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wuhan - coronavirus

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56 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Well, crap, my county is an F. I haven't been out in the car since shelter in place started on the 21st; my kids go up and down the cul-de-sac and go to get the mail 1x per day on the corner. DH goes to his work location 1x per week (we do a grocery pickup on that day), and he's picked up prescriptions. However, apparently my neighbors suck at shelter in place. Our surrounding counties are an A (they have the most cases), 2 C's, and another F. Bleah!

My kids did mention our elderly next door neighbors are out a lot - my middle DD was livid when he left today since we've told them time and again we would be more than happy to get them whatever they need and deliver.  She came in ranting about it - I agree with her especially because he was sick with bronchitis in December. 😢

ETA: after reading some of the above replies about it "dinging" the rural counties. I am in a mix of rural/very outskirts of suburban here. No one should have to travel more than about 30 miles within the county - from the far end to the biggest town in the county. Most everybody goes one county over (rated a C) for shopping. We have a Walmart, a couple of grocery store chains in north and south towns, a Walgreens in the southern town, a couple of independent pharmacies, lots of gas stations, fast food places, etc within our county. We do not have any big box store excepting Walmart. I will note that a lot of people from here who commute into the Chicago suburbs for work, but I thought it was a decrease not just how far you traveled, so this shouldn't affect it, right?

 

Edited by beckyjo

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35 minutes ago, Laurie said:

Good questions. I wish I knew the answers.  

I've been interested in hearing about how many hospitalized people with covid are on ventilators...a daily count like the daily death count.  But I've never heard any reports like this on the news, only the concern that there won't be enough.  I've heard the CEO from Evergreen Hospital on MIchael Medved's show a few times since he's the father of Medved's producer.  He has never indicated a crisis situation due to a lack of ventilators, but that things are kind of quiet there because so many surgeries have been canceled. 

I hope there are enough ventilators for the patients who need them.  I have no idea how long it takes to make new ones, but it would be good to have alternatives like the hemolung...especially if someone has to be on a machine for an extended time.  But that's something else I don't know...how long do people typically need to be on a ventilator.  Days or weeks?

 

 

Cuomo has been given the intubation numbers, if you want to watch his briefings. And he says that for COVID-19, the amount of time on a ventilator is 2-3 weeks. 

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33 minutes ago, Laurie said:

 

I've been interested in hearing about how many hospitalized people with covid are on ventilators...a daily count like the daily death count. 

 

 

 

This is announced daily in Israel.  Of the current 5114 active cases, 76 are on ventilators.

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3 minutes ago, beckyjo said:

Well, crap, my county is an F. I haven't been out since shelter in place started on the 21st; my kids go up and down the culdesac and go to get the mail 1x per day on the corner. DH goes to his work location 1x per week (we do a grocery pickup on that day), and he's picked up prescriptions. However, apparently my neighbors suck at shelter in place. Our surrounding counties are an A (they have the most cases), 2 C's, and another F. Bleah!

My kids did mention our elderly next door neighbors are out a lot - my middle DD was livid when he left today since we've told them time and again we would be more than happy to get them whatever they need and deliver.  She came in ranting about it - I agree with her especially because he was sick with bronchitis in December. 😢

 

Again, this is not accurate.  Probably your A where they have the most cases, people are more condensed and things are closer.  That does not prove social distancing at all.  Like someone said, she will meet many more people traveling 1/2 a mile to her store than I will traveling 12 miles to mine.  This math makes no sense.

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Massachusetts https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/coronavirus/11-veterans-dead-after-coronavirus-exposure-at-holyoke-soldiers-home/2264556/

“Eleven veterans have died amid an outbreak of coronavirus at a facility in Holyoke, Massachusetts, Mayor Alex Morse said Tuesday. 

The veterans, residents of the Holyoke Soldiers' Home, died between Wednesday and Monday, Morse said. Five of them tested positive for COVID-19 and the tests for five others were pending, with one victim's information unavailable.

Flags flew at half-staff in the city Tuesday to honor the veterans as well as those veterans fighting the disease, Morse said in a news conference. 

"The veterans and all the people at the soldiers' home, these are people who gave their all, risked their lives to protect all of us, and they deserved better, frankly," he said. 

In total, 11 veteran residents and five staff members tested positive for the disease caused by the new coronavirus, according to NBC affiliate WWLP. Morse said all staff and residents of the facility had been tested by state authorities. 

