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17 hours ago, Acadie said:

Antibody testing in the UK is quite accurate, so I'm going to trust the results of this study linking three types of rashes to Covid as key diagnostic signs.

Summary on King's College website: https://www.kcl.ac.uk/news/skin-rash-should-be-considered-fourth-key-symptom-of-covid

(Cross-posted on Covid toes thread)

I report to this study app each day. The research seems well organised.

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DS got home 3 hours ago!  ❤️❤️

Update-  my youngest is not only short of breath, coughing, dizzy, nausaues, and with headache-  she is also confused.  I called our doctor and talked with him and she is going to be going to the ER.

That's not a blanket right.  If my religion required human sacrifice, I can't practice it.  If my religion required sexual assault, I can't practice it. Freedom of religion isn't a blanket right

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31 minutes ago, Kanin said:

Is there a website that shows the transmission rates in other countries as compared to US states? I would like to see that.

 

I think I have found It on this website in the past. But right now I can’t. If you find the exact right place could you please post back that link.

 

https://ourworldindata.org/coronavirus-data

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36 minutes ago, Kanin said:

Is there a website that shows the transmission rates in other countries as compared to US states? I would like to see that.

rt.live shows the numbers by state - I tried googling rt world and worldwide, and I got a bunch of hits for Russia Today!  😱

If anyone has better googling skills than I, please share!

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2 hours ago, square_25 said:

My answer is air conditioning :-P. 

No, really, right now even Sweden with its lax policies looks very under control, while the places with AC do not. Israel has lots of AC. So do the Southern US states. And I can tell you that Europe have very minimal air conditioning on average... 

I've been thinking about this.  It's been super hot here lately.  Lots and lots of air conditioning, nobody wanting to be outside.  It's going to be even worse in the next week or so (110 heat index Monday).   

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19 hours ago, square_25 said:

I'll cross-reply, I guess... I don't see them actually testing people with COVID toes here?? 

 

You're absolutely right, Square--my bad, I didn't read the actual study. I don't want to my mistake to detract from the value of these findings, though.

They're gathering lots of data both from people who have tested positive for Covid and people who are untested but do have symptoms, and concluded that 3 types of rashes should be considered symptoms of Covid. Getting the word out will help people when testing can be hard to access and still inaccurate in some places.

Interesting to hear that @Laura Corin reports data to this project! With such a wide range of Covid symptoms what we can learn from broad surveys like this is valuable.

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3 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

rt.live shows the numbers by state - I tried googling rt world and worldwide, and I got a bunch of hits for Russia Today!  😱

If anyone has better googling skills than I, please share!

Thanks!

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22 hours ago, square_25 said:

I'll cross-reply, I guess... I don't see them actually testing people with COVID toes here?? 

In the article or here irl?

My DS did get tested even without any other symptoms. I think we really lucked out with a knowledgable doctor; I can imagine in too many practices it would have been a fight.

I made a point of mentioning his Covid toes to every nurse and doctor when we were just in the ER for something (probably) unrelated, and will continue to bring it up at every one of DS's upcoming doctor visits because I want it documented everywhere. Should this country ever actually study it, or should weird health issues come up in the future, I want clear documentation and records in case there are dots to be connected.

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3 minutes ago, MEmama said:

In the article or here irl?

My DS did get tested even without any other symptoms. I think we really lucked out with a knowledgable doctor; I can imagine in too many practices it would have been a fight.

I made a point of mentioning his Covid toes to every nurse and doctor when we were just in the ER for something (probably) unrelated, and will continue to bring it up at every one of DS's upcoming doctor visits because I want it documented everywhere. Should this country ever actually study it, or should weird health issues come up in the future, I want clear documentation and records in case there are dots to be connected.

I meant in the article :-). Just asking because I've now seen a few articles where they do test people presenting that way and mostly don't find COVID. It's weird, though. 

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CNN - pooled sampling in the US The US Food and Drug Administration on Saturday announced it has issued an emergency use authorization that allows Quest Diagnostics to pool samples from up to four individuals to test for Covid-19. 

This is the first Covid-19 diagnostic test in the United States to be authorized for use with pooled samples, the agency said in a statement. 

