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It looks like worldometer's source for Sweden is https://experience.arcgis.com/experience/09f821667ce64bf7be6f9f87457ed9aa

I have no idea what is going on with their numbers no matter the source. I admit to being jaded on all the numbers knowing very few countries are testing enough, many places are undercounting their dead, and some places may be flat out lying. Plus, the tests may have false negatives and maybe even the rare false positive! Watch me throw my hands up in frustration!

I'm beginning to think people will get to the point that they won't stand for shutdowns, everything will open back up, and then most people will just get inured to the deaths. I am doubtful we will ever get enough testing to keep track of where outbreaks are. The testing guidelines are simply too narrow.

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DS got home 3 hours ago!  ❤️❤️

Update-  my youngest is not only short of breath, coughing, dizzy, nausaues, and with headache-  she is also confused.  I called our doctor and talked with him and she is going to be going to the ER.

Thought I'd post a pic of my dd, getting ready to spend another day in a coronavirus triage tent!  

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37 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

I think that nursing homes need far more tight precautions—especially as states start to “open”—

it could include some tightly controlled family visitors, perhaps 4 visitors per 50 bed unit who can come repeatedly during a month with test for CV19 at start and restrictions on what they do, and visit and look at conditions for all residents, not just own family

plus tighter, not looser, cautions regarding caregivers and staff.  PPE, testing, protocols, single facility work ...  

visitors can very quickly not only cause all the problems of staff, but may also be from farther away such that a visitor from one city drives from, say, San Diego to Seattle and back, visiting friends and family (including elders in Nursing Homes) along the way, and quickly spreads infection along the route travelled

Especially if states have just opened and lots of people are antsy to visit their elders that could happen quite a lot.  And summer could easily bring both travel up down a major interstate, but also bicoastal travel in various ways, including from NYC and Boston to areas much further than Rhode Island.  And it becomes much more easy also to drive across Cascades/Sierras  and Rocky Mountains in summer, possibly spreading more infection into the current low case rate states, where any one case seeded into any one home can become another Kirkland...

My mother’s rural out of the way area became a CV19 area due to just one infectious traveller from NYC (~ 1000 miles away).  Had that infectious person visited a nursing home there could have easily been many more cases including ICU requiring ones, and there are no local to them ICU type beds at all for around 150 miles. 

 

Although there is some logic in your suggestion here, I can promise that idea won't fly.

I would not be content with having a stranger that I don't know at all, and whose intentions and attention to detail I don't know, be responsible for checking on my mom. If I happened to be one of  the people charged with checking on everyone's family members, I would have no idea how to go about that, because I would have no knowledge from before of the state of health of those individuals. When I visit my mom now (or did visit, before restrictions), I would of course see the other residents. But seeing the other residents told me nothing about their health or the care they were receiving. On the other hand, I could tell things about what was happening with MY mom, because I know my mom.

Also, how would they choose the designated family members? And how will the designated people communicate with the other families? Who would want to take on such a role of responsibility for people they don't know? How angry will the family members who are left out be?

It opens up a can of worms, frankly.

A better first solution would be to have one person only from each family allowed to come in on a limited basis (perhaps by appointment; although for preventing abuse, it's best for visitors to be allowed to come any time, but appointments would be better than nothing), and to establish screening procedures for that person, similar to what they do for staff members.

I think we are quite a ways from that being allowed, but eventually permitting one family member to enter would be a first step to re-opening.

In our state, nursing homes are one common type of hot zone. My mother's nursing home has four cases. She herself was negative (just found that out this morning), but that only gives a small measure of comfort, because she could be exposed at any time, or it could have been a false negative test. So it's good news for now, but actually not good news, because there is spread happening there, and Mom remains at great risk.

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San Francisco https://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2020/04/15/coronavirus-san-francisco-school-officials-give-students-a-grades-closures/
“EASY A? 
Most San Francisco Unified School District board members expressed support at a meeting Tuesday night to giving all middle and high school students A’s for the remainder of the year due to coronavirus school closures affecting their education.“

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Nursing home question here.

For those with family in nursing homes, how are you finding out if there is a case at the facility?  We are in communication with the facilities, so if they announced something, we’d hear, but are they required to let us know?
 

Both of my ILs are in homes - one assisted, one nursing (don’t get me started on the necessity of separating a couple married for 64 years, gaaaah).  Both are locked down.

FIL’s facility has recently added more restrictions, though, that made us wonder about a possible case on another floor.  

If we ask directly, will they share that info, or is there a HIPPA concern here?  (Obviously we would not ask for a patient’s name!)

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16 minutes ago, Storygirl said:

Although there is some logic in your suggestion here, I can promise that idea won't fly.

I would not be content with having a stranger that I don't know at all, and whose intentions and attention to detail I don't know, be responsible for checking on my mom. If I happened to be one of  the people charged with checking on everyone's family members, I would have no idea how to go about that, because I would have no knowledge from before of the state of health of those individuals. When I visit my mom now (or did visit, before restrictions), I would of course see the other residents. But seeing the other residents told me nothing about their health or the care they were receiving. On the other hand, I could tell things about what was happening with MY mom, because I know my mom.

Also, how would they choose the designated family members? And how will the designated people communicate with the other families? Who would want to take on such a role of responsibility for people they don't know? How angry will the family members who are left out be?

It opens up a can of worms, frankly.

