Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 17k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Ausmumof3

    3398

  • Pen

    2519

  • Arcadia

    1337

  • prairiewindmomma

    309

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

DS got home 3 hours ago!  ❤️❤️

Update-  my youngest is not only short of breath, coughing, dizzy, nausaues, and with headache-  she is also confused.  I called our doctor and talked with him and she is going to be going to the ER.

Thought I'd post a pic of my dd, getting ready to spend another day in a coronavirus triage tent!  

Posted Images

1 hour ago, vonfirmath said:

 

I wish this was true because it would mean most of my sponsored kids' families would be fine because they tend to live in countries along the equator. And they tend to live their lives outside. But Ecuador is being hit HARD -- Bodies in the street and everything  It may have an effect, but not enough.

 

 

I think vitamin D could help hugely “all other things being equal” and doing other things that would tend to stop the spread— Stay Home Stay Safe ; distance of at least 2 meters when Stay Home isn’t possible; ...     I’m certainly going to keep taking my D3 as I expect it might well make a difference between being able to survive or not if I do become exposed.  At the same time, I am doing what I can not to be exposed (or if I should happen to have been exposed and be an asymptomatic carrier the same precautions would also help to not expose others ). 

Using Sun to make D also depends on the body having cholesterol to convert into D (I wonder if some places push to “lower cholesterol intake” or perhaps lack of cholesterol containing foods due to culture or poverty would affect making D even if there’s enough sun), and the body has to be able to do the metabolic conversion from skin cholesterol plus sun (probably plus other needed cofactors too) to build Vitamin D.   Even with enough sun apparently many older people no longer metabolize D well. And apparently some younger people also have less good D creating metabolism even if they have the nutritional building blocks and adequate sun.

Having lived in Brazil though, I would say it is not necessarily the case that everyone in an equatorial area gets enough sun for good D production. For example, some older less mobile people may spend time largely indoors and in shade. People who have indoors type occupations (which may include doctors and nurses) may have relatively little sun time and may be dressed to cover most skin.  Skin darkness matters too with regard to how much time needs to spent in sun to make D.

And then, it looks like Ecuador populace lacks a lot of other helpful factors for slowing spread of CV19. 

Pictures I see out of Ecuador show people bunched together, sometimes bunched together while wearing a mask, sometimes not; lack of sufficient PPE etc.;  and performing activities like pouring soapy water in streets and mopping it about which may or may not be particularly useful to Stop Spread... 

Dead and decomposing bodies sounds just awful and seems likely to lead to other health problems too.  

[I noticed that descriptions out of Ecuador sound (and look on news reels) like what people were describing for Wuhan, but that China and WHO denied.]

Do you have any contact with your sponsored kids? 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, square_25 said:

 

The media can't provide equipment, though. Focusing on the wrong stuff doesn't actually keep equipment away from the hospitals. 

Anyway, it's probably too late for the federal government to use the DPA to make PPE to help NY :-(. It's too bad. I hope people keep donating and stepping up locally. 

 

The Forbes (?) article about huge amounts of masks etc being sold to highest bidders overseas when NY and other domestic hospitals need it so badly deeply concerned me. 

 

  • Like 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

Possibly OT but if anyone doubts value of the former CO of the Teddy Roosevelt’s leadership, this is the send off he justifiably received. Going out like a boss. https://thehill.com/policy/defense/490979-sailors-cheer-navy-captain-who-was-removed-after-pleading-for-help-with

 

And I don’t know what he will do next, but whatever it is, a lot of people will see him as a hero, and I expect will want to help. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, square_25 said:

Oh, I didn't see that. Show me?

 

I think it was in this thread.

I’ll try google 😊 easier than trying to find it here.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@square_25 I don’t know this publication but it alsocame from my search 

https://theintercept.com/2020/04/01/coronavirus-medical-supplies-export/

 

ETA I guess flipside is that if USA cases hadn’t blown up, we would have been criticized by international community and probably domestic press and many, many American people for “putting America first” and hoarding supplies while Asia and Europe needed them.  (And, ironically, if more PPE had been kept, and rapidly issued to first responders and medical workers, perhaps our numbers would have been lower, making it seem like keeping the equipment here was not justified.) 

 

Edited by Pen
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

And I don’t know what he will do next, but whatever it is, a lot of people will see him as a hero, and I expect will want to help. 


Indeed. People who distinguish themselves in times of crisis always prosper in the end. We need more leaders like this.

  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

@Pen Singapore is finally going to be shelter in place from April 7th. Hairdressers are allowed to stay open 😞 (so my in-laws still have a place to go to gossip) 

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/covid19-decisive-move-workplaces-closed-lee-hsien-loong-12606614

 

I wonder why hairdressers were exempted. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, square_25 said:

Anyone seen this? 