"This EUA for sample pooling is an important step forward in getting more Covid-19 tests to more Americans more quickly while preserving testing supplies," FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn said in the statement. "Sample pooling becomes especially important as infection rates decline and we begin testing larger portions of the population."

Sample pooling allows multiple people to be tested at once. The samples are collected and then tested in a pool or "batch" using just one test. If the pool tests positive, this means one of or more of the people tested in that pool may be infected with the virus. Each of the samples would then have to be tested again individually.

The FDA last month published guidance for developers that want to make and use tests for pooled samples.

In late June, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the White House coronavirus task force was "seriously considering" pool testing as a new strategy to improve testing as the nation experienced a surge in Covid-19 cases.

In its statement, the FDA said that while there is a "concern that combining samples may make it more difficult to detect positives, since pooling in the laboratory dilutes any viral material present in the samples," Quest’s validation data correctly identified all of the pooled samples that contained a positive sample. 

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Pooling, if done correctly & with a low enough % positive rate, saves tests. At the 10% or higher rate, I think the math doesn't work out as well.

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Mandatory masks for the whole locked down area in Vic., so all of Melbourne plus the shire directly north of Melbourne. There will be a $200 on the spot fine after Wednesday for anyone older the age of 12 not wearing a mask. 

Also 80% of new cases over the last few days people have caught the virus at work. 

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14 hours ago, Acadie said:

 

You're absolutely right, Square--my bad, I didn't read the actual study. I don't want to my mistake to detract from the value of these findings, though.

They're gathering lots of data both from people who have tested positive for Covid and people who are untested but do have symptoms, and concluded that 3 types of rashes should be considered symptoms of Covid. Getting the word out will help people when testing can be hard to access and still inaccurate in some places.

Interesting to hear that @Laura Corin reports data to this project! With such a wide range of Covid symptoms what we can learn from broad surveys like this is valuable.

Yes, there are 4 million subscribers. The study also spotted anosmia as an early symptom before it was well known. They ask you to report any and all symptoms daily, as well as test results if any, supplements taken, contact with others over the previous week, mask wearing, etc.

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4 hours ago, Melissa in Australia said:

Mandatory masks for the whole locked down area in Vic., so all of Melbourne plus the shire directly north of Melbourne. There will be a $200 on the spot fine after Wednesday for anyone older the age of 12 not wearing a mask. 

Also 80% of new cases over the last few days people have caught the virus at work. 

How easy are masks to come by?  I’m considering ordering here just to be prepared.  I could probably sew some but would rather order some in I think.  My sewing is “ok” but not professional.  I’ve held off due to cost.

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I haven't actually looked for a mask. so I don't know on availability. 

 we have 1 mask that was given to us by the army when we evacuated from fires in the summer . I made bandannas for the twins, and will make some cloth masks this week. the government has provided links to patterns of masks. I haven't looked yet.

 

 

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53 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

How easy are masks to come by?  I’m considering ordering here just to be prepared.  I could probably sew some but would rather order some in I think.  My sewing is “ok” but not professional.  I’ve held off due to cost.


Up in our area of Central Vic, there seems to be a woman in every town making them. I bought some locally to send home with dd for her household last weekend. 

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I have been looking for results on the U Of MN hydroxychloroquine study. It had 2 arms - 1 was looking at taking hcq after a covid exposure. This showed little benefit, although there were some limitations because they weren't able to test most patients.

The 2nd arm was looking at taking hcq early on in the covid progression. These results were just published here.  They concluded that hcq had little benefit for these patients too. However, I am confused. 10 patients in the placebo group were hospitalized and 4 patients in the hcq group were hospitalized. That seems significant to me. What am I missing?

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3 minutes ago, TracyP said:

I have been looking for results on the U Of MN hydroxychloroquine study. It had 2 arms - 1 was looking at taking hcq after a covid exposure. This showed little benefit, although there were some limitations because they weren't able to test most patients.

The 2nd arm was looking at taking hcq early on in the covid progression. These results were just published here.  They concluded that hcq had little benefit for these patients too. However, I am confused. 10 patients in the placebo group were hospitalized and 4 patients in the hcq group were hospitalized. That seems significant to me. What am I missing?

