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South Korea reported on Friday that 91 recovered coronavirus patients have tested positive for the disease again, raising questions over health experts' understanding of the pandemic.Recovered coronavirus patients test positive again in blow to immunity hopes

They believe that the virus has re-activated in these people. Some have symptoms. 

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30 minutes ago, MissLemon said:

Now that I think about it, my husband's uncle has shingles, too.  We saw him (from a distance) 10 days ago, when he came by to pick up eggs.  🤨 Hmmm...

Stress can be a factor in shingles as well.  Shingles isn’t just a weird rash.

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Shingles isn’t contagious to people who’ve already had chicken pox. I decided my rash was unlikely to be shingles because I had no fever or other ill feelings and it was not one sided. 
 

This is hard because the virus supposedly has all kinds of possible symptoms or none, you’re wildly contagious, and supposed to quarantine yourself if you have it, you want to be a responsible person, but you don’t want to be a hypochondriac and calling off work unnecessarily. 

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10 hours ago, Pen said:

CV19 seems to be currently eradicated from Greenland.

11 confirmed cases have all recovered. With travel bans in place, they have reported no new cases in last few days...  2 weeks or so should show if any more cases emerge from contact with asymptomatic carriers.

   I hope to see NZ as the next place with similar situation. 

Meanwhile in Australia

https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-12/coronavirus-curve-flattens-but-new-questions-worry-australians/12140962?pfmredir=sm

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2 hours ago, MissLemon said:

Now that I think about it, my husband's uncle has shingles, too.  We saw him (from a distance) 10 days ago, when he came by to pick up eggs.  🤨 Hmmm...

My dad has shingles right now.

i think it definitely is that because he’s had it a couple of times 

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1 minute ago, Ausmumof3 said:

My dad has shingles right now.

i think it definitely is that because he’s had it a couple of times 

I hope so. Do you know if having shingles right now would make one more susceptible to COVID-19?  

My uncle-in-law had been at Walmart and I was like "Augh, you need to stay hooooome, why are you going to Walmart of all places?!" We had a person in my town that was waiting for test results and went to Walmart anyway. The test was positive and there's some debate about whether or not they knew this before they went out. 

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2 hours ago, Mom2mthj said:

Stress can be a factor in shingles as well.  Shingles isn’t just a weird rash.

 

I know a bunch of people who had since CV19 outbreak or now are with shingles or suspected shingles (not wanting to go to medical establishments currently so having to guess),  and assumed it was shingles and due to high stress.  But I guess maybe it could be a dermatological form of CV19.  The cases I currently know of and recently knew of maybe-shingles seem to have responded/ be responding reasonably well to lysine/vitamin C . 

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3 hours ago, Acadie said:

Oh my.

Dd17 has what we thought was foot fungus on both feet, but it's not responding to Lamisil or Lotrimin. Now I'm thinking could be COVID-related chilblains. She first noticed it 10 days ago, on April 1. Video below shows two types of potentially COVID-related rashes dermatologists are seeing. Similar rashes can be caused by many other things, it's just that they're seeing this in around 20% of COVID-19 patients. 

https://www.popsugar.com/beauty/coronavirus-skin-rashes-symptom-47384587

Holy smokes! Need to figure out what this means for our household. I doubt she can get tested in my state because she has no other Covid symptoms. The video notes chilblains are often seen in younger patients with no other symptoms. But I'll be in touch with our ped. 

Dh has asthma so we've taken social distancing very seriously and have been really careful. On the other hand, we've all had some weird minor symptoms which have puzzled me since everyone's been out of work and school for a month....

Interesting. Mine was the livedoid pattern. It didn’t really bother me so I didn’t think too much about it. And I only had it a couple of days towards the end. 

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😡https://time.com/5819588/nurses-slashed-tires-new-york/

“As medical workers left New York Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital in Cortlandt, N.Y., early Friday morning they found that tires on 22 cars in the parking lot had been slashed, officials said.

In a press release circulated Friday, New York State Police said it had arrested Daniel R. Hall, 29, for the incident. The police said Hall also allegedly had a small amount of PCP on him. Hall’s attorney could not be immediately located for comment.

“We were shocked to hear of this incident, especially at this time when our employees are working tirelessly and courageously through this crisis,” NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital told TIME in a statement. The hospital told TIME it would pay for the damages.

Hall was arraigned and given sent to the Westchester County Jail in lieu of $1,500 cash bail. He’s scheduled to appear before Peekskill Court on May 18. The police did not immediately respond to TIME’s request for comment.”