A better first solution would be to have one person only from each family allowed to come in on a limited basis (perhaps by appointment; although for preventing abuse, it's best for visitors to be allowed to come any time, but appointments would be better than nothing), and to establish screening procedures for that person, similar to what they do for staff members.

I think we are quite a ways from that being allowed, but eventually permitting one family member to enter would be a first step to re-opening.

In our state, nursing homes are one common type of hot zone. My mother's nursing home has four cases. She herself was negative (just found that out this morning), but that only gives a small measure of comfort, because she could be exposed at any time, or it could have been a false negative test. So it's good news for now, but actually not good news, because there is spread happening there, and Mom remains at great risk.

 

It would be nice if you could get her out entirely if she is negative.

 In my state CV19 has tended to go through nursing homes much like it does cruise ships — with very high numbers of infected. Maybe that is lessening some as the problem has been realized.  

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8 minutes ago, Spryte said:

Nursing home question here.

For those with family in nursing homes, how are you finding out if there is a case at the facility?  We are in communication with the facilities, so if they announced something, we’d hear, but are they required to let us know?
 

Both of my ILs are in homes - one assisted, one nursing (don’t get me started on the necessity of separating a couple married for 64 years, gaaaah).  Both are locked down.

FIL’s facility has recently added more restrictions, though, that made us wonder about a possible case on another floor.  

If we ask directly, will they share that info, or is there a HIPPA concern here?  (Obviously we would not ask for a patient’s name!)

I don’t actually know how my family found out. My mom has POA, so I would think she’d be the person notified if my grandmother were actually sick, but my aunt is the one who shared the news, and she’s been out of state. So, no idea.

I know NJ’s governor had been using general privacy/respect reasoning rather than HIPPA to decline public announcements. Like, no one is revealing if someone at 123 Main Street in Anywhere, USA has tested positive, and it’s the same principle with revealing a care center because it’s people’s home.

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1 minute ago, Carrie12345 said:

I don’t actually know how my family found out. My mom has POA, so I would think she’d be the person notified if my grandmother were actually sick, but my aunt is the one who shared the news, and she’s been out of state. So, no idea.

I know NJ’s governor had been using general privacy/respect reasoning rather than HIPPA to decline public announcements. Like, no one is revealing if someone at 123 Main Street in Anywhere, USA has tested positive, and it’s the same principle with revealing a care center because it’s people’s home.


Thanks.  DH is POA for both, and we are the primary contact people, so if they are informing family, one would think we’d hear.  
 

It may be that someone is in quarantine without a confirmed case.  We don’t know, but suspect.

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5 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

I’m having a difficult time with the nursing home situation, particularly in NJ. I’m not going to link the story because it upset me too much, but there was a horrible issue in a particular facility that was absolutely not dealt with properly. On the same days as reading that, we came to learn that there was a positive case in my grandmother’s facility.

It’s a little weird, because I have been operating under the assumption that her place had at least one case; that seemed to be the general assumption from the state. Other people in the family don’t interpret things the way I do though, so it’s been strange to watch them all processing while I already did days ago.

I used to work at the facility that is currently in the news, as a CNA (only made it a few months working there).   Years ago but from what I've heard, not much has changed, if anything it has gotten worse.   They offer CNA training classes there, and you work shifts while undergoing training so a good portion of CNA's working there are unlicensed.  There are very few actual nurses working there, maybe one per floor during some shifts.   The balance of CNA's are usually bused in from the cities.  A lot of people doing the work because it paid better than most other flexible work, not because they wanted to care for people.  I had another CNA threaten physical violence because I reported patient abuse.  

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25 minutes ago, Spryte said:

Nursing home question here.

For those with family in nursing homes, how are you finding out if there is a case at the facility?  We are in communication with the facilities, so if they announced something, we’d hear, but are they required to let us know?
 

Both of my ILs are in homes - one assisted, one nursing (don’t get me started on the necessity of separating a couple married for 64 years, gaaaah).  Both are locked down.

FIL’s facility has recently added more restrictions, though, that made us wonder about a possible case on another floor.  

If we ask directly, will they share that info, or is there a HIPPA concern here?  (Obviously we would not ask for a patient’s name!)

My state is handling this a little different than some it sounds like. They list every congregate care facility in the state that has even one case, whether that is a staff member or a patient. So I don't think there are privacy concerns, but I suspect states/facilities aren't going to like sharing this info. Even though my state has been very proactive, there are a boatload of cases and roughly 75% of the deaths seem to be coming from nursing homes. This is a huge problem, imo.

Anyway, if you try to ask about possible cases at your FIL's facility, I would argue with them if they cite privacy as their reason for not sharing that info. 

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5 minutes ago, TracyP said:

My state is handling this a little different than some it sounds like. They list every congregate care facility in the state that has even one case, whether that is a staff member or a patient. So I don't think there are privacy concerns, but I suspect states/facilities aren't going to like sharing this info. Even though my state has been very proactive, there are a boatload of cases and roughly 75% of the deaths seem to be coming from nursing homes. This is a huge problem, imo.

Anyway, if you try to ask about possible cases at your FIL's facility, I would argue with them if they cite privacy as their reason for not sharing that info. 

Same. My state added a new dashboard specifically for nursing homes and facilities. Of course we were also the state that had a care facility telling it’s staff to turn their masks inside out to reuse them. 
 