There were almost 500 participants. And 2 of the 10 hopitalized in the placebo arm were hospitalized for something not related to Covid. So it was 8 vs 4, and when you are looking at 500 people that isn't enough to be statistically significant vs just random fluctuation. 

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39 minutes ago, TracyP said:

I have been looking for results on the U Of MN hydroxychloroquine study. It had 2 arms - 1 was looking at taking hcq after a covid exposure. This showed little benefit, although there were some limitations because they weren't able to test most patients.

The 2nd arm was looking at taking hcq early on in the covid progression. These results were just published here.  They concluded that hcq had little benefit for these patients too. However, I am confused. 10 patients in the placebo group were hospitalized and 4 patients in the hcq group were hospitalized. That seems significant to me. What am I missing?

Yeah, that’s the problem with following people who aren’t sick yet — you might have few enough people get sick that you have no statistical power.

If I remember correctly, the 500 isn’t relevant here, only the small numbers hospitalized. 

By the way, “statistically significant” generally means “has a chance of less than 5 percent of happening randomly.” If you randomly distributed 12 hospitalized patients between two groups, the chance of having 4 or fewer in one group is around 20 percent, which is far too high.

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3 hours ago, Rosie_0801 said:


Up in our area of Central Vic, there seems to be a woman in every town making them. I bought some locally to send home with dd for her household last weekend. 

Awesome.  Glad to hear that.

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To find out whether particular symptoms tend to appear together and how this related to the progression of the disease, the research team used a machine learning algorithm to analyse data from a subset of around 1,600 users in the UK and US with confirmed COVID-19 who had regularly logged their symptoms using the app in March and April.

The analysis revealed six specific groupings of symptoms emerging at characteristic timepoints in the progression of the illness, representing six distinct ‘types’ of COVID-19. The algorithm was then tested by running it on a second independent dataset of 1,000 users in the UK, US and Sweden, who had logged their symptoms during May.

All people reporting symptoms experienced headache and loss of smell, with varying combinations of additional symptoms at various times. Some of these, such as confusion, abdominal pain and shortness of breath, are not widely known as COVID-19 symptoms, yet are hallmarks of the most severe forms of the disease.

The six clusters are as follows:

 

1- (‘flu-like’ with no fever): Headache, loss of smell, muscle pains, cough, sore throat, chest pain, no fever.

2- (‘flu-like’ with fever): Headache, loss of smell, cough, sore throat, hoarseness, fever, loss of appetite.

3- (gastrointestinal): Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, diarrhea, sore throat, chest pain, no cough.

4- (severe level one, fatigue): Headache, loss of smell, cough, fever, hoarseness, chest pain, fatigue.

5- (severe level two, confusion): Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain.

6- (severe level three, abdominal and respiratory): Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain, shortness of breath, diarrhea, abdominal pain.

Next, the team investigated whether people experiencing particular symptom clusters were more likely to require breathing support in the form of ventilation or additional oxygen.

They discovered that only 1.5% of people with cluster 1, 4.4% of people with cluster 2 and 3.3% of people with cluster 3 COVID-19 required breathing support. These figures were 8.6%, 9.9% and 19.8% for clusters 4,5 and 6 respectively. Furthermore, nearly half of the patients in cluster 6 ended up in hospital, compared with just 16% of those in cluster 1.

Broadly, people with cluster 4,5 or 6 COVID-19 symptoms tended to be older and frailer, and were more likely to be overweight and have pre-existing conditions such as diabetes or lung disease than those with type 1,2 or 3.

The researchers then developed a model combining information about age, sex, BMI and pre-existing conditions together with symptoms gathered over just five days from the onset of the illness.

This was able to predict which cluster a patient falls into and their risk of requiring hospitalisation and breathing support with a higher likelihood of being correct than an existing risk model based purely on age, sex, BMI and pre-existing conditions alone.

Given that most people who require breathing support come to hospital around 13 days after their first symptoms, this extra eight days represents a significant ‘early warning’ as to who is most likely to need more intensive care.