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Hundreds of thousands of the Abbott Labs rapid tests are sitting idle:

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-04-09/abbott-tests-to-detect-covid-19-are-falling-short

If they were being used as quickly as they are being produced (50,000/day), we would be seeing a bump in testing. Testing has basically been flat for the last week (give it take a bit).

Sweden's new case numbers & death numbers are down. Anyone have insight on that?

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Looking for your opinion, since so many of you have been looking at charts and models for months now. Is it just too soon to get our hopes up that all the public health measures (everything, including schools, restaurants, non-grocery stores, shut down since March 16) are working?

6F1D8652-365B-4972-BDF2-363A549F4BDE.jpeg.d77a6bfd49b4cc3d2d7d4cba720378b1.jpeg
 

ETA: 18,448 tests performed 

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44 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

Hundreds of thousands of the Abbott Labs rapid tests are sitting idle:

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-04-09/abbott-tests-to-detect-covid-19-are-falling-short

If they were being used as quickly as they are being produced (50,000/day), we would be seeing a bump in testing. Testing has basically been flat for the last week (give it take a bit).

Our state had announced it had them, but was still getting them distributed within the state . 

It isn’t clear that testing guidelines have changed.  

It might actually be a good idea to work with epidemiologists to make the best use they can figure out for the tests it can do. 

Like can it help with figuring out a rational way into the Dance phase of Hammer and Dance even with somewhat wider but still limited testing?  I don’t think they have that figured out yes and don’t want to blow the tests they got  

44 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

Sweden's new case numbers & death numbers are down. Anyone have insight on that?

 

I heard that many in Sweden felt the keep doing things as usual experiment wasn’t working and started clamoring for required Physical Distancing plus doing it. 

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My daughter is at her house,  She was negative on whatever COVID19 test they did but the doctor didn't rule it out.  He gave her several prescriptions.  She was sick earlier before our stay at home stuff started and was quarantined for 14 days.  I am not sure if she is quarantined again.  

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46 minutes ago, arctic_bunny said:

Looking for your opinion, since so many of you have been looking at charts and models for months now. Is it just too soon to get our hopes up that all the public health measures (everything, including schools, restaurants, non-grocery stores, shut down since March 16) are working?

6F1D8652-365B-4972-BDF2-363A549F4BDE.jpeg.d77a6bfd49b4cc3d2d7d4cba720378b1.jpeg
 

ETA: 18,448 tests performed 

 

I think They are working as the doubling rate you highlighted shows. 

Id also look for a trailing improvement in other statistics like new cases per day figures to start dropping next 

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13 minutes ago, kdsuomi said:

 

No, now is when you would be seeing that the measures are working. It doesn't mean it's time to stop the measures, though. 

No, definitely not. And the government has no plans to stop. School is out until September no matter what, everything else has been cancelled. Camping reservations are closed for the summer. We just have to keep doing what we’re doing, fingers crossed!

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😢https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/pandemic-spells-death-sentence-for-india-s-non-virus-patients-12634956
“Pandemic spells death sentence for India's non-virus patients

NEW DELHI: Liver patient Shahjahan's family feared the worst when a New Delhi public hospital told her to leave because her bed was needed in a coronavirus unit.

The 40-year-old mother had been on a ventilator with an acute infection for almost two weeks when she left Lok Nayak hospital on Tuesday night (Apr 7).

She died at her family home in Delhi the next morning. Other hospitals had turned her away because of the pandemic.

"The authorities just left her to die. Even when they referred us to another hospital, they refused to give us an ambulance," said Mohammad Khalid, a relative of Shahjahan.

The capacity of medical facilities around the world has been stretched by the surge of COVID-19 patients as outbreaks worsen in many countries.

It can cause people with other life-threatening diseases to miss out on vital care - especially in places like India, where healthcare systems are shakier.

Dozens of people with serious medical conditions are camped outside India's national medical institute in tents set up by the Delhi government.

Many of them had travelled from other cities for now-cancelled appointments and cannot go back due to transport restrictions under the nationwide lockdown that began on March 25.

Outpatient departments at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) closed, forcing cancer patients and others with deadly ailments to take shelter in a grimy pedestrian subway and under canvas.

Though aid groups have provided some food and medicine, it had been 12 hours since Saryu Das had eaten when AFP met him.