Massachusetts Health and Human Services Secretary Dan Tsai said in a press release Monday that Bennett Walsh, superintendent of the facility, had been placed on paid administrative leave effective immediately.”

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40 minutes ago, SKL said:

That's interesting, but it penalizes rural people for the fact that nothing is close by.  For example, some of my relatives have to drive a number of miles to get to the nearest grocery store.  And those who have jobs (that happen to be health care related) are driving about an hour each way to work, which is their norm.  It's not like they can do anything about that.  These folks are not out partying.

Yeah. My county doesn't do well because if you don't live in one of the main towns you have to drive a bit to grocery shop. Our essential jobs are mostly in two cities, too, so anyone still working is still mostly driving the same distance for commuting, which usually is a different city from where they live due to cost of living. 

Edited by kdsuomi

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9 minutes ago, Happymomof1 said:

Again, this is not accurate.  Probably your A where they have the most cases, people are more condensed and things are closer.  That does not prove social distancing at all.  Like someone said, she will meet many more people traveling 1/2 a mile to her store than I will traveling 12 miles to mine.  This math makes no sense.

Aren't they comparing to baseline? 

Edited by square_25
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1 hour ago, Arcadia said:

@vonfirmath@Sk8ermaiden@Æthelthryth the Texan

https://abc7news.com/health/28-students-test-positive-for-covid-19-after-mexico-trip/6065814/

“AUSTIN, Texas -- Twenty-eight spring breakers who recently went on a trip to Mexico are self-isolating after testing positive for coronavirus, according to the Austin Public Health Department.

Health officials said a group of about 70 students in their 20s took a chartered plane to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico about a week and a half ago.

A total of 28 students have tested positive for the virus and dozens more are under a public health investigation. The county said four of the confirmed cases did not present any symptoms.”

 

I saw that. 28 cases is a significant portion of the travis County cases currently! We've only got 200 cases total confirmed. No wonder our numbers are so highly tilted to the 20s!

 

What's more, some of these kids came back on other flights, NOT the chartered plane that at least kept the contacts all together as a "big family group" grumble.

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17 minutes ago, gardenmom5 said:

@Arcadia  we have a local company that makes ventilators they have stated they have the capacity to up their production from 100 per month to 1000 per month (So, I assume that means they have all the needed parts.) - their problem is they simply don't have the manpower.  They are looking to hire people with the skills they need, but that is what is holding them back.

We need to have a separate thread urging people to spread these jobs applications online, and how critical they are!  I'm sure if people knew, they would be applying in droves. Maybe local hotels could host people coming in from out of state for these jobs, with reduced rates and a go fund me or something to pay for their housing and food.

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20 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

At least here, the year to date all causes mortality statistics are notably lower than over the previous ten years.  The trajectory of the line was tracking and then went way low, which isn’t really surprising.  Flu deaths have also dropped.

Ah, interesting. Where are you getting the data? 

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8 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

Massachusetts https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/coronavirus/11-veterans-dead-after-coronavirus-exposure-at-holyoke-soldiers-home/2264556/

“Eleven veterans have died amid an outbreak of coronavirus at a facility in Holyoke, Massachusetts, Mayor Alex Morse said Tuesday. 

The veterans, residents of the Holyoke Soldiers' Home, died between Wednesday and Monday, Morse said. Five of them tested positive for COVID-19 and the tests for five others were pending, with one victim's information unavailable.

Flags flew at half-staff in the city Tuesday to honor the veterans as well as those veterans fighting the disease, Morse said in a news conference. 

"The veterans and all the people at the soldiers' home, these are people who gave their all, risked their lives to protect all of us, and they deserved better, frankly," he said. 

In total, 11 veteran residents and five staff members tested positive for the disease caused by the new coronavirus, according to NBC affiliate WWLP. Morse said all staff and residents of the facility had been tested by state authorities. 

Massachusetts Health and Human Services Secretary Dan Tsai said in a press release Monday that Bennett Walsh, superintendent of the facility, had been placed on paid administrative leave effective immediately.”

 

Yes, they did deserve better. This country is witnessing a failure of epic proportions. I don't know if this was posted already, but I read a pretty damning article by Eric J. Topol, MD, the editor-in-chief of Medscape, one of the top 10 most cited researchers in medicine, and the author of "Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again."

"The handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States will go down as the worst public health disaster in the history of the country. The loss of lives will make 9/11 and so many other catastrophes appear much smaller in their scale of devastation. Perhaps what we in the medical community will remember most is how our country betrayed us at the moment when our efforts were needed most."

