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The only false positive rates I've seen were in people who were sick and continued testing positive for a long time after.  I haven't seen anything about false positives otherwise.   I'm sure the numbers are much higher than most places are reporting.

Anecdotally:  I've talked to a few people who are having increased mental health issues/increases in anxiety and suicidal ideation due to the pandemic itself (fear of getting sick) and feeling like people aren't taking it seriously (anxiety at pictures of crowds, reports of people not wearing masks, coming close to agoraphobia).  

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DS got home 3 hours ago!  ❤️❤️

Update-  my youngest is not only short of breath, coughing, dizzy, nausaues, and with headache-  she is also confused.  I called our doctor and talked with him and she is going to be going to the ER.

That's not a blanket right.  If my religion required human sacrifice, I can't practice it.  If my religion required sexual assault, I can't practice it. Freedom of religion isn't a blanket right

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9 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Yes.  But the posts above mentioned show that at this point this hasn’t happened in Aus or Netherlands in spite of restrictions so there must be another factor?

You mentioned finances and mental health as being possible differentiating factors.  I don't have overall stats for the U.S.  I was just relaying the one data point and how neither things you mentioned as possibly accounting for the difference between countries are factors for that one hospital. It was in a very young and active population who were essentially told to stay at home, get paid for doing nothing, and isolated for two weeks and then a month and then two months and then...all while watching the media do what the media does. Heck, maybe the difference is the way the media is handling this in different countries?  Maybe it is the number of hot spots a country has?  
 

There were very few covid patients in my mom's hospital, never more than one at a time.  They were all older with poor health to begin with and were discharged within a few days. None of the people under 60-65 who were diagnosed had any reason to be admitted.  Almost all of the other health services were put on hold. If it wasn't covid-related or you weren't on the verge of death, you probably weren't getting seen.  Her concerns, now that they are starting to open up, are 1. How to manage two months of backlogged appointments on top of current appointments. 2. How much extra care are all of the patients with pre-covid problems going to need because they were deemed non-essential and 3. Catching all of the illnesses, like cancer, that could have been caught and started treatment already. Outside of the few hotspots we have had, I think a lot of the hospitals here are in a similar situation. 

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3 hours ago, Malory said:

Has the new CDC estimate for fatality rate been discussed here? With the estimate being at 0.4% and asymptomatic infection at 35%, the overall fatality rate is really 0.26%, about twice that of the seasonal flu. Does this bring a little comfort?

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/planning-scenarios.html

https://techstartups.com/2020/05/24/coronavirus-fatality-rate-low-0-26-cdc-says/

Huh, that is hard to wrap my head around. I dug into this a bit deeper because it feels too optimistic. And well I think it probably is too optimistic... This is a possibly legit IFR if you could protect those over 75 (give or take 5 years). This article does a good job explaining the difference we are seeing in IFRs in different locations. And once again highlights the need to protect this segment of our population.

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2 hours ago, hopeallgoeswell said:

There were very few covid patients in my mom's hospital, never more than one at a time.  They were all older with poor health to begin with and were discharged within a few days. None of the people under 60-65 who were diagnosed had any reason to be admitted.

That is very fortunate. You understand that’s not at all how it was many places though, right? This is why opening is happening in different places at different times. At the start, we had little preparation and no plan, so the blunt instrument of closing everything was all we had. We will never know how it would have been different in places that ended up with low numbers if there had not been stay home orders. As they said at the start,  if it worked, it would look like an over reaction afterward. 

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13 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

While we are talking about China is there some kind of push to increase birthrate?  I’ve seen several things about fertility lately.  This is the latest from global times

“Chen Xiangqun, NPC deputy and Executive Vice Governor of NE China's Liaoning Province, proposes completely lifting #FamilyPlanning policies in Northeast China first. #TwoSessions”

The one child policy was changed a couple years ago. Now China encourages two babies per marriage. In fact, some provinces mandate that when people apply for marriage license, they have to pay a "deposit" of thousands of dollars, which will be returned to them  when a second child is born. My birth province has this policy for a while now. So the Chinese government firmly controls reproduction rights. People had to pay a huge fine and lose their jobs for having a second child, and now people are fore-fined at time of marriage if they do not have two children down the road.. Absurdity. Stupidity. Utmost tyranny. 