381D66C6-B269-46E0-AE7E-58CBBDF5157B.png

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1 hour ago, Pen said:

 

It would be nice if you could get her out entirely if she is negative.

 In my state CV19 has tended to go through nursing homes much like it does cruise ships — with very high numbers of infected. Maybe that is lessening some as the problem has been realized.  

Yes, it would be nice, but she can't be cared for at home, unfortunately. She has lived in the nursing home for 8 years, and requires intensive care.

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1 hour ago, Spryte said:

Nursing home question here.

For those with family in nursing homes, how are you finding out if there is a case at the facility?  We are in communication with the facilities, so if they announced something, we’d hear, but are they required to let us know?
 

Both of my ILs are in homes - one assisted, one nursing (don’t get me started on the necessity of separating a couple married for 64 years, gaaaah).  Both are locked down.

FIL’s facility has recently added more restrictions, though, that made us wonder about a possible case on another floor.  

If we ask directly, will they share that info, or is there a HIPPA concern here?  (Obviously we would not ask for a patient’s name!)

The nursing home called my dad when they had a staff member test positive. They called him back yesterday with the results for my mom (negative). Our state has also added a chart online that lists how many cases are in every nursing home that has cases, so I was able to look it up and see that my mom's place has four cases.

I am not a primary contact for the nursing home, so the news comes through my dad. He is not, unfortunately, the best at communicating, so I get some of my information from my sister, who gets it from Dad or sometimes hears from the nursing home staff herself (she is the second contact person, since she lives in my hometown, and I do not).

Our state is now requiring nursing facilities to contact families if there is a positive case, but that is a new guideline. Our Governor stated that he made this decision based not on privacy laws, but on what he thinks is decent and what he would want if he had family in a nursing home. But they did have to run it by the lawyers, I think, so it took a few days to go into effect.

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II thought it would help if Social Influencers helped to get public to embrace physical Distancing etc.  — then lost some hope for that when I saw Basketball star touching all the microphones and Gwyneth Paltrow (iirc) comments indicating she doesn’t seem to believe in the virus, or whatever— don’t recall details, just that I stopped thinking that would help.

 

But Finland did it, and looking at Finland as having lowest CV19 deaths per thousand population,(eta) of the relatively similar Scandinavian countries each doing things in somewhat different ways — maybe it has helped.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/01/finland-enlists-social-influencers-in-fight-against-covid-19

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36 minutes ago, Pen said:

I thought it would help if Social Influencers helped to get public to embrace physical Distancing etc.  — then lost some hope for that when I saw Basketball star touching all the microphones and Gwyneth Paltrow (iirc) comments indicating she doesn’t seem to believe in the virus, or whatever— don’t recall details, just that I stopped thinking that would help.

 

But Finland did it, and looking at Finland as having lowest CV19 deaths per thousand population, maybe it has helped.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/01/finland-enlists-social-influencers-in-fight-against-covid-19

A couple of the channels I watch have celebrities encouraging people to basically "hang in there"  (CBS? has the "we're all in this together" campaign) and I've seen some others.  Just yesterday they had a bunch of people I didn't recognize giving the message.  I then realized that I didn't recognize them because they were Social Media Influencers (Instagram, Youtube etc.)  so obviously I wasn't their targeted demographic.  😉 

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2 hours ago, Arcadia said:

“EASY A? 
Most San Francisco Unified School District board members expressed support at a meeting Tuesday night to giving all middle and high school students A’s for the remainder of the year due to coronavirus school closures affecting their education.“

A couple of colleges have gone to this model. Either A or A- for everyone.

Edited by RootAnn
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1 hour ago, Plum said:

Same. My state added a new dashboard specifically for nursing homes and facilities. Of course we were also the state that had a care facility telling it’s staff to turn their masks inside out to reuse them. 
 

381D66C6-B269-46E0-AE7E-58CBBDF5157B.png


That’s a nice service.  I did some digging, and a week ago our state’s health dept refused to release names of facilities with positive cases, unless they specifically had the permission of the facility.  (Sigh)  They cited a specific state code.  So here, it seems that family and even some healthcare workers are only finding out through the grapevine or on the news if it gets out.  That’s disappointing. A lot of workers work at more than one facility.

FIL’s facility has been locked down for some time, but residents were allowed to ride the elevator to a different floor to get books or puzzles for their rooms, if wearing a mask.  They are no longer allowed on the elevators at all.  It’s a significant change, and the residents think there could be a case on another floor, but it’s not confirmed.

MIL’s facility has had that level of lockdown the whole time.  It’s possible that FIL’s home has just tightened up, but we don’t know.
 

DH and I will ask directly, but who knows if we will get a straight answer.  We have been dealing with another issue.  They were apparently short staffed over the weekend, and FIL didn’t get much care.  It’s very frustrating.  They told us several people were out sick. So, feeling concerned.

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17 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

A couple of colleges have gone to this model. Either A or A- for everyone.

I can understand colleges doing that. We joked about compassionate As.
The school districts don’t grade the same way though so high school GPAs would be impacted differently even in the same city as San Jose, California for example is comprise of a few school districts. 

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3 minutes ago, Spryte said:


That’s a nice service.  I did some digging, and a week ago our state’s health dept refused to release names of facilities with positive cases, unless they specifically had the permission of the facility.  (Sigh)  They cited a specific state code.  So here, it seems that family and even some healthcare workers are only finding out through the grapevine or on the news if it gets out.  That’s disappointing. A lot of workers work at more than one facility.