“These findings have important implications for care and monitoring of people who are most vulnerable to severe COVID-19,” said Dr Claire Steves from King’s College London. “If you can predict who these people are at day five, you have time to give them support and early interventions such as monitoring blood oxygen and sugar levels, and ensuring they are properly hydrated - simple care that could be given at home, preventing hospitalisations and saving lives.”
https://www.technologynetworks.com/diagnostics/news/researchers-identify-six-distinct-types-of-covid-19-337592
 

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.12.20129056v1

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1 hour ago, Plum said:

To find out whether particular symptoms tend to appear together and how this related to the progression of the disease, the research team used a machine learning algorithm to analyse data from a subset of around 1,600 users in the UK and US with confirmed COVID-19 who had regularly logged their symptoms using the app in March and April.

The analysis revealed six specific groupings of symptoms emerging at characteristic timepoints in the progression of the illness, representing six distinct ‘types’ of COVID-19. The algorithm was then tested by running it on a second independent dataset of 1,000 users in the UK, US and Sweden, who had logged their symptoms during May.

All people reporting symptoms experienced headache and loss of smell, with varying combinations of additional symptoms at various times. Some of these, such as confusion, abdominal pain and shortness of breath, are not widely known as COVID-19 symptoms, yet are hallmarks of the most severe forms of the disease.

The six clusters are as follows:

 

1- (‘flu-like’ with no fever): Headache, loss of smell, muscle pains, cough, sore throat, chest pain, no fever.

2- (‘flu-like’ with fever): Headache, loss of smell, cough, sore throat, hoarseness, fever, loss of appetite.

3- (gastrointestinal): Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, diarrhea, sore throat, chest pain, no cough.

4- (severe level one, fatigue): Headache, loss of smell, cough, fever, hoarseness, chest pain, fatigue.

5- (severe level two, confusion): Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain.

6- (severe level three, abdominal and respiratory): Headache, loss of smell, loss of appetite, cough, fever, hoarseness, sore throat, chest pain, fatigue, confusion, muscle pain, shortness of breath, diarrhea, abdominal pain.

Next, the team investigated whether people experiencing particular symptom clusters were more likely to require breathing support in the form of ventilation or additional oxygen.

They discovered that only 1.5% of people with cluster 1, 4.4% of people with cluster 2 and 3.3% of people with cluster 3 COVID-19 required breathing support. These figures were 8.6%, 9.9% and 19.8% for clusters 4,5 and 6 respectively. Furthermore, nearly half of the patients in cluster 6 ended up in hospital, compared with just 16% of those in cluster 1.

Broadly, people with cluster 4,5 or 6 COVID-19 symptoms tended to be older and frailer, and were more likely to be overweight and have pre-existing conditions such as diabetes or lung disease than those with type 1,2 or 3.

The researchers then developed a model combining information about age, sex, BMI and pre-existing conditions together with symptoms gathered over just five days from the onset of the illness.

This was able to predict which cluster a patient falls into and their risk of requiring hospitalisation and breathing support with a higher likelihood of being correct than an existing risk model based purely on age, sex, BMI and pre-existing conditions alone.

Given that most people who require breathing support come to hospital around 13 days after their first symptoms, this extra eight days represents a significant ‘early warning’ as to who is most likely to need more intensive care.

“These findings have important implications for care and monitoring of people who are most vulnerable to severe COVID-19,” said Dr Claire Steves from King’s College London. “If you can predict who these people are at day five, you have time to give them support and early interventions such as monitoring blood oxygen and sugar levels, and ensuring they are properly hydrated - simple care that could be given at home, preventing hospitalisations and saving lives.”
https://www.technologynetworks.com/diagnostics/news/researchers-identify-six-distinct-types-of-covid-19-337592
 

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.06.12.20129056v1

That sounds like a really good tool!

I hope your dh is feeling better. I was wondering if you knew how hospitals are faring in your state? I heard someone at work saying the report of bed availability in Houston wasn’t as bad as portrayed- although the person she heard it from was not a HCW but lived in the city and knew 3 nurses, not sure what kind of nurses they were. I wish there was an easier way of getting just the facts but it seems very difficult to do that right now.

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22 hours ago, TCB said:

That sounds like a really good tool!

I hope your dh is feeling better. I was wondering if you knew how hospitals are faring in your state? I heard someone at work saying the report of bed availability in Houston wasn’t as bad as portrayed- although the person she heard it from was not a HCW but lived in the city and knew 3 nurses, not sure what kind of nurses they were. I wish there was an easier way of getting just the facts but it seems very difficult to do that right now.