And by the way, Global Times is a well known CCP propaganda mouthpiece. 

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42 minutes ago, Plum said:

I have a question.
If you have had C19, do you need to get the vaccination? 

Maybe.  It depends on if having C19 gives you antibodies strong enough to prevent subsequent re-infection. If it does, it depends on how long those antibodies last.  When you catch a common cold (another type of coronavirus, the immunity often only lasts a few months.

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1 hour ago, StellaM said:

 

Ugh.  Rats in NYC were already a problem.

cannabalistic rats in NYC and Sydney problem is starting to sound more like the zombie apocalypse .   

I wonder about rat borne illness. 😟

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1 hour ago, JadeOrchidSong said:

The one child policy was changed a couple years ago. Now China encourages two babies per marriage. In fact, some provinces mandate that when people apply for marriage license, they have to pay a "deposit" of thousands of dollars, which will be returned to them  when a second child is born. My birth province has this policy for a while now. So the Chinese government firmly controls reproduction rights. People had to pay a huge fine and lose their jobs for having a second child, and now people are fore-fined at time of marriage if they do not have two children down the road.. Absurdity. Stupidity. Utmost tyranny. 

And by the way, Global Times is a well known CCP propaganda mouthpiece. 

Yes I know that.  I just read it to get a bit of a clue as to what’s going on and then draw my own conclusions.

 

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8 hours ago, Pen said:

 

Conspiracy theories? 

Well yes.  But I’m also wondering about whether the concern that covid may cause infertility might make them relax things a bit?

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5 hours ago, hopeallgoeswell said:

You mentioned finances and mental health as being possible differentiating factors.  I don't have overall stats for the U.S.  I was just relaying the one data point and how neither things you mentioned as possibly accounting for the difference between countries are factors for that one hospital. It was in a very young and active population who were essentially told to stay at home, get paid for doing nothing, and isolated for two weeks and then a month and then two months and then...all while watching the media do what the media does. Heck, maybe the difference is the way the media is handling this in different countries?  Maybe it is the number of hot spots a country has?  
 

There were very few covid patients in my mom's hospital, never more than one at a time.  They were all older with poor health to begin with and were discharged within a few days. None of the people under 60-65 who were diagnosed had any reason to be admitted.  Almost all of the other health services were put on hold. If it wasn't covid-related or you weren't on the verge of death, you probably weren't getting seen.  Her concerns, now that they are starting to open up, are 1. How to manage two months of backlogged appointments on top of current appointments. 2. How much extra care are all of the patients with pre-covid problems going to need because they were deemed non-essential and 3. Catching all of the illnesses, like cancer, that could have been caught and started treatment already. Outside of the few hotspots we have had, I think a lot of the hospitals here are in a similar situation. 

Yes maybe it relates to the levels of the virus itself.  

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1 hour ago, StellaM said:

I suggested that somebody feed the poor rats.  I honestly feel really terrible for them.  There are also the marauding monkey gangs.  https://www.livescience.com/macaque-fight-thailand-temple-coronavirus.html

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26 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Well yes.  But I’m also wondering about whether the concern that covid may cause infertility might make them relax things a bit?

It was already in the works before Covid was (as far as we know). So unless CV19 was planned well in advance then it at least is not entirely related.  

Otoh, it could be being pushed more now due to concerns about CV19 and sterility, or because CV19 did wipe out many more people than admitted. 

 

 

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https://amp.scmp.com/news/china/science/article/3086177/coronavirus-uses-same-strategy-hiv-dodge-immune-response-chinese?__twitter_impression=true

The novel coronavirus uses the same strategy to evade attack from the human immune system as HIV, according to a new study by Chinese scientists.