SUBWAY DEATH

His son, who had mouth cancer, lay on a thin mattress with his face covered by a scarf. Flies hovered around him. Four days later, he died.

Waste littered the subway floor that is now home to more than 10 families unable to get back to their hometowns, with the mattresses so close that social distancing was impossible.

The AIIMS did not immediately respond to requests for comment on the death and the patients outside. But hospitals across the vast country of 1.3 billion people have been put on alert and its virus death toll is now above 280.

When Prime Minister Narendra Modi announced the lockdown, he gave millions of Indians taking life-saving drugs only four hours' notice.

Amulya Nidhi, a health activist based in Madhya Pradesh state, told AFP the government knew that vulnerable patients - including those with silicosis and tuberculosis, which kills tens of thousands each year in India, as well as pregnant women - were at risk.

"I'm getting distress calls from across India over access to basic medicines and treatment," said Nidhi.”

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Tasmania’s Premier closes hospitals

ABC News: Matt Wordsworth

Peter Gutwein has announced the North West Regional Hospital and North West Private Hospital in Burnie will close because of the coronavirus outbreak.

      

All staff and their households will go into quarantine.

     

That’ll involve more than 1,000 people.

     

Of the 133 cases in Tasmania, 61 linked to the north-west coast, 35 are health care workers at the hospitals.

 

Staff and their household members will be required to quarantine for 14 days, from their last shift.

     

The hospitals will be closed for a deep clean.

     

There will also be broader restrictions on the north-west community.

   

"We’re sorry that we've needed to do this but at the end of the day we need to get on top of this," Mr Gutwein said.

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Israel is up to 10,878 cases, 103 deaths.  We have been on partial lockdown for 4 weeks and complete lockdown for 2.5 weeks.  The growth in new cases is slowing gradually but also steadily.  Clearly we are going to be at this for a while.

Israel has a young population -- median age 30 -- and I think that is really saving the country's (non-kosher) bacon, deaths-wise.  And the ultra-Orthodox areas that have been by far the hardest hit have an even younger median age; in some cities half the population is under the age of 18.

There are a lot of plans for reopening the country circulating around, some of them straight-up bananas.  Let's divide the country into two groups, and each one goes out on alternating weeks!  Or everyone goes out for two days, then we're all locked down for 10!  

It's all very messy and chaotic (Israel) but It looks like ultimately the country is going to wind up with (1) expanded testing, if they can manage it, (2) geographically-based restrictions; and (3) a super-gradual resumption of economic activity, spread out over many months.  So far the economic fallout is being dealt with primarily through the unemployment system, but obviously there will have to be much more intervention.  No idea what the plan is for the tourism sector and El Al, which are just obliterated.

I have been wondering how other countries are dealing with infections among military personnel, though?  Soldiers have been infected here and while they are all young obviously it's a huge potential threat to military readiness.  Controlling the spread in the IDF has been a major priority.

 

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7 hours ago, Pen said:

The difference between the Swedish approach and the Danish approach is vast.

Denmark is reopening K through 5 schools next week with some new protective measures in place, one of which is the instruction to keep the kids outside as much as possible.

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@TCB@Plumhttps://www.latimes.com/science/story/2020-04-05/viagra-discovery-could-treat-coronavirus-patients
 

“At hospitals in Boston, Alabama, Louisiana, Sweden and Austria, researchers have launched a clinical trial to test inhaled nitric oxide in patients with mild to moderate cases of COVID-19. The trial will test whether the gas can drive down the number of patients who end up needing breathing assistance from a mechanical ventilator, a piece of equipment that’s in critically short supply. 

For about 30 minutes two or three times a day, study participants assigned to the trial’s active arm will inhale a high dose of nitric oxide through a mask. A control group will go without the gas.

In Italy, where the gas was used under more haphazard conditions, the treatment appeared to dramatically boost oxygen levels in the blood of COVID-19 patients, said Dr. Lorenzo Berra, the critical-care specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital who is leading the new trial. But it’ll take more rigorous testing to clarify how much nitric oxide helps, he said. 

A proposed second trial, still under scrutiny by a research panel at Massachusetts General Hospital, would enroll healthcare workers who are routinely exposed to patients with COVID-19 and are themselves at high risk of infection. For 10 to 15 minutes at the start and end of every shift, doctors and nurses would tug on a handheld device and inhale a high dose of nitric oxide.”