Thanks! He’s currently “cluster 2” but his fever hasn’t really come back yet. We’re only on day 2 of symptoms. 

Capacity depends on location. The denser area hospitals are at 90%+ capacity. His hospital was behind the others but has recently had record high hospitalizations  

Some of his sister hospitals sent vents to another sister hospital in TX. I don’t know which one or where. (not that I could say anyway) 

Edited by Plum
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4 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

There were almost 500 participants. And 2 of the 10 hopitalized in the placebo arm were hospitalized for something not related to Covid. So it was 8 vs 4, and when you are looking at 500 people that isn't enough to be statistically significant vs just random fluctuation. 

I wondered about including those 2. Whether 10 or 8 vs. 4 it seemed significant to me, but I guess I don't know how that works when it comes to these studies. 

3 hours ago, square_25 said:

Yeah, that’s the problem with following people who aren’t sick yet — you might have few enough people get sick that you have no statistical power.

If I remember correctly, the 500 isn’t relevant here, only the small numbers hospitalized. 

By the way, “statistically significant” generally means “has a chance of less than 5 percent of happening randomly.” If you randomly distributed 12 hospitalized patients between two groups, the chance of having 4 or fewer in one group is around 20 percent, which is far too high.

That makes sense, though I guess this study is still going to leave me with unanswered questions about hcq which is annoying. 😋 Do either of you (or anyone) have thoughts on remdisivir? That drug seems to be quite popular even though the study results seemed fairly insignificant to me. 

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38 minutes ago, TracyP said:

That makes sense, though I guess this study is still going to leave me with unanswered questions about hcq which is annoying. 😋 Do either of you (or anyone) have thoughts on remdisivir? That drug seems to be quite popular even though the study results seemed fairly insignificant to me. 

They were "statistically significant" but small, if I remember correctly. That is, the probability of the results being observed randomly was low, so we assume it helps. (Of course, even though there's a less than 5% of the results being seen randomly, that's still 1 in 20! We could have just gotten lucky. There's a whole literature about how these results can be accidentally skewed, too...) 

I think we're going to have fewer questions about HCQ than about other drugs, lol, because there are going to be a TON of studies. At the moment, it's not looking like it does much to me, but we'll see. 

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275 new cases in Victoria today. 1 death. 

Reusable Face masks are going to be issued to all staff and students in schools. Teachers can chose not to wear the mask in the classroom at their own discretion but need to wear the mask when not actively teaching. Students need to wear a mask or scarf at all times unless eating. Only year 11 and 12 and special school students are back to school in Melbourne greater area. The rest are to be taught at home 

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This sounds promising. 

Quote

The preliminary results of a clinical trial suggest a new treatment for Covid-19 dramatically reduces the number of patients needing intensive care, according to the UK company that developed it.

The treatment from Southampton-based biotech Synairgen uses a protein called interferon beta which the body produces when it gets a viral infection.

The protein is inhaled directly into the lungs of patients with coronavirus, using a nebuliser, in the hope that it will stimulate an immune response.

The initial findings suggest the treatment cut the odds of a Covid-19 patient in hospital developing severe disease - such as requiring ventilation - by 79%.

...

If it does get approval, the drug and the nebulisers used to deliver it would then need to be manufactured in large quantities.

Mr Marsden says he instructed companies to start producing supplies back in April to ensure they would be available should the results be positive.

He says he expects Synairgen to be able to deliver "a few 100,000" doses a month by the winter.

https://www.bbc.com/news/health-53467022

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7 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Does sound good.  I wonder how it interacts with the whole cytokine storm over active immune system thing.  

Good question. I hope we find out more soon.

 

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13 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://www.thelocal.ch/20200715/only-those-with-plastic-visors-were-infected-swiss-government-warns-against-face-shields/amp
 

just a single anecdote but this feels worth knowing about.  Particularly as some airlines are moving toward complementary face shields instead of masks.

 

Thanks so much for posting. Our pediatrician & practice are advocating for face shields as an alternative to masks, so I'm forwarding this to their office. I think we'll use a face shield only as added protection if we need to go anywhere that seems particularly risky.