FIL’s facility has been locked down for some time, but residents were allowed to ride the elevator to a different floor to get books or puzzles for their rooms, if wearing a mask.  They are no longer allowed on the elevators at all.  It’s a significant change, and the residents think there could be a case on another floor, but it’s not confirmed.

MIL’s facility has had that level of lockdown the whole time.  It’s possible that FIL’s home has just tightened up, but we don’t know.
 

DH and I will ask directly, but who knows if we will get a straight answer.  We have been dealing with another issue.  They were apparently short staffed over the weekend, and FIL didn’t get much care.  It’s very frustrating.  They told us several people were out sick. So, feeling concerned.

Once again, it looks like it depends on the governor or state laws or who knows.  

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Our public school district put out a message saying that teachers would still be grading and giving feedback on assignments. But that remote learning grades would not lower any student's GPA; they will base the course grade upon last quarter, if the student's grades drop. So students can improve their grades ( I think), but they won't be penalized if their grades get worse.

My kids could read this message on their Chromebooks, and maybe they did, but I did not bring it to their attention. I have one child who would decide that he didn't need to do any work any more, so I didn't want him to notice the policy. My other kids are doing fine grade-wise, so the policy doesn't impact them, anyway.

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Strain of the virus in India could show current vaccine work is futile.

However, the way I read it, the mutation might be less deadly in that it wouldn't bind to the ACE2 receptor the same way.

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/science/article/3079678/coronavirus-mutation-threatens-race-develop-vaccine

 

A coronavirus strain isolated in India carried a mutation that could upend vaccine development around the globe, according to researchers from Australia and Taiwan.

The researchers found that the mutation occurred in the spike protein’s receptor-binding domain (RBD).

A computer simulation shows that the RBD mutation, which was not found in other variants across the globe, could remove a hydrogen bond from the spike protein.

Without this bond, the virus may be less likely to bind with ACE2, or angiotensin converting enzyme-2, which is found in the lungs and other organs.

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1 hour ago, RootAnn said:

A couple of colleges have gone to this model. Either A or A- for everyone.

 

4 hours ago, Storygirl said:

Although there is some logic in your suggestion here, I can promise that idea won't fly.

I would not be content with having a stranger that I don't know at all, and whose intentions and attention to detail I don't know, be responsible for checking on my mom. If I happened to be one of  the people charged with checking on everyone's family members, I would have no idea how to go about that, because I would have no knowledge from before of the state of health of those individuals. When I visit my mom now (or did visit, before restrictions), I would of course see the other residents. But seeing the other residents told me nothing about their health or the care they were receiving. On the other hand, I could tell things about what was happening with MY mom, because I know my mom.

Also, how would they choose the designated family members? And how will the designated people communicate with the other families? Who would want to take on such a role of responsibility for people they don't know? How angry will the family members who are left out be?

It opens up a can of worms, frankly.

A better first solution would be to have one person only from each family allowed to come in on a limited basis (perhaps by appointment; although for preventing abuse, it's best for visitors to be allowed to come any time, but appointments would be better than nothing), and to establish screening procedures for that person, similar to what they do for staff members.

I think we are quite a ways from that being allowed, but eventually permitting one family member to enter would be a first step to re-opening.

In our state, nursing homes are one common type of hot zone. My mother's nursing home has four cases. She herself was negative (just found that out this morning), but that only gives a small measure of comfort, because she could be exposed at any time, or it could have been a false negative test. So it's good news for now, but actually not good news, because there is spread happening there, and Mom remains at great risk.

 

The only way to prevent care homes from becoming hotbeds is for the staff to live on site. And for a whole lot of reasons, that is just not going to happen. 

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1 hour ago, RootAnn said:

A couple of colleges have gone to this model. Either A or A- for everyone.

 

What about just using pass/fail? That way the credit is earned (or not) but the GPA is unaffected. That’s what some of our local public high schools are doing, where necessary. 

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25 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

What about just using pass/fail? That way the credit is earned (or not) but the GPA is unaffected. That’s what some of our local public high schools are doing, where necessary. 

Some are doing this. Others don't want to disadvantage premed & students applying for grad school as certain prereq require a certain letter grade. It'll be a mess....

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5 hours ago, Spryte said:

Nursing home question here.

For those with family in nursing homes, how are you finding out if there is a case at the facility?  We are in communication with the facilities, so if they announced something, we’d hear, but are they required to let us know?
 

Both of my ILs are in homes - one assisted, one nursing (don’t get me started on the necessity of separating a couple married for 64 years, gaaaah).  Both are locked down.

FIL’s facility has recently added more restrictions, though, that made us wonder about a possible case on another floor.  

If we ask directly, will they share that info, or is there a HIPPA concern here?  (Obviously we would not ask for a patient’s name!)

In Dallas County, facilities are required to notify residents, their families, and staff within six hours of learning of a confirmed case, and local news has reported names of numerous Dallas area facilities with virus clusters.

 

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1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

 

What about just using pass/fail? That way the credit is earned (or not) but the GPA is unaffected. That’s what some of our local public high schools are doing, where necessary. 

Some licensing boards will not accept coursework that has been Pass/Fail toward meeting professional requirements.   Some employers who reimburse students for classes base the percentage on a final course grade.  Some students are working toward bringing their GPA up and worked very hard during the first half of the semester and giving them simply a "pass" would penalize them. 