 

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1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

@TCB@Plumhttps://www.latimes.com/science/story/2020-04-05/viagra-discovery-could-treat-coronavirus-patients
 

“At hospitals in Boston, Alabama, Louisiana, Sweden and Austria, researchers have launched a clinical trial to test inhaled nitric oxide in patients with mild to moderate cases of COVID-19. The trial will test whether the gas can drive down the number of patients who end up needing breathing assistance from a mechanical ventilator, a piece of equipment that’s in critically short supply. 

For about 30 minutes two or three times a day, study participants assigned to the trial’s active arm will inhale a high dose of nitric oxide through a mask. A control group will go without the gas.

In Italy, where the gas was used under more haphazard conditions, the treatment appeared to dramatically boost oxygen levels in the blood of COVID-19 patients, said Dr. Lorenzo Berra, the critical-care specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital who is leading the new trial. But it’ll take more rigorous testing to clarify how much nitric oxide helps, he said. 

A proposed second trial, still under scrutiny by a research panel at Massachusetts General Hospital, would enroll healthcare workers who are routinely exposed to patients with COVID-19 and are themselves at high risk of infection. For 10 to 15 minutes at the start and end of every shift, doctors and nurses would tug on a handheld device and inhale a high dose of nitric oxide.”

 

 

👍

This sounds remarkably promising!!!

 

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58 minutes ago, whitehawk said:

DS did have a rash on the back of one hand, inexplicably, for a couple of days when he had cold symptoms. Interesting.

 

It is fairly common to get a rash as a result of a virus. When I did a telephone triage job for a while I spoke to many people for whom this seemed to be the probable origin of their rash. 

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The PM of Sint Maarten: "Simply. Stop. Moving. If you don't have the type of bread you like in your house, eat crackers! If you don't have crackers, eat cereal!"

This is the kind of leadership we need — a mom who has had ENOUGH and is like "don't make me count to 3...!" 😂

 

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1 hour ago, Corraleno said:

The PM of Sint Maarten: "Simply. Stop. Moving. If you don't have the type of bread you like in your house, eat crackers! If you don't have crackers, eat cereal!"

This is the kind of leadership we need — a mom who has had ENOUGH and is like "don't make me count to 3...!" 😂

 

 

Gave me goosebumps and tears.  Amazing, rallying, no-nonsense speech!  

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1 hour ago, Corraleno said:

The PM of Sint Maarten: "Simply. Stop. Moving. If you don't have the type of bread you like in your house, eat crackers! If you don't have crackers, eat cereal!"

This is the kind of leadership we need — a mom who has had ENOUGH and is like "don't make me count to 3...!" 😂

 

 

Would love to see that on some of the other threads too (endgame,  one’s about people getting antsy...) 

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A little late, but re shingles, one way to tell it apart from other rashes is that shingles follows along nerve paths (dermatomes), instead of being diffuse.

The back is a common location. You can see how the rash is following along a nerve path, which is why shingles is so painful.

https://www.nhsdirect.wales.nhs.uk/shingles?locale=en 

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Not sure how I feel about this. My county. Long article  snipped

University Medical Center on Tuesday began prescribing hydroxychloroquine to high-risk emergency room patients who test positive for COVID-19 but do not require immediate hospitalization.

In doing so, UMC became the first Las Vegas-area hospital to dispense it on an outpatient basis, taking a cutting-edge position nationally in the use of the controversial experimental drug.

“Our outcomes in our ICU patients to date are better than outcomes we’re seeing from Italy, China, France and other countries,” Zyniewicz noted. “Is it a result of the medication and the other antivirals we’re putting them on? Probably.”

Across the country, he said, high-risk patients have been leaving emergency rooms and then returning four or five days later, only to require hospitalization and use of a ventilator to help them breathe.

“We were working day and night to determine if there was any therapy we could try, and this was our best resource at this time,” said Zyniewicz, a vice president with US Acute Care Solutions, a physicians group that serves more than 200 hospitals and facilities across the country.

“The patients we’re looking at first and foremost have diabetes, which is a disease that has been associated with a much worse outcome with COVID-19,” Zyniewicz said. “Now we feel very good we’re at least giving them a fighting chance to not be on a ventilator.”

Other area hospitals said they are currently using the drug only for hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Dr. Christopher Voscopoulos, medical director of the Southern Hills Hospital and Medical Center’s intensive care unit, said he has prescribed the drug to patients severely ill with COVID-19.

“When the risk of death outweighs the risk of the drug, then it is appropriate to try the drug,” he said.

