill out a longish questionnaire online about health, sun exposure and supplements. It takes awhile to get results, 2-3 weeks, but is a way to avoid going in to a lab.

Thank you. At 65, then, I have good levels. I'll need to confirm the measurement levels are the same.

20 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I do best between 80 and 100. 100 is the upper level, I believe. 

Thank you. Good to know the upper limits. I wonder if continuing to take Vit. D will continue to raise my numbers. I'm going to guess it will keep them about the same since I don't go outside as much in the winter.

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https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-12-03/mega-dose-of-vitamin-c-treats-sepsis-florey-institute-austin/12939202
 

A critically ill man in australia who had Covid and sepsis recovered after a megadose of vitamin C.  Obviously only a single anecdote but they are following it up with a trial.

“Professor Bellomo said after the patient had the megadose of vitamin C, the changes were "'remarkable".

"In a short period of time, we saw improved regulation of blood pressure, arterial blood oxygen levels and kidney function," he said.

His temperature also improved.

"The patient was able to be taken off machine ventilation 12 days after starting sodium ascorbate treatment and discharged from hospital without any complications 22 days later," he said.

 

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9 hours ago, Wilrunner3 said:

What is the range in Germany?

Thank you. At 65, then, I have good levels. I'll need to confirm the measurement levels are the same.

Thank you. Good to know the upper limits. I wonder if continuing to take Vit. D will continue to raise my numbers. I'm going to guess it will keep them about the same since I don't go outside as much in the winter.

Europe normally uses different scale/units

you need to know whether you got a test with results in ng/mL or nmols/L (or something else).

If you use an ng/mL number range with a nmol/L result you will probably be low when you think you are normal

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Abc Aus 

WORLD NEWS: Germany extends coronavirus lockdown

Germany is to extend its partial coronavirus lockdown to January 10, following a meeting between Chancellor Angela Merkel and the head of the country's different states. 

The restrictions had been set to expire just before Christmas. 

Germany has been seeing its worst daily figures for coronavirus related deaths, registering 487 in the last day. 

Edited by Ausmumof3
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So, odd situation with the worker in NSW Australia who contracted Covid; looks like she cleaned the room of some US airline crew who stayed there for a short time between flights. The crew weren't tested for Covid, just had to isolate, but now they're re-thinking that policy. 

So with that resolved it seems there is no Covid circulating anywhere in the community in Australia . . . at the moment. One of the outcomes of this is that we will probably not get the vaccine until quite a bit after other countries, because there will not be any emergency reason for it.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/no-new-covid-19-cases-as-fresh-infection-linked-to-overseas-strain-20201204-p56kmn.html

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5 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

This kind of thing is so horrible and crazy it is difficult to believe, and yet I have heard so many stories like these.

What kind of people are we in this country if this is how we behave? I honestly am so disillusioned with people, more so than I have ever been before in my 56 years. I really just want to stay home and pretend there aren’t so many crazy, mean people around, who have totally lost the ability to use simple logic.

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1 hour ago, TCB said:

This kind of thing is so horrible and crazy it is difficult to believe, and yet I have heard so many stories like these.

What kind of people are we in this country if this is how we behave? I honestly am so disillusioned with people, more so than I have ever been before in my 56 years. I really just want to stay home and pretend there aren’t so many crazy, mean people around, who have totally lost the ability to use simple logic.

This is not unique to our country, I think. I've thought a lot about this--the seeming inability to use logic. But logic doesn't do much good without trust.

I closely followed the ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The HCWs, scientists, and others who were desperately trying to eradicate that virus were met with resistance and aggression at every turn. Human beings are human beings where ever they happen to be located geographically. I'm not at all surprised by the "resistance" in our own country. Here is one study on DRC's issues w/ resistance. Clearly, there are vastly different cultural beliefs systems in play, but their conclusions do show some parallels with what might be going on in our society here. I wish that the CDC and NIH could do something similar with focus groups here. Maybe they are, but I haven't heard about it.

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17 minutes ago, popmom said:

This is not unique to our country, I think. I've thought a lot about this--the seeming inability to use logic. But logic doesn't do much good without trust.

I closely followed the ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The HCWs, scientists, and others who were desperately trying to eradicate that virus were met with resistance and aggression at every turn. Human beings are human beings where ever they happen to be located geographically. I'm not at all surprised by the "resistance" in our own country. Here is one study on DRC's issues w/ resistance. Clearly, there are vastly different cultural beliefs systems in play, but their conclusions do show some parallels with what might be going on in our society here. I wish that the CDC and NIH could do something similar with focus groups here. Maybe they are, but I haven't heard about it.