Both viruses remove marker molecules on the surface of an infected cell that are used by the immune system to identify invaders, the researchers said in a non-peer reviewed paper posted on preprint website bioRxiv.org on Sunday. They warned that this commonality could mean Sars-CoV-2, the clinical name for the virus, could be around for some time, like HIV.

Virologist Zhang Hui and a team from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou also said their discovery added weight to clinical observations that the coronavirus was showing “some characteristics of viruses causing chronic infection”.

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4 hours ago, kand said:

That is very fortunate. You understand that’s not at all how it was many places though, right? This is why opening is happening in different places at different times. At the start, we had little preparation and no plan, so the blunt instrument of closing everything was all we had. We will never know how it would have been different in places that ended up with low numbers if there had not been stay home orders. As they said at the start,  if it worked, it would look like an over reaction afterward. 

Yes, it is very fortunate, and yes, I understand exponential growth. I also understand closing down for a few weeks to get a handle on the situation. People in my area have been under a SIP order since March 23 and it's still in place. There have been very few cases where I am, an hour away from Seattle, even though for the last eight weeks instead of coming into contact with people at work (a place where contact tracing would be relatively painless), people have been coming into contact with others in droves at grocery stores, Lowes, Target, Walmart, and outside of work.  I don't understand closing down a country as big as America all at the same time for almost two months.  Most areas were prepared to open up after a month and then maybe people would have taken rolling shutdowns in hotspots a little more seriously and with a better overall outlook.  Chicken Little is still a story told to children for a reason.  Opening is happening in different times in different states, which I do understand, but the states that are opening up are getting smeared in the mainstream media as places where governors want people to die. I totally get that this is a crazy situation all the way around and hindsight is 20/20.  

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56 minutes ago, hopeallgoeswell said:

Yes, it is very fortunate, and yes, I understand exponential growth. I also understand closing down for a few weeks to get a handle on the situation. People in my area have been under a SIP order since March 23 and it's still in place. There have been very few cases where I am, an hour away from Seattle, even though for the last eight weeks instead of coming into contact with people at work (a place where contact tracing would be relatively painless), people have been coming into contact with others in droves at grocery stores, Lowes, Target, Walmart, and outside of work.  I don't understand closing down a country as big as America all at the same time for almost two months.  Most areas were prepared to open up after a month and then maybe people would have taken rolling shutdowns in hotspots a little more seriously and with a better overall outlook.  Chicken Little is still a story told to children for a reason.  Opening is happening in different times in different states, which I do understand, but the states that are opening up are getting smeared in the mainstream media as places where governors want people to die. I totally get that this is a crazy situation all the way around and hindsight is 20/20.  

 

If you are that close to Seattle, I assume you are in Washington.  Isn’t all of Washington at least in “phase 1” reopening and some of it already in “phase 2”?

 I am currently in Oregon and my impression is that Washington is a little ahead of Oregon, not behind Oregon on reopening.

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1 hour ago, hopeallgoeswell said:

Yes, it is very fortunate, and yes, I understand exponential growth. I also understand closing down for a few weeks to get a handle on the situation. People in my area have been under a SIP order since March 23 and it's still in place. There have been very few cases where I am, an hour away from Seattle, even though for the last eight weeks instead of coming into contact with people at work (a place where contact tracing would be relatively painless), people have been coming into contact with others in droves at grocery stores, Lowes, Target, Walmart, and outside of work.  I don't understand closing down a country as big as America all at the same time for almost two months.  Most areas were prepared to open up after a month and then maybe people would have taken rolling shutdowns in hotspots a little more seriously and with a better overall outlook.  Chicken Little is still a story told to children for a reason.  Opening is happening in different times in different states, which I do understand, but the states that are opening up are getting smeared in the mainstream media as places where governors want people to die. I totally get that this is a crazy situation all the way around and hindsight is 20/20.  

24 counties in Washington state are already in phase 2.  More have been given the green light to apply for phase 2.  You are misrepresenting the situation. 

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10 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

If you are that close to Seattle, I assume you are in Washington.  Isn’t all of Washington at least in “phase 1” reopening and some of it already in “phase 2”?