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@Pen 

Eugene School District 4J Facebook’s post (Oregon)

😄While schools buildings are closed, high school students on the South Eugene Robotics Team are innovating creative solutions to a pandemic problem. Team members are working with their mentors and a UO biology researcher to design and fabricate face shields for front-line workers using just the tools they have at home. So far, they have created 38 shields for grocery store workers and veterinarians.

But, they got big news yesterday! The chief medical officer at Oregon Medical Group approved their design for medical use and has requested 200 face shields for doctors and other medical personnel who treat patients with respiratory symptoms. So, they are ramping up production.

The students 3D print the mask parts at home, mentors cut the polycarbonate shields and the UO researcher assembles them—all while following social distancing guidelines. A team approach! #4JBetterTogether”

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New Vitamin D paper, Dr Gareth Davies (PhD), Dr Joanna Byers (MBChB), Dr Attila R Garami (MD, PhD)

"Low Vitamin D occurs in 90% of patients with ARDS."  

Long, but shows mechanism of how D could help, also shows graph of deaths vs. latitude.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ka7h4fbi7xdz9s9/Covid-19 and Vitamin D Information.pdf?dl=0

They have a poster for hospitals, they want tracking, testing, and treatment of all Covid patients' vitamin D levels, and recommend that all hospital staff take daily D3 supplements.  Poster: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ROn9Si3jXQzfgAwijH4JMv-n7wYJwrAMAefIM4kULkg/edit

Vitamin D is correlated with many of the factors of COVID.

Age: https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/time-for-more-vitamin-d

Obesity: https://www.livescience.com/26961-obesity-causes-vitamin-d-deficiency.html

Race: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/vitamin-d-coronavirus-gap-liz-brown/

Edited by ElizabethB
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8 hours ago, Storygirl said:

Yes, it would be nice, but she can't be cared for at home, unfortunately. She has lived in the nursing home for 8 years, and requires intensive care.

 

I’m so sorry.  That must be difficult for you both.

And depending on your State readiness to reopen and ability to progress successfully through showing success with a reopening, it might be quite a while before an irl visit is possible. 

Many of us may not get final irl visits with older relatives. 

 

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10 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

Question:

If a city’s mayor extends a SAH order til June 1, then the governor extends a SAH order til May 20, which applies to the city?

I’m pretty sure the residents and businesses of that city have to follow the later date, but need some backup. 

Hmmm well we are in the opposite situation. If it were up to my mayor, she would open it now. Since we haven’t opened, I would guess the governor has authority over the mayor and you have to go by that date. But wow that’s a confusing position to be in. 

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New figures: 

Worldwide Deaths

April 14 130,400 10 days to double (128000)

April 4 64700 7 days to double (64000)

March 28 31000 5 days to double (32000)

March 23 16500 6 days to double (16000)

March 17 8000 8 days to double

March 9 4000 20 days to double

Feb 18 2000

 

U.S. Deaths

April 14 29,800 6 days to double (29184)

April 8 14,800 5 days to double (14592)

April 3 7400 3 days to double (7296)

March 31 3900 3 days to double (3648)

March 28 2200 3 days to double (1824)

March 25 1030 2 days to double (912)

March 23 550 3 days to double (456)

March 20 250 3 days to double (228)

March 17 110 3 days to double (114)

March 14 57

It would have taken longer for US deaths to double, but New York reworked how they calculate deaths (I think there were many deaths at nursing homes, etc. that were never tested and not being counted), and including those bumped the overall numbers up by like 5,000 deaths. 😞

So, the slowing trend continues, but it hasn’t slowed that much, really. The next doubling will bring us to that 60k number the IHME model was projecting (I think they have since revised that up to 68k -  which we aren’t supposed to hit it until June....).

 

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On 4/15/2020 at 12:53 AM, StellaM said:

 

 

Parents here who want their children back in school for social reasons need to be doing some heavy duty lobbying of government to provide adequate health protection for teachers and support staff.

A basic here that needs to be met before sending kids back is that school cleaners need their contracted hours extended so they can spend more than 4 min per classroom as it is at my school atm. 

I am a bit tired of being told to work in unsafe conditions 'for the kids'.

A basic platform of worker's rights is safety at work.

If people choose to send their children into conditions where the workers are not safe, when they have the choice to do otherwise, it's akin to crossing a picket line. IMO.

 

Yes, over here in one of the earlier stages they are talking about opening up schools and daycares.  Kids tend to be the asymptomatic carriers.

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1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

Question:

If a city’s mayor extends a SAH order til June 1, then the governor extends a SAH order til May 20, which applies to the city?

I’m pretty sure the residents and businesses of that city have to follow the later date, but need some backup. 

In practice, that happened here already in CA. Local restrictions trumped state when it was stricter. Just like how state restrictions trumped federal when it was stricter. This also happened in other states as well. Florida comes to mind when local jurisdictions took action before the state did.



 

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8 minutes ago, calbear said:

In practice, that happened here already in CA. Local restrictions trumped state when it was stricter. Just like how state restrictions trumped federal when it was stricter. This also happened in other states as well. Florida comes to mind when local jurisdictions took action before the state did.