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927811?fbclid=IwAR0qJh0eSle0XCpWcqjtJ8EvJWXAswPk9uX27dgzoQAOrAEypkOkOpFinc0#vp_1

 

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8 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Aren't they comparing to baseline? 

Yes, that is how I'm reading it. 

It says my county has a less than 10% decrease in average distance traveled. So it doesn't matter if we normally travel farther to go grocery shopping - we're still going as far as we normally do overall. 

Maybe some in higher density areas are choosing the local store rather than the one they really like across town? 

 

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31 minutes ago, gardenmom5 said:

@Arcadia  we have a local company that makes ventilators they have stated they have the capacity to up their production from 100 per month to 1000 per month (So, I assume that means they have all the needed parts.) - their problem is they simply don't have the manpower.  They are looking to hire people with the skills they need, but that is what is holding them back.

 

I’m thinking this deserves it’s own thread, either for just it, or as companies that are hiring.  Because some people here are losing jobs and if they have right skills that could be good to know about.

but they may not be reading the long thread

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9 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Aren't they comparing to baseline? 

 

Yes, but I think that there's a big difference between the way that most of us in urban areas travel, and many people in rural areas travel.

Before DS10, we went lots of places, but if you measured in miles, most the travel I did was to work.  I drove 30 miles a day round trip to work, but outside of work almost everything else is within a couple miles.  Walking distance from my house is my kids' school, my church, the park where they have various sporting practices, the grocery, and hardware, and pharmacy, my in laws, the nearest hospital, the library, my dentist etc . . . .   So, if I stop going to work, then my travel would have fallen 80% even if I didn't socially distance at all otherwise.  And if I cut back to essentials, it would be much less than that.

On the other hand, someone rural who is just driving to the grocery store, the pharmacy, and maybe to drop off what they bought with an elderly relative, might still be putting way more miles on their car, than I would be, and yes they might have traveled more than me before, but maybe not that much more because of those 150 miles I was putting in for work, so their percentage might not fall as much.  Furthermore socially distancing for that person might not look like fewer trips, it might look like doing less on those trips.  So, they might have previously been going to town once and getting groceries, and library books, and taking the kids to dance class, and buying some yarn, all in one trip.  Now they're driving 90% of that distance, but just going to the grocery store and coming back home.  So they're doing much less but the numbers don't reflect it.

Of course, I could be totally wrong, because I've never lived anywhere that wasn't pretty urban, so if I am please tell me rural people!

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1 minute ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

Yes, but I think that there's a big difference between the way that most of us in urban areas travel, and many people in rural areas travel.

Before DS10, we went lots of places, but if you measured in miles, most the travel I did was to work.  I drove 30 miles a day round trip to work, but outside of work almost everything else is within a couple miles.  Walking distance from my house is my kids' school, my church, the park where they have various sporting practices, the grocery, and hardware, and pharmacy, my in laws, the nearest hospital, the library, my dentist etc . . . .   So, if I stop going to work, then my travel would have fallen 80% even if I didn't socially distance at all otherwise.  And if I cut back to essentials, it would be much less than that.

On the other hand, someone rural who is just driving to the grocery store, the pharmacy, and maybe to drop off what they bought with an elderly relative, might still be putting way more miles on their car, than I would be, and yes they might have traveled more than me before, but maybe not that much more because of those 150 miles I was putting in for work, so their percentage might not fall as much.  Furthermore socially distancing for that person might not look like fewer trips, it might look like doing less on those trips.  So, they might have previously been going to town once and getting groceries, and library books, and taking the kids to dance class, and buying some yarn, all in one trip.  Now they're driving 90% of that distance, but just going to the grocery store and coming back home.  So they're doing much less but the numbers don't reflect it.

Of course, I could be totally wrong, because I've never lived anywhere that wasn't pretty urban, so if I am please tell me rural people!

 

Yes, I see that :-). We always try to live close to DH's work, so for us, the calculus doesn't work out like that. But I can see that it would for a lot of people. 

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Just now, square_25 said:

 

Yes, I see that :-). We always try to live close to DH's work, so for us, the calculus doesn't work out like that. But I can see that it would for a lot of people. 

 

And you work from home.  Like many dual income couples, we live close to one parent's work, it just wasn't mine!

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1 hour ago, bolt. said:

I think, if they survive, and don't die at sea within sight of land that has no compassion on their inability to take the warnings of March 7th as seriously as they would have at a later date... I can pretty much guarantee that they will never willingly set foot on a ship again. They will have seen enough suffering for a hundred lifetimes.