 I am currently in Oregon and my impression is that Washington is a little ahead of Oregon, not behind Oregon on reopening.

Yes, even the counties not in stage 2 yet are in phase 1 and phase 1 restrictions are being relaxed as well. 

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1 hour ago, hopeallgoeswell said:

Yes, it is very fortunate, and yes, I understand exponential growth. I also understand closing down for a few weeks to get a handle on the situation. People in my area have been under a SIP order since March 23 and it's still in place. There have been very few cases where I am, an hour away from Seattle, even though for the last eight weeks instead of coming into contact with people at work (a place where contact tracing would be relatively painless), people have been coming into contact with others in droves at grocery stores, Lowes, Target, Walmart, and outside of work.  I don't understand closing down a country as big as America all at the same time for almost two months.  Most areas were prepared to open up after a month and then maybe people would have taken rolling shutdowns in hotspots a little more seriously and with a better overall outlook.  Chicken Little is still a story told to children for a reason.  Opening is happening in different times in different states, which I do understand, but the states that are opening up are getting smeared in the mainstream media as places where governors want people to die. I totally get that this is a crazy situation all the way around and hindsight is 20/20.  

I don’t think it’s true that most areas were prepared to open up after a month in terms of adequate PPE and testing. Heck, by that point here the largest hospital in the state couldn’t even test for flu, let alone the virus, due to a shortage of swabs, and we are a low case/death state. Now, had the federal government taken it more seriously and had their act together from the beginning, perhaps then the initial shut down could have been much shorter in many places or even not necessary in some pretty rural areas. But we started so far behind the curve in the US that there was no way it wasn’t going to be incredibly painful on multiple levels. And all the divisiveness now is likely also going to cause more pain and suffering of all sorts, compared to the alternative of having unifying leadership.

Also, shutdowns varied greatly by state. For instance, manufacturing and construction never shut down in my state, as long as safety guidelines could be followed. A fairly wide variety of retail businesses were also allowed to remain open. I’m not sure I understand your point about work and contact tracing as people would still need groceries, household items, etc. Plus, prolonged exposure in indoor work environments is generally much riskier than being a store customer.

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Daily new cases ticking back up in Israel, 6 weeks after gradual reopening began and 2 weeks after the school system fully reopened.  36 new cases yesterday, the highest number since early May.  It looks like most of the new cases are linked to school outbreaks.  Not great.

The schools -- and everything else -- were supposed to reopen in a very slow, careful, limited process, but that all got more or less thrown out the window.  Part of it was due to the changeover to a new government, but there was also a tremendous rush back to 'normal.'  

We're heading into a holiday weekend when testing will surely be down and lots of people will be gathering.  I guess we'll see what happens.

 

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12 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://amp.scmp.com/news/china/science/article/3086177/coronavirus-uses-same-strategy-hiv-dodge-immune-response-chinese?__twitter_impression=true

The novel coronavirus uses the same strategy to evade attack from the human immune system as HIV, according to a new study by Chinese scientists.

Both viruses remove marker molecules on the surface of an infected cell that are used by the immune system to identify invaders, the researchers said in a non-peer reviewed paper posted on preprint website bioRxiv.org on Sunday. They warned that this commonality could mean Sars-CoV-2, the clinical name for the virus, could be around for some time, like HIV.

Virologist Zhang Hui and a team from Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou also said their discovery added weight to clinical observations that the coronavirus was showing “some characteristics of viruses causing chronic infection”.

This is, IMO, extremely important, so I am quoting mainly to bring it back to people’s attention  who might have missed it above.  

The article is much easier to read than the study—but the study is, IMO, so far (I’m less than 1/4 way through) more worrisome than the article paints it. 

 

11 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Original study here - not peer reviewed yet.

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.05.24.111823v1.full.pdf

 

I am very slowly working my way through the original study.

If it hasn’t been already it should probably be cross-posted on the scientific developments thread for people who aren’t following this long thread.  IMO it is extremely important, and will affect testing, vaccines, and treatments.