 

 

Thanks. I probably should refrain from wading into the fb discussion I am watching. 😆

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9 hours ago, Storygirl said:

Our public school district put out a message saying that teachers would still be grading and giving feedback on assignments. But that remote learning grades would not lower any student's GPA; they will base the course grade upon last quarter, if the student's grades drop. So students can improve their grades ( I think), but they won't be penalized if their grades get worse.

My kids could read this message on their Chromebooks, and maybe they did, but I did not bring it to their attention. I have one child who would decide that he didn't need to do any work any more, so I didn't want him to notice the policy. My other kids are doing fine grade-wise, so the policy doesn't impact them, anyway.

Now I can see that as a policy- but someone who was getting d;s or failing getting an A- that is ridiculous.  And it will end up hurting the better students when it comes to college admissions too since colleges will know about such awful policies and maybe discount those A's.

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Ozone therapy is working well in Italy. They are now using it in 17 hospitals.

It was not used initially but when they did a trial on 36 patients who were about to be intubated, 35 who were given ozone treatments improved. Only one needed to be intubated.

They used ozone autohemotherapy where they removed about 7/8 cup of blood into a sterilized glass container and then bubbled in ozone gas for about 10" or so. Then, the blood was injected back into the patient. They did this several times. 

Because ozone gas is so unstable, it breaks down quickly into oxygen but a small amount of ozone remains. Often it's a mixture of 95-98% oxygen and 5-2% ozone. Provided it's not breathed in, it's very safe. It's an old treatment that was used before antibiotics.

Here is a translated article from Italy's La Repubblica:

https://www.repubblica.it/salute/medicina-e-ricerca/2020/04/06/news/coronavirus_l_ozonoterapia_evita_la_terapia_intensiva-253290022/?refresh_ce

Coronavirus, ozone therapy avoids intensive therapy

By Luana de Francisco

April 6 2020

Experimentation in Udine: out of 36 patients with pneumonia and respiratory difficulties only one was intubated. Treatment, associated with antivirals, reduces lung damage and slows inflammation. Describes the Amato De Monte protocol, the Englaro case doctor.

The most effective clinical response could come from ozone therapy in patients who have contracted Covid-19 and struggle to avoid hospitalization in intensive care. Proof of this are the results obtained from the trial launched at the Udine hospital, where out of 36 patients with pneumonia and breathing difficulties, only one was intubated: the others have all improved and some have even been discharged from the hospital.

The development of the protocol and the request to AIFA

The intuition to take advantage of the ozone therapy against coronavirus bears the signature of the director of the Department of Anesthesia and Resuscitation of the "Central Friuli" University Health Authority, Amato De Monte. The same who, in 2009, accompanied Eluana Englaro, in a vegetative coma for 17 years, on the path of gradual suspension of nutrition and hydration. Together with the infectious disease specialist Carlo Tascini, who directs the infectious diseases clinic, and a team of colleagues, he has developed a protocol that could revolutionize the approach to treatment and which, not surprisingly, has already attracted the interest of specialists all over Italy. It is precisely from the data obtained so far that the request for authorization from the Italian Medicines Agency and the Ethics Committee of the Spallanzani Institute in Rome started to proceed with a study on 200 Covid-19 patients. In order to aim at its recognition from the methodological point of view at the level of the international scientific community.

How the procedure works

The treatment of patients with ozone therapy associated with antiviral drugs has therefore shown a slowing of inflammation and a reduction of lung damage. The procedure requires 200 milliliters of blood to be taken from the patient, allowed to interact with the ozone for about ten minutes and then re-injected. So three or four times at most. In other words, the infusion of ozone helps to strengthen the body's response in the fight against the effects of the infection in progress.

Ozone therapy, moreover, in the Friuli hospitals of Udine and Tolmezzo is by no means a novelty. And in Italy, among those who practice and teach it for some time, not surprisingly, there is De Monte. "To be exact, since 1996," explains the primary, who is also a teacher at the ozone therapy course organized at the University of Siena by Professor Emma Borrelli, a student of Professor Velio Bocci, the first to bring the practice to our country. "Before the coronavirus broke out - reports De Monte - a study had already been approved at the hospital in Udine to use it on patients with vascular problems in the lower limbs. I know that in other hospitals it is being used in ICU. We too had started from there, but wrongly, because we realized that at that point it was too late for the importance of the damage caused to the lungs. It is so - he continues - that, together with colleague Tascini, we decided to see how it worked if applied early, on patients who risked being intubated, because with impaired breathing and already in ventilation with a helmet or CPAP ".

Improvements in three sessions

The result is there for all to see. "After only three sessions - continues De Monte - we have seen sensational improvements, with a decisive reduction in the need for oxygen support". In short, it is difficult to imagine that, in the face of these findings, the same cannot be obtained even on a wider audience of patients. In any case, in the worst case scenario the therapy does not work: there are no side effects. At this point, therefore, the difference could be the time factor. "The hope is to get an answer as soon as possible - concludes De Monte - because the more immediate its use, the greater the help we will be able to give."

Edited by BeachGal
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7 hours ago, Dotwithaperiod said:

 This makes sense. Family member needs to be “vetted” as not ill somehow. The whole thing boils down to needing millions and millions of tests, antibody testing, etc. It’s the only way to get this in better control.  It seems the asymtomatic carriers are many and will never know without testing.

And what is even worse is that it really does appear that some of these asymptomatic and long term presymptomatic people are unknowing Typhoid Mary types = super- spreaders.  And no one has yet figured out why and no one has yet figured out why some people are asymptomatic or even totally do not get the disease even with close contact with others who have it.