Nobody needs the US to "take this on" -- simply quarantine them until they can be loaded onto repatriation flights to their own countries like everybody else who accidentally got stuck in the wrong country when the world's microbiology went to hell at light speed. Maybe the ship should just sail around the world dropping off each passenger at their country of origin like a school bus? What else are they going to do?

The US govt advice not to take a cruise was not until March 8; also at that time South America did not appear to be a high risk destination.  

I also think there are some Americans on the ship.   

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1 minute ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

And you work from home.  Like many dual income couples, we live close to one parent's work, it just wasn't mine!

 

Exactly :-). On the other hand, DD7's homeschool activities being canceled takes care of ALL of our subway time, basically. So we could still be going out to the store, and the tracker wouldn't know as a percentage. So I do see your point. 

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29 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Aren't they comparing to baseline? 

It still doesn't work well in my county. Essential jobs are mostly in the county seat, and most people who work there don't live in the city. They're traveling the same amount and we have a lot of essential workers due to certain government facilities that are here. 

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2 hours ago, Bootsie said:

To be fair this ship departed from Buenos Aires on March 7.  Things changed quickly several days after that.

By March 7th, the people on this ship would have already heard about the issues with coronavirus and cruise ships from the February Princess cruise line experiences.  Plenty of time to have made the decision to cancel and stay home.  

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6912e3.htm

The people on this cruise would have heard something about what happened in Japan and the Princess cruises before their trip began.  Bet Austrailia wishes they had handled things differently.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/24/anatomy-of-a-coronavirus-disaster-how-2700-people-were-let-off-the-ruby-princess-cruise-ship-by-mistake

People are getting COVID 19 after these people willingly choose to get on a cruise ship after hearing about what was going on in China in January and on the Princess cruises in February.

I have a sister on the front line of this and am trying to keep my elderly father and in-laws safe and alive through all of this.  I was busy preparing supplies and meds for them while these poeple were taking their fun, exciting cruises.  

I’m good with how I feel about this situation.

 

 

 

Edited by mlktwins
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33 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Ah, interesting. Where are you getting the data? 

Follow this thread for some work in this area, and also the current issues in reporting/lags.

https://twitter.com/sidsanghi/status/1244268790440955904?s=21

5F0B033E-EB3A-4719-80C0-2A3AD8E64485.thumb.jpeg.b0d938a6bbaedc7a76c148659745225e.jpeg
I can’t remember where I saw more data broken out for this, though.  Too much information flowing too quickly across my feeds 😵

Edited by Arctic Mama
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5 hours ago, Bootsie said:

The US govt advice not to take a cruise was not until March 8; also at that time South America did not appear to be a high risk destination.  

I also think there are some Americans on the ship.   

If people were watching any sort of news at all from January to the beginning of March, they would have known that what they are going through now was a huge possibility.   I didn’t need our government’s advice to know not to take a cruise or fly.  I started preparing before government said I should.  To each their own.

Now their decision will get other poeple not on the cruise sick, wherever the dock.  They should be docking where they started and were suppose to end their trip, which was in Buenos Aires.

Edited by mlktwins
Fixing a boo-boo
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38 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

 

Yes, they did deserve better. This country is witnessing a failure of epic proportions. I don't know if this was posted already, but I read a pretty damning article by Eric J. Topol, MD, the editor-in-chief of Medscape, one of the top 10 most cited researchers in medicine, and the author of "Deep Medicine: How Artificial Intelligence Can Make Healthcare Human Again."

"The handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States will go down as the worst public health disaster in the history of the country. The loss of lives will make 9/11 and so many other catastrophes appear much smaller in their scale of devastation. Perhaps what we in the medical community will remember most is how our country betrayed us at the moment when our efforts were needed most."

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/927811?fbclid=IwAR0qJh0eSle0XCpWcqjtJ8EvJWXAswPk9uX27dgzoQAOrAEypkOkOpFinc0#vp_1

 

 

Not only did they deserve better, current service members deserve better. DoD has the ability to shut this shit down and keep members quarantined on base/ships. They have not done this. They need to. Four weeks ago this ship docked in Vietnam for a port call. STUPID. STUPID. STUPID. https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/military/story/2020-03-31/spread-of-covid-19-on-carrier-theodore-roosevelt-is-ongoing-and-accelerating-captain-says

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11 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

Follow this thread for some work in this area, and also the current issues in reporting/lags.

https://twitter.com/sidsanghi/status/1244268790440955904?s=21

5F0B033E-EB3A-4719-80C0-2A3AD8E64485.thumb.jpeg.b0d938a6bbaedc7a76c148659745225e.jpeg
I can’t remember where I saw more data broken out for this, though.  Too much information flowing too quickly across my feeds 😵

 

They say they now think the data has lags and isn't reliable, if I'm reading correctly? 