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/04/01/nyregion/nyc-coronavirus-cases-map.html

If you know NYC geography, the map is interesting. Manhattan is definitely not particularly hard-hit. The airport also doesn't look like the center of an issue. 

They do seem to be suggesting that larger families that all gather together are the problem. I guess with lots of people in the house, there's a high chance SOMEONE is an "essential worker" :-/. 

My suspicion is that it has to do with viral load. If you have someone in a large family who starts to get it and spreads ir to other family members then you have a lot of the virus clustered in one place. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Ausmumof3@Pen

 🇸🇬 https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/covid-19-singapore-airlines-care-ambassadors-hospital-manpower-12608118

“SINGAPORE: Singapore Airlines (SIA) will provide at least 300 "care ambassadors" to help fill a manpower gap at hospitals, in light of the rising number of COVID-19 cases in the country. 

Responding to CNA's queries on Friday (Apr 3), the national carrier said there is an "urgent and growing need to fill the manpower gap for the care of other patients as hospital nurses are re-directed from their original duties to care for patients infected with COVID-19".”

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Pen said:

 

The Forbes (?) article about huge amounts of masks etc being sold to highest bidders overseas when NY and other domestic hospitals need it so badly deeply concerned me. 

 

Yes, now that’s a place where the federal government could have intervened early on. Other countries did.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2020 at 5:00 AM, Carrie12345 said:

Like doctors and nurses, EMT training (locally, at least) is being modified to get students certified.  My 17yo is resenting my 16yo a bit right now!  Even though the younger will get certified, she’s still unable to be employed until she turns 18 next year.  But the older turns 18 in less than 2 months, and I know she’s going to be raring to go! I’m trying to wait until the end of this month before sitting down and having real conversations about that.

 

On 4/2/2020 at 5:19 AM, StellaM said:

 

Needing to have that convo too - with my young nurse, now that thousands of free ICU nurse training places have opened up here. There will be heavy recruitment. 

I think PTSD is a real risk for young people in health care professions atm. I mean, for everyone, but young people particularly.

Paramedics here are against a proposal to allow students to work in the field, for the above reasons and others. 

Good luck having the conversation.

 

 

In my area all EMS student clinicals (at all levels — EMT, AEMT, paramedic) and I think nursing and allied health profession  clinicals were suspended several weeks ago. The schools and the EMS systems, including the one I work for, decided the students’ physical and mental health were more important than rushing their training. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

😞 @mathnerd

https://abc7news.com/health/grand-princess-cruise-ship-crew-member-dies-at-sf-hospital/6073373/

“SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- A crew member from the Grand Princess Ship that docked in Oakland has died. The crew member died of coronavirus in a San Francisco hospital after being transferred off the ship last month.

Hundreds of workers still remain onboard the Grand Princess that is now docked at its homeport at the San Francisco Cruise terminal. Their 14-day quarantine ends tomorrow”

  • Sad 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, DoraBora said:

I don't know that the feds were "focusing" on ppe theft.  He mentioned it and people took umbrage.  I'm sorry that NY is so hard hit.

 

3 hours ago, square_25 said:

 

Well, yes, people took umbrage, because it shifts responsibility. But it's definitely only inappropriate in context -- if they had gotten factories to product tons of PPEs and then were worried because some were unaccountably "missing," that would be different. Instead, there's a lot of incredulity about how vast the numbers are, and theorizing that the numbers aren't really as large as the governors make them out to be. That makes people concerned that they aren't being taken seriously. 

I found it offensive as DH works in healthcare, and they are stretching PPE. Somewhere before POTUS's remarks, I think I mentioned that PPE stealing is a thing without a pandemic. Unless they keep everything super locked up (as they probably are now), which affects productivity, people do tend to help themselves to gloves, masks, paper towels, wipes, etc. when they show up in EDs and doctor's office of all kinds. It's like when people take extra disposable silverware, napkins, condiments, and tea bags at a restaurant. 

But I agree that it's not a wrong question in a different context. 

2 hours ago, Pen said:

The Forbes (?) article about huge amounts of masks etc being sold to highest bidders overseas when NY and other domestic hospitals need it so badly deeply concerned me. 

I thought I saw a report somewhere that the US is stopping exports (finally). I am unable to keep up with the links, but maybe someone else has seen this too. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2020 at 11:21 PM, Arcadia said:

Keep the children entertained while parents work from home 😉 

As an aside, jigsaws on tables at the cancer center I go to for my appointments is very popular with patients.