 

And it is very concerning as things are opening up. And as people think they are “done” and acting like it is pretty much all over.  Or pretty much like they are going to get it and it will be no big deal.  

 

Even though many cases are Asymptomatic in an obvious immediate way (no cough, fever etc) it looks like there might could be a destructive immune system effect that could emerge and be more debilitating later on in life.

I wonder if people would pay more attention if it were called something more similar to AIDS-like SARS-CoV-2 and AIDS-20?

 

 

 

[I suspect this may also have to do with part of why China is trying to identify every single last case in Wuhan.] 

 

[whispering...it also seems to fit with what Luc Montagnier said...  and it also may be of relevance in re the HCQ issue  ...] 

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2 minutes ago, Pen said:

This is, IMO, extremely important, so I am quoting mainly to bring it back to people’s attention  who might have missed it above.  

The article is much easier to read than the study—but the study is, IMO, so far (I’m less than 1/4 way through) more worrisome than the article paints it. 

 

 

I am very slowly working my way through the original study.

If it hasn’t been already it should probably be cross-posted on the scientific developments thread for people who aren’t following this long thread.  IMO it is extremely important, and will affect testing, vaccines, and treatments.

 

And it is very concerning as things are opening up. And as people think they are “done” and acting like it is pretty much all over.  Or pretty much like they are going to get it and it will be no big deal.  

 

Even though many cases are Asymptomatic in an obvious immediate way (no cough, fever etc) it looks like there might could be a destructive immune system effect that could emerge and be more debilitating later on in life.

I wonder if people would pay more attention if it were called something more similar to AIDS-like SARS-CoV-2 and AIDS-20?

 

 

 

[I suspect this may also have to do with part of why China is trying to identify every single last case in Wuhan.] 

 

[whispering...it also seems to fit with what Luc Montagnier said...  and it also may be of relevance in re the HCQ issue  ...] 

We have had a second case in Aus now where someone became ill apparently around 80 days after exposure.  There may be some underlying missed transmission but it’s concerning.  I won’t worry too much unless there are further studies showing the same thing but 😬

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1 hour ago, JennyD said:

Daily new cases ticking back up in Israel, 6 weeks after gradual reopening began and 2 weeks after the school system fully reopened.  36 new cases yesterday, the highest number since early May.  It looks like most of the new cases are linked to school outbreaks.  Not great.

The schools -- and everything else -- were supposed to reopen in a very slow, careful, limited process, but that all got more or less thrown out the window.  Part of it was due to the changeover to a new government, but there was also a tremendous rush back to 'normal.'  

We're heading into a holiday weekend when testing will surely be down and lots of people will be gathering.  I guess we'll see what happens.

 

Same thing happening here with the back to normal rush.

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I'm pretty much all better--no thanks to the medical care available.

My aunt and uncle in Texas have it now. She is mildly sick at home; he's in the hospital but not ICU. They're in their early 60s.

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4 minutes ago, whitehawk said:

I'm pretty much all better--no thanks to the medical care available.

My aunt and uncle in Texas have it now. She is mildly sick at home; he's in the hospital but not ICU. They're in their early 60s.

Glad you are better! Sorry your aunt and uncle are sick!

My school friend - 55 ish has been home for a couple of weeks. He just posted that his kidneys have finally started improving and he was able to skip 2 dialysis sessions and is hopefully on the way to stopping dialysis completely. My cousin's husband continues to do well and is starting back to work in stages in June.

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https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/05/27/science.abc6197
 

mask science

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations for social distancing of 6 ft and hand washing to reduce the spread of SARS-CoV-2 are based on studies of respiratory droplets carried out in the 1930s. These studies showed that large, ~100 μm droplets produced in coughs and sneezes quickly underwent gravitational settling (1). However, when these studies were conducted, the technology did not exist for detecting submicron aerosols. As a comparison, calculations predict that in still air, a 100-μm droplet will settle to the ground from 8 ft in 4.6 s whereas a 1-μm aerosol particle will take 12.4 hours (4). Measurements now show that intense coughs and sneezes that propel larger droplets more than 20 ft can also create thousands of aerosols that can travel even further (1). Increasing evidence for SARS-CoV-2 suggests the 6 ft WHO recommendation is likely not enough under many indoor conditions where aerosols can remain airborne for hours, accumulate over time, and follow air flows over distances further than 6 ft (5, 10).