Edited by square_25

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Not exactly.  The thought is that there may be some lag, but not enough to explain the margin difference.  Time will clarify the data as with everything relating to this, but it is entirely conceivable that the amount of deaths avoided by a lack of driving, difficulty getting drugs, or exposure to other pathogens like flu and RSV could actually outweigh the deaths from covid 19.  He isn’t the only one beginning to postulate that now that curves are aging and the data is more comprehensive relating to these statistics.

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3 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

Not exactly.  The thought is that there may be some lag, but not enough to explain the margin difference.  Time will clarify the data as with everything relating to this, but it is entirely conceivable that the amount of deaths avoided by a lack of driving, difficulty getting drugs, or exposure to other pathogens like flu and RSV could actually outweigh the deaths from covid 19.  He isn’t the only one beginning to postulate that now that curves are aging and the data is more comprehensive relating to these statistics.

Also, lol, I took another look at that graph. I do NOT hold with graphs that don't start with a 0 on the y-axis ;-). That's the standard way to make a misleading graph. 

It's certainly possible that this could happen. I don't think we'll know for a while, though. The record-keeping is bound to be chaotic for a bit. 

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4 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

Not exactly.  The thought is that there may be some lag, but not enough to explain the margin difference.  Time will clarify the data as with everything relating to this, but it is entirely conceivable that the amount of deaths avoided by a lack of driving, difficulty getting drugs, or exposure to other pathogens like flu and RSV could actually outweigh the deaths from covid 19.  He isn’t the only one beginning to postulate that now that curves are aging and the data is more comprehensive relating to these statistics.

Also, here's their thread saying their figure shouldn't be used: 

 

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1 hour ago, Laurie said:

Good questions. I wish I knew the answers.  

I've been interested in hearing about how many hospitalized people with covid are on ventilators...a daily count like the daily death count.  But I've never heard any reports like this on the news, only the concern that there won't be enough.  I've heard the CEO from Evergreen Hospital on MIchael Medved's show a few times since he's the father of Medved's producer.  He has never indicated a crisis situation due to a lack of ventilators, but that things are kind of quiet there because so many surgeries have been canceled. 

I hope there are enough ventilators for the patients who need them.  I have no idea how long it takes to make new ones, but it would be good to have alternatives like the hemolung...especially if someone has to be on a machine for an extended time.  But that's something else I don't know...how long do people typically need to be on a ventilator.  Days or weeks?

 

 

You might try signing up to your governor or state health department emails. Vent and bed count and use are all things they have to report up to federal gov and they might include that in their email updates. At least I know mine does.  
This one is just for my county. 
 

274E1371-8EE4-4C3C-B74C-1475C5043A9A.png

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Just now, Plum said:

You might try signing up to your governor or state health department emails. Vent and bed count and use are all things they have to report up to federal gov and they might include that in their email updates. At least I know mine does.  
This one is just for my county. 
 

274E1371-8EE4-4C3C-B74C-1475C5043A9A.png

 

I gotta say, this crisis has made me VERY aware of local government, in a way I haven't been before. 

 

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🙂 https://mobile.twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1245009716935188481

 
 
“We have extra FDA-approved ventilators. Will ship to hospitals worldwide within Tesla delivery regions. Device & shipping cost are free. Only requirement is that the vents are needed immediately for patients, not stored in a warehouse. Please me or @Tesla know.
8:27 AM · Mar 31, 2020”
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Bno:  Italy confirms 4,053 new cases and 837 new deaths since yesterday, raising total to 105,792 cases and 12,428 dead
 

deaths are still high but yet another day of downward trend on new confirmed cases.

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@Plum@Pen@mathnerd@gardenmom5@ElizabethB
https://techcrunch.com/2020/03/30/medtronic-is-sharing-its-portable-ventilator-design-specifications-and-code-for-free-to-all/

“Medtronic is making available to anyone the full design specifications, produce manuals, design documents and, in the future, software code for its Puritan Bennett (PB) 560 portable ventilator hardware.