Haven't made it to the end of the thread yet, but I busted out laughing when I realized you were talking about puzzles and not the thing that cuts wood! I am embarrassed to say it took several posts of me thinking, "Well, I guess making shapes of of wood could be therapeutic, how progressive they are!"

  • Like 2
  • Haha 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, kbutton said:

 

I found it offensive as DH works in healthcare, and they are stretching PPE. Somewhere before POTUS's remarks, I think I mentioned that PPE stealing is a thing without a pandemic. Unless they keep everything super locked up (as they probably are now), which affects productivity, people do tend to help themselves to gloves, masks, paper towels, wipes, etc. when they show up in EDs and doctor's office of all kinds. It's like when people take extra disposable silverware, napkins, condiments, and tea bags at a restaurant. 

But I agree that it's not a wrong question in a different context. 

I thought I saw a report somewhere that the US is stopping exports (finally). I am unable to keep up with the links, but maybe someone else has seen this too. 

Germany did this months ago with regards to masks. I wish we had acted then too!

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, saraha said:

Haven't made it to the end of the thread yet, but I busted out laughing when I realized you were talking about puzzles and not the thing that cuts wood! I am embarrassed to say it took several posts of me thinking, "Well, I guess making shapes of of wood could be therapeutic, how progressive they are!"

Carpentry is therapeutic too 🙂

If liability isn’t an issue, a makerspace corner at cancer centers would be a welcome distraction too. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, kbutton said:

 

I found it offensive as DH works in healthcare, and they are stretching PPE. Somewhere before POTUS's remarks, I think I mentioned that PPE stealing is a thing without a pandemic. Unless they keep everything super locked up (as they probably are now), which affects productivity, people do tend to help themselves to gloves, masks, paper towels, wipes, etc. when they show up in EDs and doctor's office of all kinds. It's like when people take extra disposable silverware, napkins, condiments, and tea bags at a restaurant. 

But I agree that it's not a wrong question in a different context. 

I thought I saw a report somewhere that the US is stopping exports (finally). I am unable to keep up with the links, but maybe someone else has seen this too. 

 

President of US has just invoked his Emergency Defense powers to try to stop 3M from exporting its PPE. (According news flash  up till at least a few minutes ago it has been exporting most of what it produces—and isn’t producing enough even if it were not exporting most) 

Just got news flash a few minutes ago

Edited by Pen
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Pen said:

ETA I guess flipside is that if USA cases hadn’t blown up, we would have been criticized by international community and probably domestic press and many, many American people for “putting America first” and hoarding supplies while Asia and Europe needed them.  (And, ironically, if more PPE had been kept, and rapidly issued to first responders and medical workers, perhaps our numbers would have been lower, making it seem like keeping the equipment here was not justified.) 

 

Ummm... Yeah! Canadians and other trade partners are not impressed.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/3m-n95-masks-1.5520326

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

President of US has just invoked his Emergency Defense powers to try to stop 3M from exporting its PPE. (According news flash  up till at least a few minutes ago it has been exporting most of what it produces—and isn’t producing enough even if it were not exporting most) 

Just got news flash a few minutes ago

It’s all over the news now

https://www.marketwatch.com/story/3m-argues-against-ceasing-exports-of-respirators-as-it-preps-to-work-with-fema-to-boost-production-2020-04-03

“3M Co. MMM-3.23% said Friday the administration of President Donald Trump has asked it to cease exporting respirators that are made in the U.S. to Latin America and Canada, given they are in short supply during the coronavirus pandemic. The company said it is a vital supplier of that equipment in those markets and that there are "signifiant humanitarian implications" to such a move. "Ceasing all export of respirators produced in the United States would likely cause other countries to retaliate and do the same, as some have already done," the company said in a statement. "If that were to occur, the net number of respirators being made available to the United States would actually decrease. That is the opposite of what we and the Administration, on behalf of the American people, both seek. " The company, which was criticized by Trump at a Thursday briefing after it said demand for N95 respirators was exceeding capacity, said it is looking forward to working with FEMA to boost production after Trump invoked the Defense Production Act against the company, giving the federal government more control over its operations. The company has received approval to import 10 million N95 masks made at 3M facilities in China back to the U.S.”

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sneezyone said:


Indeed. People who distinguish themselves in times of crisis always prosper in the end. We need more leaders like this.