From his perspective, it’s too soon to say whether the drug is benefiting patients. As for using the drug on an outpatient basis, he said he did not believe an experimental drug should be taken outside a hospital setting.

For hospitalized patients, Voscopoulos has been more enthusiastic about the early use of “proning,” or placing COVID-19 patients on their stomachs to improve lung function.

Proning is also being practiced at UMC, Zyniewicz said, along with prescribing anti-viral medications.

“Which part of our intervention was the most important? … At the end of the day, which one is the most important? We won’t know for a while,” he said.

But in a pandemic, when all drugs that could possibly benefit patients still need to be thoroughly studied, success is measured by how many people hospitals are able to get off of ventilators, he said.

“I fully expect that this therapy that we’re delivering will expand in Las Vegas and across the country pretty quickly as the production of this medication is ramped up,” Zyniewicz said, noting that UMC is the first hospital under his organization’s umbrella delivering the outpatient therapy.

In New York, a pandemic hot spot, clinical trials are evaluating the use of the drugs in patients who aren’t hospitalized.
 

The HealthCare Partners guidance notes that hydroxychlorquine has been used on critically ill, hospitalized patients “with some success in small numbers of patients.”

But it also notes that, among other things, the drug can disrupt heart rhythms and damage the liver.

“Using hydroxychloroquine in mild or moderate outpatient cases of COVID-19 or prophylactically for healthy people has not been recommended by any organization,” the guidance states. “HealthCare Partners Nevada medical leadership does not support the outpatient use of hydroxychloroquine at this time.”

Zyniewicz said that before giving the drug on an outpatient basis, UMC conducts electrocardiograms, liver function tests and comprehensive metabolic panels.

Doctors are engaging in “shared decision making” with patients and discussing possible side effects. “But I think the drug is quite safe, perhaps safer than a lot of other drugs we use,” he said.

“The drug has been around for 60 years … and it’s still widely used to prevent malaria,” Zyniewicz said. “I don’t know of anybody that’s going on safari that cancels their trip because they’re worried about cardiac side effects.”
 

https://www.reviewjournal.com/life/health/las-vegas-hospital-blazes-own-path-with-malaria-drug-to-treat-covid-2005095/?g2i_source=newsletter&g2i_campaign=Coronavirus Update&utm_email=E4982545544CA455752434B823&utm_source=listrak&utm_medium=Coronavirus&utm_term=Las Vegas hospital blazes own path with malaria drug to treat COVID - title&utm_campaign=Coronavirus Update

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China has imposed restrictions on the publication of academic research on the origins of the novel coronavirus, according to a central government directive and online notices published by two Chinese universities, that have since been removed from the web.

Under the new policy, all academic papers on COVID-19 will be subject to extra vetting before being submitted for publication.

Studies on the origin of the virus will receive extra scrutiny and must be approved by central government officials, according to the now-deleted posts.

A medical expert in Hong Kong who collaborated with mainland researchers to publish a clinical analysis of COVID-19 cases in an international medical journal said his work did not undergo such vetting in February.

The increased scrutiny appears to be the latest effort by the Chinese government to control the narrative on the origins of the coronavirus pandemic, which has claimed more than 100,000 lives and sickened 1.7 million people worldwide since it first broke out in the Chinese city of Wuhan in December.

Since late January, Chinese researchers have published a series of COVID-19 studies in influential international medical journals.

Some findings about early coronavirus cases - such as when human-to-human transition first appeared - have raised questions over the official government account of the outbreak and sparked controversy on Chinese social media.

And now, Chinese authorities appear to be tightening their grip on the publication of COVID-19 research.

Chinese President Xi Jinping visits the Chuanshan port area of the Ningbo-Zhoushan Port in east China's Zhejiang Province. Credit: Ju Peng/AP

A Chinese researcher who spoke on condition of anonymity due to fear of retaliation said the move was a worrying development that would likely obstruct important scientific research.

“I think it is a coordinated effort from (the) Chinese government to control (the) narrative, and paint it as if the outbreak did not originate in China,” the researcher told CNN.

“And I don’t think they will really tolerate any objective study to investigate the origination of this disease.”

CNN has reached out to China’s foreign ministry for comment.

Increased scrutiny

According to the directive issued by the Ministry of Education’s science and technology department, “academic papers about tracing the origin of the virus must be strictly and tightly managed.”

The directive lays out layers of approval for these papers, starting with the academic committees at universities.