The PB 560 ventilator has a number of advantages, one being that it’s a relatively compact and lightweight piece of equipment that can be easily moved around and installed for use in a range of different healthcare environments and settings. And it’s a design that was originally introduced in 2010, so it has a decade of qualified, safe medical use in treating patients.

... But this move by Medtronic makes freely available everything needed to spin up new production lines at existing manufacturers around the world — without any costs or fees owed to Medtronic.

It’s still obviously true that retooling a production line to build a different product is going to be an undertaking, no matter what kind of design specifications you’re starting with. But this initiative by Medtronic is also intended to provide the resources necessary for anyone looking at what they can build today — a blueprint to spawn new and innovative ideas. Manufacturers might be able to look at Medtronic’s proven design and engineer something they can build at scale relatively quickly that offers the same or similar performance characteristics.

Medtronic says the design is particularly well-suited for “inventors, startups, and academic institutions” looking to spin up production in short order and create their own adapted designs.

“We are sharing the design specifications for the [PB 560] to enable participants across industries to evaluate options for rapid ventilator manufacturing to help doctors and patients dealing with COVID-19,” said John Jordan, External Communications Director at the Minimally Invasive Therapies Group at Medtronic.

...

It’s worth noting that Medtronic isn’t open-sourcing the PB 560’s design exactly: it’s issuing a special “permissive license” specifically for the purposes of addressing this global coronavirus pandemic, and its term ends either when the World Health Organization’s official Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) is declared over, or on October 1, 2024, whichever comes first.

Still, it’s a sign of the extent and seriousness of the COVID-19 crisis that for-profit corporations like Medtronic would even consider doing something like making free for broad public use a code technology they’ve developed, even if only for a fixed time frame.

Any startup or hardware maker interested in checking out the plans for the PB 560 and potentially using them to build their own equipment can register here to agree to the license and get access to the files.”

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40 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

Not only did they deserve better, current service members deserve better. DoD has the ability to shut this shit down and keep members quarantined on base/ships. They have not done this. They need to. Four weeks ago this ship docked in Vietnam for a port call. STUPID. STUPID. STUPID. https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/military/story/2020-03-31/spread-of-covid-19-on-carrier-theodore-roosevelt-is-ongoing-and-accelerating-captain-says

 

I am hoping that this story breaking wakes up a few people who have a misguided notion of what combat readiness means in the face of a pandemic. Or at least causes them to see how embarrassing it would be politically to repeat this scenario knowing the cost.

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10 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I have seen this mentioned in relation to Germany’s lower death rate - they are doing very few posthumous tests.

And even with that, they are inching up to 1%, hm. 

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1 hour ago, beckyjo said:

Yes, that is how I'm reading it. 

It says my county has a less than 10% decrease in average distance traveled. So it doesn't matter if we normally travel farther to go grocery shopping - we're still going as far as we normally do overall. 

Maybe some in higher density areas are choosing the local store rather than the one they really like across town? 

My county probably deserves its C, but a high percentage of my small rural town either works at the local hospital, a local manufacturing plant, or for the utilities. (The school system is another large employer, but more like 10% vs. 50%+ for the other three listed.) So, most of those are still working.

For us, I've chosen to travel into the bigger town (30 min away, still under 7,500 population) to take advantage of Wal-Mart pickup than walk across the street to enter the grocery store in person. So yeah, traveling further. 

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Took screenshots of the horrible graphs Dr. Birx just showed at the press conference in case one of you wanted to look at them. 

2E175D2F-47F1-45A9-BF93-A3E3B9EBB9EB.png

7570B7FD-BA58-45E0-B4AF-51FD6D10ED4B.png

159BD600-1D85-4052-A6EA-838C05EEEB6F.png

E120FB7C-7211-4BBA-BF53-A255E724C49F.png

9853D349-43CF-47E0-BAF9-AFAB4F6760FF.png

Edited by Plum
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@RootAnn@Pen

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/coronavirus-covid-19-uk-boy-dies-12596462

“LONDON: A 13-year-old British boy has died days after testing positive for COVID-19, hospital officials and his family said on Tuesday (Mar 31), with relatives saying he had no underlying illnesses.

The boy, who died Monday at King's College Hospital in London, is believed to be Britain's youngest confirmed death in the coronavirus pandemic.

A 12-year-old girl, whose death was confirmed earlier on Tuesday in Belgium, is thought to be Europe's youngest victim.

The boy's family said Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab "started showing symptoms and had difficulties breathing" before he was admitted to hospital.