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Ibiza is also using ozone autohemotherapy and getting good results.

https://theibizan.com/ozone-therapy-proving-successful-in-covid-19-patients/

The Nuestra Señora del Rosario Polyclinica in Ibiza is the first in Spain to use the Ozone technique in treating Covid-19 patients, with success.

In a press release the clinic said “Many patients who were about to be intubated and connected to mechanical ventilation have, thanks to ozone therapy, not only avoided it but improved to the point of not requiring oxygen with just a few treatment sessions.” 

The clinic also stated that they are seeing improvements in patients after just ‘2 or 3 treatment sessions’. Ozone therapy has the benefit of improving oxygenation at the tissue level and therefore reduces the inflammatory response suffered by patients.

Italy and China Trial Ozone

At the Santa María della Misericordia University Hospital in Udine, Italy, 36 patients with Covid-19 pneumonia who had respiratory failure were administered Ozone therapy. Only 3% required intubation compared to the usual 15%. There is a high mortality of intubated patients and given a fifth were spared intubation; it is an achievement to highlight. There are also four clinical trials underway in China and the provisional results could not be more hopeful.

Nuestra Señora del Rosario Polyclinic

“In Spain, only we have begun to administer it with the mandatory authorisation of the Quality Committee of the hospital centre, and the results have been spectacular,” says Dr. Alberto Hernández, Assistant Physician for Anaesthesia and Resuscitation at the Nuestra Señora del Rosario Polyclinic in Ibiza. “We have registered a clinical trial, but we need to tell the world that Ozone is a very effective and beneficial therapy in these patients and that we must immediately incorporate it into the treatment of these patients.”

Dr. José Baeza, President of the Spanish Society of Ozone Therapy and Vice President of the World Federation of Ozone Therapy, states that “given the absence of an effective treatment or a vaccine and in the context of the current health emergency ” All hospitalised patients should receive Ozone therapy as the clear benefit is evident, and Ozone therapy has no significant side effects.”

Approval

On April 4, the therapy was authorised for it’s first use at the Polyclinic. After presenting the potential benefits of Ozone therapy at a medical scientific session, the centre’s group of experts in Covid-19 infection: Drs Montserrat Viñals and Asunción Pablos, from the Internal Medicine service, Dr. Adriana Martín from the Service of Intensive Medicine, and Dr. María Victoria Velasco from the Emergency Service of the Nuestra Señora del Rosario Polyclinica in Ibiza, gave their approval to the protocol for the administration of Ozone in patients with Covid-19 presented by Dr. Alberto Hernández.

The First Patient

A 49-year-old man who had already required ICU admission was deteriorating on the ward. He had deteriorated to the point that he required oxygen at the highest concentration and yet it was oxygenating his lungs poorly. Intubation and connection to a ventilator was planned, but surprisingly, after the first session of Ozone therapy, the improvement was significant and oxygen requirements could be decreased.

Dr. Alberto Hernández explained that “the improvement after the first session of Ozone treatment was spectacular. We were surprised, his respiratory rate normalised, his oxygen levels increased, and we were able to stop supplying him with as much oxygen since the patient was able to oxygenate himself. To our surprise, when we carried out an analytical control, we observed how Ferritin, an analysis determination that is being used as a prognostic marker in this disease, not only had not followed the upward trend, but had decreased significantly; that decline continued in the following days. This result encouraged us to administer it to other patients who are following the same improvement as our first patient. “

We Will Help Other Hospitals

Dr. Hernández said “Let no one hesitate to contact us in order to establish the appropriate circuits and structure to be able to incorporate Ozone therapy as soon as possible in the different hospital centres that wish to do so.”

From the Polyclinic Group, Francisco Vilás, its CEO, pointed out that “we will be happy to contribute and help any hospital that asks us for help, in such exceptional circumstances as those we are experiencing that we can contribute to help in this unfortunate pandemic. Full of pride, we will make our human and technical resources and our experience with Ozone therapy available to those who request it.”

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10 minutes ago, calbear said:

White House announces 3 phase plan. Every state will have power over when their state begins to move through the process.

https://apnews.com/420a38ec14101eab70e07be367ee6422

This article makes it seem like the President is doing this.  It is the CDC's recommendations and there are specific health guidelines that need to be met in order to get to each stage.  As of today-- only three states could start level 1.https://www.npr.org/2020/04/16/833451041/watch-white-house-to-share-coronavirus-guidelines-on-a-path-to-reopening-the-cou

This article describes what are the criterias for getting to each level and also what each level means except it does leave out the medical procedures, etc resumption schedule that I heard Dr. Birx talking about at the White House briefing.

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2 hours ago, Seasider too said:

Question:

If a city’s mayor extends a SAH order til June 1, then the governor extends a SAH order til May 20, which applies to the city?

I’m pretty sure the residents and businesses of that city have to follow the later date, but need some backup. 

 

I would assume the later date—but would seek clarification from local powers that be. 

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🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 @Laura Corin

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-scotland-52294799/engineering-enthusiasts-3d-print-thousands-of-face-shields
“Groups and companies across Scotland are helping to provide personal protective equipment (PPE) to the NHS.

Among them is Edinburgh Shield Force, a club of engineering enthusiasts, who are 3D printing face shields for Scottish hospitals.