They are then required to be sent to the education ministry’s science and technology department, which then forwards the papers to a task-force under the State Council for vetting.

Only after the universities hear back from the task-force can the papers be submitted to journals.

Other papers on COVID-19 will be vetted by universities’ academic committees, based on conditions such as the “academic value” of the study, and whether the “timing for publishing” is right.

Medical workers from China’s Jilin Province react as they prepare to return home after Wuhan’s 11-week lockdown. Credit: Ng Han Guan/AP

The directive is based on instructions issued during a March 25 meeting held by the State Council’s task-force on the prevention and control of COVID-19, it said.

The document was first posted Friday morning on the website of the Fudan University in Shanghai, one of China’s leading universities.

When CNN called a contact number left at the end of the notice, a staff member of the education ministry’s science and technology department confirmed they had issued the directive.

“It is not supposed to be made public - it is an internal document,” said the person, who refused to reveal his name.

A few hours later, the Fudan University page was taken down.

The China University of Geoscience in Wuhan also posted a similar notice about the extra vetting on COVID-19 papers on its website.

The page has since been deleted, but a cached version of it remains accessible.

Additional checks

The Chinese researcher who spoke to CNN said the notice was issued a few days ago, adding that only COVID-19 research was subject to the additional checks.

David Hui Shu-cheong, a respiratory medicine expert at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, said he did not encounter any additional vetting when he and a team of mainland Chinese researchers published a clinical analysis of COVID-19 cases in the New England Journal of Medicine in February.

“The process was really simple then,” he told CNN over the phone.

Hui said he was still revising the draft of the paper until 3 am on the day it was due for submission, and the paper was sent to the NEJM by midday.

“There was completely no restriction at all,” he said.

“I don’t know if it is because some researchers published something that is considered sensitive domestically in China. (I’m) not sure if it is because of the controversy about the origin of the virus later, and the non-sensitive stuff becomes sensitive too.”

Origin of the virus

In late December, Wuhan reported the first cases of the coronavirus, linked by authorities to a seafood market in the city.

Scientists in China and the West have said the virus is likely to have originated in bats and jumped to humans from an intermediate host - just like its cousin that caused the SARS epidemic in 2002 and 2003.

However, parts of Chinese social media and even the country’s government appear to have launched a concerted campaign to question the origin of the virus.

Chinese officials and state media have repeatedly stressed that there has been no conclusion on the exact origin of the virus.

Last month, Zhao Lijian, a spokesperson of the Chinese Foreign Ministry, promoted a conspiracy on Twitter that the virus had originated in the US and was brought to China by the US military.

In China, research papers on the coronavirus are already subjected to layers of vetting after they are submitted to Chinese academic journals, according to an editor at a Chinese medical journal.

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On 4/11/2020 at 6:16 AM, TravelingChris said:

I really, really hope it is a dead virus vaccine because otherwise,  myself and a lot of other high risk people will not be able to get the vaccine.

 

Vaccine development has changed quite a bit in the past decade or so. Using inactivated or weakened viruses is considered an old approach. According to what I’ve been reading, it will very likely (almost certainly) not be used for the Covid vaccine. 

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@mathnerd@TCB@wathe@Alice@BeachGal@TravelingChris

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2020/03/covid-19-can-coexist-with-other-respiratory-viruses.html

COVID-19 patients often infected with other respiratory viruses, preliminary study reports

About 1 in 5 people with COVID-19 are also infected with other respiratory viruses, according to a preliminary analysis led by Ian Brown, MD, a clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine.

In addition, the analysis found that about 1 in 10 people who exhibit symptoms of respiratory illness at an emergency department, and who are subsequently diagnosed with a common respiratory virus, are co-infected with the COVID-19 virus.

The findings challenge the assumption that people are unlikely to have COVID-19 if they have another type of viral respiratory disease.

“Currently, if a patient tests positive for a different respiratory virus, we believe that they don’t have COVID-19,” said Nigam Shah, MBBS, PhD, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science at the medical school. “However, given the co-infection rates we’ve observed in this sample, that is an incorrect assumption.”

Accurate and rapid testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is necessary to identify those who are infected and slow the spread of the disease. Understanding the likelihood of co-infection is an important step in this process. 

“Hospitals don’t have unlimited access to COVID testing,” Brown said. “In some cases, a patient with respiratory symptoms may first be tested for a non-COVID virus. If there is a diagnosis of influenza or rhinovirus, or other respiratory virus, a hospital may discharge the patient without COVID testing, concluding that the alternative diagnosis is the reason for the symptoms.”