"He was put on a ventilator and then put into an induced coma but sadly died yesterday morning," the family said through a family friend, Mark Stephenson, adding: "We are beyond devastated."

Nathalie MacDermott, a lecturer at King's College, said: "While we know it is much less likely for children to suffer severe COVID-19 infection than older adults, this case highlights the importance of us all taking the precautions we can to reduce the spread of infection in the UK and worldwide."

She urged research into deaths outside the groups expected to succumb to infection as it "may indicate an underlying genetic susceptibility."

On Tuesday, Britain announced 381 deaths from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, the highest figure in the country since the start of the pandemic, bringing the death toll to 1,789.”

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1 minute ago, Arcadia said:

@RootAnn@Pen

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/coronavirus-covid-19-uk-boy-dies-12596462

“LONDON: A 13-year-old British boy has died days after testing positive for COVID-19, hospital officials and his family said on Tuesday (Mar 31), with relatives saying he had no underlying illnesses.

The boy, who died Monday at King's College Hospital in London, is believed to be Britain's youngest confirmed death in the coronavirus pandemic.

A 12-year-old girl, whose death was confirmed earlier on Tuesday in Belgium, is thought to be Europe's youngest victim.

The boy's family said Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab "started showing symptoms and had difficulties breathing" before he was admitted to hospital.

"He was put on a ventilator and then put into an induced coma but sadly died yesterday morning," the family said through a family friend, Mark Stephenson, adding: "We are beyond devastated."

Nathalie MacDermott, a lecturer at King's College, said: "While we know it is much less likely for children to suffer severe COVID-19 infection than older adults, this case highlights the importance of us all taking the precautions we can to reduce the spread of infection in the UK and worldwide."

She urged research into deaths outside the groups expected to succumb to infection as it "may indicate an underlying genetic susceptibility."

On Tuesday, Britain announced 381 deaths from COVID-19 in the past 24 hours, the highest figure in the country since the start of the pandemic, bringing the death toll to 1,789.”

 

On the one hand, that's really sad for the kids and the families. 

On the other hand, focusing on these extremely events definitely increases panic. From what I've seen, this disease is NOT worse than the flu in minors (please correct me if I'm wrong.) I feel like keeping track of the rare minors it does kill isn't useful. 

 

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https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/france-production-masks-respirators-covid-19-macron-12594786

“Macron said consumption of face masks in France had soared from 4 million per week to more than 40 million and the state's pre-crisis inventory of 140 million masks was insufficient.

"Before, we believed that we could import masks quickly and in great quantity from the other side of the world ... and that we did not need to store billions and billions of face masks," Macron said during a visit to the Kolmi-Hopen face mask factory near Angers, western France.

He added the world has changed and that there is now unprecedented tension on global markets and that France needed to boost domestic production to become self-sufficient.

France has ordered more than one billion face masks from China and the first orders are already arriving, Macron said.

France's four face mask factories will also boost their combined output from 3.3 million per week before the start of the crisis to 10 million per week by end April, and production by new players such as car parts maker Faurecia, tire maker Michelin and retailer Intermarché will push total output to 15 million per week, Macron said.

In addition, in three to four weeks the country will also be able to produce a million masks per day for people in other professions than the medical sector, he said.

Macron said a consortium led by respirator maker Air Liquide and including car parts maker Valeo, carmaker PSA and Schneider Electric, will produce some 10,000 ventilators by mid-May.

Some 250 emergency rooms ventilators will be delivered in the coming eight days, he added.

France has also boosted its production of disinfecting hand gel from 40,000 liters per day to 500,000 litres per day.

The French government will fund the purchase of masks and ventilators with a 4 billion euro (US$4.4 billion) boost to the state health budget.“

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@SeaConquest

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/national-international/cruise-ships-no-longer-able-to-drop-off-passengers-in-sd-under-new-restrictions/2264762/

“Several cruise ship passengers have been able to disembark in San Diego over the past two weeks but after Tuesday, those vessels will no longer be able to drop off its passengers in America’s Finest City through the end of the coronavirus pandemic.

County officials announced Monday during a coronavirus update that cruise ships will only be able to dock in San Diego for fuel or for supplies. The move was made amid concerns of COVID-19.

On Tuesday, county health officials confirmed a passenger aboard the Celebrity Eclipse tested positive for the novel coronavirus. It's the last ship that's allowed to drop off passengers in the city and it will continue to do so on Tuesday. Passengers will be screened prior to their departure and only those who have no symptoms or fever will be released.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urge Celebrity Eclipse passengers to self-quarantine for 14 days once they arrive home as a precaution.