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2 hours ago, Susan in TX said:

 

Low Vitamin D (and other nutrient lack) should not be discounted.

 In many places the darker the skin the more problems with CV19 there seem to be, even amongst people in higher socio economic groups.  For example, darker skinned doctors in UK.  And the darker the skin pigment, the harder it is to make ones own vitamin D from sunshine (and cholesterol). 

 

Healthy in Seven Days: Success through vitamin D treatment https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MHO7LKY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_vVd0EbGVJFA04

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00MHO7LKY/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_vVd0EbGVJFA04

 

https://youtu.be/JVg8opQkQXc

 

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https://amp.theguardian.com/science/2020/may/28/questions-raised-over-hydroxychloroquine-study-which-caused-who-to-halt-trials-for-covid-19?__twitter_impression=true
 

the Lancet study that reviewed round the world hospital figures for hydroxychloroquine etc had wrong numbers for deaths for Australia for the dates used.  Statistically this wouldn’t make much difference but means the data needs checking fairly carefully.

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11 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-2567
 

More mask science - specifically for cloth masks this time.

 

I thought this was especially interesting and not something I’d seen before:

“Further evidence to suggest that masks work
This ecologic analysis by Leffler et al also supports the use of masks in public cloth or not. "In countries with cultural norms or government policies supporting public mask-wearing, per-capita coronavirus mortality increased on average by just 5.4% each week, as compared with 48% each week countries that did not wear masks." https://www.researchgate.net/publication/341539484_Association_of_country-wide_coronavirus_mortality_with_demographics_testing_lockdowns_and_public_wearing_of_masks”

 

 

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Interestingly the advice here today has changed from masks are not recommended to masks are not required at this time due to low community transmission however wearing of masks is a personal choice.

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1 hour ago, Ausmumof3 said:

https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-2567
 

More mask science - specifically for cloth masks this time.

Thanks for this. There are a number of interesting findings here that I'm surprised not to have heard before now. It was also the first time I'd heard what kind of cloth mask was used in that blasted MacIntyre study people like to cite--they called it "an unusually inefficient mask". On outward transmission:

Quote

Outward protection for cloth masks was extensively studied decades ago, and the results are highly relevant today. Compared with bacteria recovery from unmasked volunteers, a mask made of muslin and flannel reduced bacteria recovered on agar sedimentation plates by 99.3% to 99.9%, total airborne microorganisms by 99.5% to 99.8%, and bacteria recovered from aerosols (<4 µm) by 88% to 99% (6). A similar experiment in 1975 compared 4 medical masks and 1 commercially produced reusable mask made of 4 layers of cotton muslin (7). Filtration efficiency, assessed by bacterial counts, was 96% to 99% for the medical masks and 99% for the cloth mask; for aerosols (<3.3 µm), it was 72% to 89% and 89%, respectively.

 

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53 minutes ago, kand said:

Thanks for this. There are a number of interesting findings here that I'm surprised not to have heard before now. It was also the first time I'd heard what kind of cloth mask was used in that blasted MacIntyre study people like to cite--they called it "an unusually inefficient mask".

 

Apparently only around a 3% filtration, for the cloth mask in MacIntyre, didn’t it say?

 

 

 

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There are twitter videos showing apartments on mudanjiang in china being placed into lockdown and claims that transport to and from there is being suspended.  

according to Global Times

“About 90 percent of trains at Mudanjiang railway station in NE China's Heilongjiang Province have been suspended after the city reported 5 new cases of asymptomatic #coronavirus infections on Tue. It is still unknown when the services would resume.”