BBC Scotland's The Nine spoke to some of the volunteers who have already delivered thousands of visors.”

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2 hours ago, Seasider too said:

Question:

If a city’s mayor extends a SAH order til June 1, then the governor extends a SAH order til May 20, which applies to the city?

I’m pretty sure the residents and businesses of that city have to follow the later date, but need some backup. 

June 1st to the city, which means other cities in the same state might end SAH on May 20th. 
 

Also the SAH orders may have different restrictions. Santa Cruz county which is not a hotspot is loosening their Shelter in Place restrictions for its residents. My county is a hotspot and has ban using our own reusable bag when buying things, among other restrictions.

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@mathnerd@sassenach

https://abc7news.com/food/bay-area-produce-shortage-after-safeway-employee-dies-from-covid-19-complications/6109205/

“TRACY, Calif. (KGO) -- Bay Area residents are seeing a shortage in produce items at grocery stores, mostly at Safeway locations.

This comes the same week the grocery chain confirmed an employee at a distribution center in Tracy passed away from COVID-19.

Wendy Gutshall, Director of Public and Government Affairs for Safeway released this statement:


"Like many of our neighbors in Northern California, COVID-19 has touched our own Safeway family with confirmed diagnoses among our associates. We were saddened to learn that an associate at our Tracy Distribution Center has passed away due to complications related to COVID-19. Our hearts are heavy, and our thoughts are with that associate's family."

The statement also goes on to say "3% of our approximately 1,700 associates at the Tracy Distribution Center have tested positive for COVID-19."

Gutshall also released this statement to ABC7 News regarding why customers are seeing a produce shortage:
"The Produce Warehouse in the Tracy Distribution Center is running short on staff for a variety of reasons and requires us to streamline operations with the remaining team to ensure that our stores are still able to be supplied with the necessary order for our customers. The distribution center will run on the streamline operations structure for the time being, as they continue to secure additional resources."”

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Our daughter's college is in this county (although she is home now). I like the proactive data collecting they are doing:

"Johnson County has launched its $400,000 program expanding community testing in order to better collect data on the outbreak of COVID-19. The county is inviting hundreds of randomly selected residents, who are supposed to be representative of the population, to be tested at a drive-thru location.

"Meanwhile, Johnson County has also collected data about the coronavirus outbreak through an online survey, which was available last week. Areola said more than 72,000 people responded, with about 1.5% reporting that they might have symptoms.

"In addition to testing randomly selected residents, this week the county is starting to expand testing for nursing home staff and clients, as well as front-line workers, such as grocery store employees, delivery drivers and first responders."

Full article: https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/article242010356.html

 
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It is interesting to me that many of the treatments being considered have been around for a long time.

Plasma since 1934.

https://www.history.com/news/blood-plasma-covid-19-measles-spanish-flu

Hydroxy chloroquine, 1950's, is a safer version based on the older chloroquine (1934).

https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2020/03/20/chloroquine-past-and-present

Ozone therapy has been around for 150 years, Tesla was involved! 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3312702/

Ivermectin was first used in 1981, the story of its discovery is interesting.

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/ivermectin-mectizan.html

And, grandmas have been pushing vitamin D in its cod liver oil form forever.

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13 hours ago, Storygirl said:

The nursing home called my dad when they had a staff member test positive. They called him back yesterday with the results for my mom (negative). Our state has also added a chart online that lists how many cases are in every nursing home that has cases, so I was able to look it up and see that my mom's place has four cases.

I am not a primary contact for the nursing home, so the news comes through my dad. He is not, unfortunately, the best at communicating, so I get some of my information from my sister, who gets it from Dad or sometimes hears from the nursing home staff herself (she is the second contact person, since she lives in my hometown, and I do not).

Our state is now requiring nursing facilities to contact families if there is a positive case, but that is a new guideline. Our Governor stated that he made this decision based not on privacy laws, but on what he thinks is decent and what he would want if he had family in a nursing home. But they did have to run it by the lawyers, I think, so it took a few days to go into effect.

Quoting myself in order to update. My response above was to indicate how I learned the information, and I learned more information just now. This time, it was by reading an online story in the local paper, which states that the information published on the state website was outdated by the time it was put up. There are 8 cases at my mom's nursing home, not just four. There are 35 residents (a specific fact I did not know), and 4 are positive, with 4 staff positive. They have set up a special wing for the positive people, and the same staff will always work with them. A concerning fact is that 3 of the 4 residents have shown no symptoms yet, which indicates how hard it is to detect and prevent the spread.

My dad and siblings will no doubt read this in the paper, too. I don't know how much of this was shared with my dad on the phone, but I suspect that there is more info in the paper than he was told (he tends to not ask questions).

My mom lives in the skilled nursing section, but there are many more residents at that facility in assisted living quarters and in independent houses on the grounds. It sounds like they have only tested those in skilled nursing so far. The families of those in skilled nursing were notified by phone, but I don't know if they also shared the information with the people in the other sections of the facility. Maybe? Since the nursing home was closed to the public, the residents of the other sections have not been allowed in to the nursing home part, so hopefully it has been contained to the one building.

In this case, it seems that the virus was accidentally brought into the facility by a staff member.

 

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2 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Bno: Wuhan, where the coronavirus pandemic began, revises death toll to 3,869, an increase of 50%

Given the size of the city and what we know now about how long they let it spread before lockdown, it seems like an increase of 1000% would be more realistic.

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