A Disney Cruise ship that docked at the Port of San Diego last week said in a statement that two crewmembers and a “handful of guests” tested positive for the novel coronavirus.”

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20 minutes ago, square_25 said:

 

On the one hand, that's really sad for the kids and the families. 

On the other hand, focusing on these extremely events definitely increases panic. From what I've seen, this disease is NOT worse than the flu in minors (please correct me if I'm wrong.) I feel like keeping track of the rare minors it does kill isn't useful. 

 

I wonder if they are highlighting it in an attempt to get through to those young people who are unconcerned because they perceive no threat to themselves as individuals and are reluctant to comply with social distancing?

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21 minutes ago, square_25 said:

 

On the one hand, that's really sad for the kids and the families. 

On the other hand, focusing on these extremely events definitely increases panic. From what I've seen, this disease is NOT worse than the flu in minors (please correct me if I'm wrong.) I feel like keeping track of the rare minors it does kill isn't useful. 

 

I suspect if they look more closely he may have had an undiagnosed underlying problem.   I think we will never know, but I hope the family is able to receive more information for their peace of mind.  How awful for them.

 

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4 minutes ago, TCB said:

I wonder if they are highlighting it in an attempt to get through to those young people who are unconcerned because they perceive no threat to themselves as individuals and are reluctant to comply with social distancing?

I guess so? It still seems rather dishonest :-(. But I understand the temptation to find "human stories." The problem is that you can find a human story for just about anything -- kids die tragic deaths from all sorts of things. The scary story about this virus is in the numbers... 

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23 minutes ago, square_25 said:

On the other hand, focusing on these extremely events definitely increases panic. From what I've seen, this disease is NOT worse than the flu in minors (please correct me if I'm wrong.) I feel like keeping track of the rare minors it does kill isn't useful. 

 

1 minute ago, TCB said:

I wonder if they are highlighting it in an attempt to get through to those young people who are unconcerned because they perceive no threat to themselves as individuals and are reluctant to comply with social distancing?


Parents too. Some parents are thinking kids won’t be infected 🙃
Also the initial messages on social media were that elderly and people with underlying conditions are the only ones susceptible, think they are just doing their job as news journalists to raise awareness now. 

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Still, the kid stories without the context of the larger infection statistics backing up that children catching it and experiencing severe complications and death is a statistically extremely rare occurrence is misleading to the point it looks like a scare tactic.  And that sort of reporting in other area has already damaged the credibility of many outlets, so you think they’d want to be painfully accurate and fastidious  😬

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36 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

 


Parents too. Some parents are thinking kids won’t be infected 🙃
Also the initial messages on social media were that elderly and people with underlying conditions are the only ones susceptible, think they are just doing their job as news journalists to raise awareness now. 

 

But it's extremely uncommon. What is the point of raising awareness for something less likely to kill your kid than the flu? Or then being in a car? (Again, correct me if I'm wrong.) 

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35 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

I suspect if they look more closely he may have had an undiagnosed underlying problem.   I think we will never know, but I hope the family is able to receive more information for their peace of mind.  How awful for them.

 

 

18 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

Still, the kid stories without the context of the larger infection statistics backing up that children catching it and experiencing severe complications and death is a statistically extremely rare occurrence is misleading to the point it looks like a scare tactic.  And that sort of reporting in other area has already damaged the credibility of many outlets, so you think they’d want to be painfully accurate and fastidious  😬

 

Maybe.  Or maybe that tuberculosis vaccine infants get in other countries REALLY DOES prevent deaths from children, and maybe it's partially the reason why younger people have some of their immunity. So far the infant that died in Chicago they haven't found a good explanation.  I'm sure they'll run genetic tests and do a full autopsy, but we don't know what happened.

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2 minutes ago, square_25 said:

 

But it's extremely uncommon. What is the point of raising awareness for something less likely to kill your kid than the flu? Or then being in a car? (Again, correct me if I'm wrong.) 

I think if they promote the message heavily that kids don’t die and then one kid does they are going to get a pretty negative reaction.  But yeah to some extent it’s just about running a human interest story.

 

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44 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

I suspect if they look more closely he may have had an undiagnosed underlying problem.   I think we will never know, but I hope the family is able to receive more information for their peace of mind.  How awful for them.

 

In the stat report I posted yesterday from New York with the breakdown they had pre existing, no pre existing and being ascertained so I think they are looking for them.

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