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4 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

There are twitter videos showing apartments on mudanjiang in china being placed into lockdown and claims that transport to and from there is being suspended.  

according to Global Times

“About 90 percent of trains at Mudanjiang railway station in NE China's Heilongjiang Province have been suspended after the city reported 5 new cases of asymptomatic #coronavirus infections on Tue. It is still unknown when the services would resume.”

I know we don’t know what the real figures are but it makes me nervous how big their reaction is to seemingly small numbers. Keeps making me think they know something we don’t.

I read a post last night from a dr in a town about 100 miles from me who said the level of positive cases in the hospital there’s catchment area have increased over 800% In the last 14 days. The number itself is quite low, in the 30s, but from those reports from China it sounds like they would be taking pretty extensive action. We, on the other hand, have crowded pool parties!

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45 minutes ago, TCB said:

I know we don’t know what the real figures are but it makes me nervous how big their reaction is to seemingly small numbers. Keeps making me think they know something we don’t.

 

Probably so.  

 

People have said pay attention to what the Chinese **do** not what they say. 

 

45 minutes ago, TCB said:

I read a post last night from a dr in a town about 100 miles from me who said the level of positive cases in the hospital there’s catchment area have increased over 800% In the last 14 days. The number itself is quite low, in the 30s, but from those reports from China it sounds like they would be taking pretty extensive action. We, on the other hand, have crowded pool parties!

 

 🙈🙉🙊

🥶

I hope we survive—at the moment China seems to be doing much better than we are in that regard, even not believing the figures. 

 

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56 minutes ago, TCB said:

I know we don’t know what the real figures are but it makes me nervous how big their reaction is to seemingly small numbers. Keeps making me think they know something we don’t.

I read a post last night from a dr in a town about 100 miles from me who said the level of positive cases in the hospital there’s catchment area have increased over 800% In the last 14 days. The number itself is quite low, in the 30s, but from those reports from China it sounds like they would be taking pretty extensive action. We, on the other hand, have crowded pool parties!

I suspect the numbers just don’t make sense.   

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11 minutes ago, Acadie said:

Has this been posted anywhere? Covid as blood vessel disease--potential avenue for better pharmaceutical treatments.

https://elemental.medium.com/coronavirus-may-be-a-blood-vessel-disease-which-explains-everything-2c4032481ab2

I feel like I've seen this theorized before. This is just more detailed look at the idea.

 

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25 minutes ago, Acadie said:

Has this been posted anywhere? Covid as blood vessel disease--potential avenue for better pharmaceutical treatments.

https://elemental.medium.com/coronavirus-may-be-a-blood-vessel-disease-which-explains-everything-2c4032481ab2

The mention of the study that found that ACE inhibitors and statins may be protective against Covid 19 really shows how important it is to do proper trials and use caution when we don't understand a disease well. I remember, early on, that there was a question that ACE inhibitors actually increased risk because of the ACE II receptors and I think there were a number of people who changed medications just in case. My dh is on an ARB med and at one point I said to him that he should maybe call his dr and see about changing it, and then I watched one of the Medcram podcasts that said that there was also a possibility that they could be protective so we decided to hold off on trying to change.

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Oregonians:

public feedback is currently being solicited by state health authority in re health  care

issues   Link on OHA website. 

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As if 2020 couldn't get any weirder.... monkeys attacked a medical worker in India and stole 4 vials of blood from Covid-positive patients 😳

 

(Reuters) - A troop of monkeys in India attacked a medical official and snatched away blood samples of patients who had tested positive for the novel coronavirus, authorities said on Friday.

The attack occurred this week when a laboratory technician was walking in the campus of a state-run medical college in Meerut, 460 km (285 miles) north of Lucknow, capital of Uttar Pradesh state.

"Monkeys grabbed and fled with the blood samples of four COVID-19 patients who are undergoing treatment ... we had to take their blood samples again," said Dr S. K. Garg, a top official at the college.

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Just now, Corraleno said:

Pretty sure this is how Planet of the Apes started.  

Though, looking around, I, for one, welcome my ape overlords.  I'm thinking they've got to be an improvement.  More environmentally minded, for one thing.

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