Brown and his colleagues analyzed 562 people recently tested for COVID-19 at Stanford Health Care’s Marc and Laura Andreessen Emergency Department. Forty-nine of those people tested positive for infection with SARS-CoV-2.

Of the 562 people, 517 were also tested for the presence of other common respiratory viruses, such as influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, adenovirus and several types of pneumonia. One hundred and twenty seven received a positive result for one of these other respiratory viruses. 

Of the people tested for both SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses, eleven people — or about 22% of the 49 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 8.7% of the 127 people with other respiratory viruses — were found to be co-infected with both kinds of viruses.

The researchers shared their findings March 18 on Medium.com, an online publishing platform, at the request of the California Department of Public Health.”

findings Medium link https://medium.com/@nigam/higher-co-infection-rates-in-covid19-b24965088333

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27 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

@mathnerd@TCB@wathe@Alice@BeachGal@TravelingChris

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2020/03/covid-19-can-coexist-with-other-respiratory-viruses.html

COVID-19 patients often infected with other respiratory viruses, preliminary study reports

About 1 in 5 people with COVID-19 are also infected with other respiratory viruses, according to a preliminary analysis led by Ian Brown, MD, a clinical associate professor of emergency medicine at the Stanford School of Medicine.

In addition, the analysis found that about 1 in 10 people who exhibit symptoms of respiratory illness at an emergency department, and who are subsequently diagnosed with a common respiratory virus, are co-infected with the COVID-19 virus.

The findings challenge the assumption that people are unlikely to have COVID-19 if they have another type of viral respiratory disease.

“Currently, if a patient tests positive for a different respiratory virus, we believe that they don’t have COVID-19,” said Nigam Shah, MBBS, PhD, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science at the medical school. “However, given the co-infection rates we’ve observed in this sample, that is an incorrect assumption.”

Accurate and rapid testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is necessary to identify those who are infected and slow the spread of the disease. Understanding the likelihood of co-infection is an important step in this process. 

“Hospitals don’t have unlimited access to COVID testing,” Brown said. “In some cases, a patient with respiratory symptoms may first be tested for a non-COVID virus. If there is a diagnosis of influenza or rhinovirus, or other respiratory virus, a hospital may discharge the patient without COVID testing, concluding that the alternative diagnosis is the reason for the symptoms.”

Brown and his colleagues analyzed 562 people recently tested for COVID-19 at Stanford Health Care’s Marc and Laura Andreessen Emergency Department. Forty-nine of those people tested positive for infection with SARS-CoV-2.

Of the 562 people, 517 were also tested for the presence of other common respiratory viruses, such as influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus, adenovirus and several types of pneumonia. One hundred and twenty seven received a positive result for one of these other respiratory viruses. 

Of the people tested for both SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses, eleven people — or about 22% of the 49 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 8.7% of the 127 people with other respiratory viruses — were found to be co-infected with both kinds of viruses.

The researchers shared their findings March 18 on Medium.com, an online publishing platform, at the request of the California Department of Public Health.”

findings Medium link https://medium.com/@nigam/higher-co-infection-rates-in-covid19-b24965088333

 

Thanks.  My state requires someone to be sick enough to need to be in hospital, the required testing for other viruses first, and only allows a SARS-CoV-2 test if other tests are negative. 

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23 hours ago, Penguin said:

The difference between the Swedish approach and the Danish approach is vast.

Denmark is reopening K through 5 schools next week with some new protective measures in place, one of which is the instruction to keep the kids outside as much as possible.

The differences in the approaches are drastic, but it appears that both countries have seen a doubling in cases about every 10 days, with about twice as many cases at 10 days ago and 4 times as many cases since March 25

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11 hours ago, BeachGal said:

 

Vaccine development has changed quite a bit in the past decade or so. Using inactivated or weakened viruses is considered an old approach. According to what I’ve been reading, it will very likely (almost certainly) not be used for the Covid vaccine. 

The newest vaccine to come out was the Shingrix, which is not a live vaccine and actually much better at protecting people from shingles than the original, live virus shingles vaccine.