I think there is more than just cultural differences between the US and the DRC, but also educational differences and the overall level of development in the countries. I think the more interesting question is what makes us so different from our peer countries.

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1 minute ago, Frances said:

I think there is more than just cultural differences between the US and the DRC, but also educational differences and the overall level of development in the countries. I think the more interesting question is what makes us so different from our peer countries.

I think it may be difficult to define a "peer country" to the U.S. 

I found it encouraging the process they used to try to reach those who were resistant.

 

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3 minutes ago, Frances said:

Maybe so, but I highly doubt the DRC would make the top fifty or even one hundred options.

So we should dismiss their experience out of hand because of that? I think the big parallel is trust. And respect for a human being's personal beliefs. That was my take away from the study, and all the other things I read over that period of time.

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1 minute ago, popmom said:

So we should dismiss their experience out of hand because of that? I think the big parallel is trust. And respect for a human being's personal beliefs. That was my take away from the study, and all the other things I read over that period of time.

No, I don’t think it should be dismissed. I just think more can be gained from comparing the US to peer countries. Plus, I don’t think it’s hard to understand why we are seeing what we are in this country. It’s not some big mystery. Science and scientists have been under attack, primarily by one side, in this country for a long time. The pandemic was politicized and propaganda, disinformation, and misinformation were purposely used to instill anger and fear of loss of freedoms to maintain division and political power.

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10 minutes ago, Frances said:

I think there is more than just cultural differences between the US and the DRC, but also educational differences and the overall level of development in the countries. I think the more interesting question is what makes us so different from our peer countries.

Do we dismiss or judge those who don't have what we have arbitrarily determined to be an acceptable level of education as less than? Are they less human? Are their feelings less valid? This is where by beef with elitists comes in. 

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Just now, Frances said:

No, I don’t think it should be dismissed. I just think more can be gained from comparing the US to peer countries. Plus, I don’t think it’s hard to understand why we are seeing what we are in this country. It’s not some big mystery. Science and scientists have been under attack, primarily by one side, in this country for a long time. The pandemic was politicized and propaganda, disinformation, and misinformation were purposely used to instill anger and fear of loss of freedoms to maintain division and political power.

Sorry. I'm not buying that. That's a convenient way to dismiss and devalue entire people groups. I can't do that. 

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Just now, popmom said:

Do we dismiss or judge those who don't have what we have arbitrarily determined to be an acceptable level of education as less than? Are they less human? Are their feelings less valid? This is where by beef with elitists comes in. 

Of course not and please don’t try to twist my words. However, there are actual measures of education and development that are used to compare countries.

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1 minute ago, Frances said:

Of course not and please don’t try to twist my words. However, there are actual measures of education and development that are used to compare countries.

I wasn't twisting your words. I'm sorry if it came across that way. I was trying to probe a little deeper. That's all. Man do I know about people on this board twisting words. I surely don't want to be party to that.

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1 minute ago, popmom said:

Sorry. I'm not buying that. That's a convenient way to dismiss and devalue entire people groups. I can't do that. 

There’s no need to agree, but certainly the US is somewhat unique among peer countries in it’s widespread dismissal of science and scientists and it’s strong focus on individual freedoms rather than what is best for society. And politicians were exploiting this long before the pandemic. So I don’t find it all surprising that it was magnified during a global health crisis and left us in a weakened position relative to our peers.

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1 minute ago, Frances said:

There’s no need to agree, but certainly the US is somewhat unique among peer countries in it’s widespread dismissal of science and scientists and it’s strong focus on individual freedoms rather than what is best for society. And politicians were exploiting this long before the pandemic. So I don’t find it all surprising that it was magnified during a global health crisis and left us in a weakened position relative to our peers.

First, we have no peer. 

Second, our country exists because of a select group of people who valued individual freedom over personal safety. This is primarily why our country has no true peer. IMO

And yes we can disagree. 

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Just now, popmom said:

First, we have no peer. 

Second, our country exists because of a select group of people who valued individual freedom over personal safety. This is primarily why our country has no true peer. IMO

And yes we can disagree. 

Yes, we can agree to disagree on whether or not we have true peers or even any peers.

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42 minutes ago, popmom said:

What many see as exploiting is what many also see as representing.

I can see that side of it. Personally, I prefer my representation to be of the uniting, factual, non-propaganda and disinformation based variety, but to each his or her own own.

Edited by Frances
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