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If you have some tome on your hands, UCSF gathered some of the top scientists to talk about studies regarding masks, face shields, airborne particles/aerosols, and planes (that part cuts out but they come back to him later in the podcast).  

 

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I am planning to use a face shield over a mask for me. I’ve ordered some and plan to add vinyl to decorate them with things like princess crowns, so they look less clinical and hopefully less intimidating for kids. 

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MedCram just posted this at the top of his FB link to his latest video about at-home tests. Anyone know where he gets that number? I’ve been hearing for months that case counts are greatly undercounted and the current case count can be multiplied by 10-100x  to get an accurate number. 

The current COVID-19 testing strategy in the United States is estimated by the CDC to pick up less than 10% of infections...  

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7 hours ago, Acadie said:

 

Thanks so much for posting. Our pediatrician & practice are advocating for face shields as an alternative to masks, so I'm forwarding this to their office. I think we'll use a face shield only as added protection if we need to go anywhere that seems particularly risky.

I sent the link to my oldest ds. He said from an aerodynamic perspective it is pretty obvious that a mask would be better. 

He is in Melbourne. He is using a industrial face mask with replaceable filters 

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46 minutes ago, Plum said:

MedCram just posted this at the top of his FB link to his latest video about at-home tests. Anyone know where he gets that number? I’ve been hearing for months that case counts are greatly undercounted and the current case count can be multiplied by 10-100x  to get an accurate number. 

The current COVID-19 testing strategy in the United States is estimated by the CDC to pick up less than 10% of infections...  

I'm sure that's true. I'd say about a tenth of cases. 

ETA: actually, I should check what I really think the percent is. I think it actually varies. 

Calculating, I'd guess it's more like a fifth right now.

Edited by square_25
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54 minutes ago, Plum said:

MedCram just posted this at the top of his FB link to his latest video about at-home tests. Anyone know where he gets that number? I’ve been hearing for months that case counts are greatly undercounted and the current case count can be multiplied by 10-100x  to get an accurate number. 

The current COVID-19 testing strategy in the United States is estimated by the CDC to pick up less than 10% of infections...  

This NYT article talks about where these numbers come from. The article says that this is the study that the CDC used to get those estimates. I think 10 times (or more)  is a good estimate for early on. I'm gonna second @square_25 At this point I've been assuming we are catching 20-25% of the cases.

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2 minutes ago, matrips said:

Saw this picture today.  It looks different as a picture than as just numbers.

 

 

I like the graphic, but given that lots of people get tested more than once, it would be interested to see the number of people tested, not the number of tests.

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3 minutes ago, matrips said:

Saw this picture today.  It looks different as a picture than as just numbers.

C9EF8D7E-E206-4FD0-8EB5-61A3D0724B6B.png

Hmmmmm. I'm not entirely sure what that's trying to communicate, to be honest. That there are many more tests than cases? That there are many more cases than deaths? That there are many more US citizens than tests? 

Edited by square_25
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10 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Hmmmmm. I'm not entirely sure what that's trying to communicate, to be honest. That there are many more tests than cases? That there are many more cases than deaths? That there are many more US citizens than tests? 

Am I missing a key that tells what the colors mean? 

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17 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Hmmmmm. I'm not entirely sure what that's trying to communicate, to be honest. That there are many more tests than cases? That there are many more cases than deaths? That there are many more US citizens than tests? 

Given that the source appears to something called "Ohio Liberation," I'm guessing that's supposed to show that 140,000 dead Americans is no big deal and that hardly anyone is really sick. 

ETA: Apparently "Ohio Liberation" = some guy on Facebook who makes similar graphs proving that CV19 is no worse than the flu, and is involved in organizing anti-mask rallies against the "tyranny" of Gov. DeWine.

I wonder where they got the 4.3 million cases — that's about 400K more than Worldometer lists.

Edited by Corraleno
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Just now, Corraleno said:

Given that the source appears to something called "Ohio Liberation," I'm guessing that's supposed to show that 140,000 dead Americans is no big deal and that hardly anyone is really sick. 

I wonder where they got the 4.3 million cases — that's about 400K more than Worldometer lists.

To me, those two messages seem to be opposites, lol. If hardly anyone is sick, it's going to be a lot worse when many people are ;-). 

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