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2 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Wapo

Trump retweets call to fire Anthony Fauci after the coronavirus expert says earlier measures "could have saved lives"

Number one=-  Washington Post has been a highly unreliable newspaper for reporting on inside administration details,  They have reported on firings of people that have not happened so many times, reported so-called inside scoops that turned out to be the exact opposite of a policy,  reported misleading reports of policy that are so misleading that people panic but the policy is a slight tweak that should have no one panicking at all (something like Trump is cutting all funding for blank when in reality, his proposed budget is calling for a slightly smaller increase in budget like instead of a 10% raise in budget for a coming year a 9.5% increase), etc, etc.  

Number two=== Fauci was one of the people who could have saved lives and isn't doing it.  He kept spouting the lies that it wasn't airborne until last week or end of the week before.  He also kept discouraging the hydroxychloroquine/zinc/Z-pack combo, although it is saving lives.  

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8 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

Number one=-  Washington Post has been a highly unreliable newspaper for reporting on inside administration details,  They have reported on firings of people that have not happened so many times, reported so-called inside scoops that turned out to be the exact opposite of a policy,  reported misleading reports of policy that are so misleading that people panic but the policy is a slight tweak that should have no one panicking at all (something like Trump is cutting all funding for blank when in reality, his proposed budget is calling for a slightly smaller increase in budget like instead of a 10% raise in budget for a coming year a 9.5% increase), etc, etc.  

Number two=== Fauci was one of the people who could have saved lives and isn't doing it.  He kept spouting the lies that it wasn't airborne until last week or end of the week before.  He also kept discouraging the hydroxychloroquine/zinc/Z-pack combo, although it is saving lives.  

I understand they are quite left wing.  I did check the @trump account and found the retweet though so I think it’s true though maybe not with the level of weight given.  I don’t know much about Fauci except he seemed to be widely praised here earlier.  I don’t know about the chloroquine thing.  I think they were discouraging people here from going crazy buying up on it because it was causing shortages for people who rely on it aside from the Covid thing but I need to check that because it’s a while ago I read it.

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45 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

 

Number two=== Fauci was one of the people who could have saved lives and isn't doing it.  He kept spouting the lies that it wasn't airborne until last week or end of the week before.  He also kept discouraging the hydroxychloroquine/zinc/Z-pack combo, although it is saving lives.  

It's not a lie if you believe it to be true. It's a mistake. I think there's so much confusing data with covid and everything is so new that it is unsurprising if we are finding out new info daily. At first people thought it wasn't spread person to person, turns out that was wrong. People thought it wasn't airborne, or that asymptomatic people weren't contagious; they were wrong. But that doesn't mean people were lying- they were just wrong. 

As far as potential drugs...we still don't know if they work. The evidence is conflicting. That's all Dr Fauci said. He said some evidence said it worked, and some said it had no effect, and it was too soon to know. I don't think it should be promoted as the first line drug when there's others that have also shown promise. We won't know which is best unless they are all trialed.

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57 minutes ago, TravelingChris said:

Number one=-  Washington Post has been a highly unreliable newspaper for reporting on inside administration details,  They have reported on firings of people that have not happened so many times, reported so-called inside scoops that turned out to be the exact opposite of a policy,  reported misleading reports of policy that are so misleading that people panic but the policy is a slight tweak that should have no one panicking at all (something like Trump is cutting all funding for blank when in reality, his proposed budget is calling for a slightly smaller increase in budget like instead of a 10% raise in budget for a coming year a 9.5% increase), etc, etc. 

He retweeted. That is an undeniable fact. I mean unless he deleted it (he often does go back and delete controversial things) then it's still there for anyone who wants to look. And even if he did delete it I'm sure there are plenty of screenshots.

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Trump was praising Hydroxychloroquine and nobody can be crazy buying it except medical doctors because it  (and the more dangerous, chloroquine) are prescription only drugs.  Fauci was wanting long, double blind studies.  There are so many medicines in the US being widely used by doctors for another reason that has never been subject to any study.  I take Trazadone for sleep- never tested.  I originally started taking hydroxychloroquine for Sjogren's - never tested but it was tested for RA and also lupus, I believe.  My kids took clonidine for ADHD- at that point not tested though over twenty years later it has been.  I just read an article last week about how a cancer drug that is injected into the eye is reversing macular degeneration-  also not tested but widely used.  That article cited the quote The perfect is the enemy of the good.  Fauci is wanting the perfect world where we double blind test,  

As to Trump's tweets and retweets-  you may not have noticed it since you are in Australia but he often tweets or retweets threats, etc, but uses them in a psychological way-  his end result is much more moderate.  

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