Meanwhile, the Navy is still putting sailors on a carrier based in the greater Seattle area. Claiming quarantine will solve the problem and not disclosing number of cases because of OPSEC. 

https://www.kitsapsun.com/story/news/2020/04/02/washington-coronavirus-uss-nimitz-crew-preparation-on-board-quarantine/5115234002/

All the Navy would need to do at this point to save face is declare a 30 or 60 day operational pause to preserve military readiness and safeguard their sailors' health. Why they want another embarrassing incident with a contaminated carrier is beyond me.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Where's Toto? said:

I just saw that EMTs can't bring anybody in cardiac arrest that they weren't able to revive to a hospital in NYC.  They need to just leave them.😢

To be fair, this is SOP in several areas and has been for several years. (In my system EMTs don’t work codes, paramedics do.) My system’s protocols call for working codes (read cardiac arrests of all etiologies) for a specified time then calling for a pronouncement based on certain clinical criteria. This is a bit of a simplification and there are circumstances where we do transport with CPR in progress, but by and large, there is no benefit to the patient and increased danger to the paramedics and public when transporting with lights and sirens. With the major exception of ECMO ERs don’t do anything that a good (or really just decent) EMS system can’t do. And ECMO machines are not something every hospital has.

As harsh as it may sound, COVID or no COVID, neurologically intact survival rates of patients who were in cardiac arrest are pretty darn low. In fact, survival rates without considering neurological outcomes are very low. Your best chance of survival is having a sudden cardiac arrest due to cardiac issues and then having early compressions and, as appropriate, early defibrillation. This applies to both in hospital arrests and out of hospital arrests. 

 

  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
59 minutes ago, TCB said:

Germany did this months ago with regards to masks. I wish we had acted then too!

Germany has been a model of excellent governmental response. early rapid testing, large number of tests, protecting the elderly, etc etc.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

Scores of countries have moved to restrict the export of face masks, gloves and other medical supplies critical for front-line workers in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, leaving Canada and others scrambling to source products that now have higher price tags.

Sixty-eight countries — Canada is not among them — have curbed exports of personal protective equipment or medicine, according to Simon Evenett, a professor of international trade at Switzerland’s University of St. Gallen.

On Tuesday, China responded to complaints from Europe about ineffective coronavirus test kits by tightening standards around certification of medical goods for export.

The decision seeks to clamp down on defective products, but could have the effect of further slashing supply from a country that produces half of the world’s personal protective equipment — also known as PPE.

Omar Allam, who heads an Ottawa-based global trade consultancy, said the move aims to bolster China’s reputation, but effectively severs Canadian wholesalers from some reputable Chinese manufacturers by tacking on red tape that trips up the supply chain.

Officials across the country this week warned that equipment shortfalls are placing health-care workers and vulnerable Canadians at growing risk of exposure to the virus.

A lack of supply and surging demand have sent prices soaring for goods from gowns to gloves, swabs and face shields.

“One government had placed an order for 200 million masks from China. And what this did overnight to the price of masks was to treble them,” Evenett said.

Air cargo rates have also shot up as airlines park planes — which often carry freight as well as passenger luggage — due to plummeting travel demand.

“I would say that they’ve more than doubled, even tripled,” said Gary Hopkins, managing director of U.S.-based Air Charter Service’s Toronto office.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau promised Wednesday that federal health authorities will not cut any corners when it comes to making sure masks provided by China meet the necessary standards.

The comments followed an announcement from the Chinese Embassy in Ottawa that the country is sending 30,000 medical masks along with thousands of gowns, gloves and goggles to Canada.

The shipment was announced amid reports that the Dutch government is recalling around 600,000 defective masks that were recently shipped from China. Spain has also raised concerns about Chinese-made COVID-19 testing kits that were faulty.

On Tuesday night, China’s Ministry of Commerce announced that PPE — which includes COVID-19 test kits, N95 respirator masks, ventilators and infrared thermometers — can only be exported if its manufacturers show certification by a national registry and documentation proving it meets the import country’s standards. The exports will be checked at customs in China to confirm the paperwork, according to the government release.

At the height of the crisis there, Beijing sought to buy virtually all of the country’s medical supplies and withhold exports, Evenett said.

“Now the government is letting selected Chinese medical suppliers ship abroad. But because it’s a pretty ad hoc and non-transparent system, it’s pretty much tantamount to an informal export ban,” said Evenett.

“This is the worst type of short-term thinking,” he said.

Since the start of the week, more than 11 million face masks have arrived in Canada, including a shipment of one million masks that reached a Hamilton warehouse overnight, Trudeau said Thursday.

The government has spoken with nearly 3,000 companies to secure “millions of pieces of vital equipment,” he said.

Ottawa has also co-signed a statement with partners including Singapore, New Zealand, Australia and others to keep supply chains open.

https://globalnews.ca/news/6769162/canada-medical-supplies-coronavirus/

  • Like 1
  • Sad 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Frances said:

Germany has been a model of excellent governmental response. early rapid testing, large number of tests, protecting the elderly, etc etc.

 

1 hour ago, TCB said:

Germany did this months ago with regards to masks. I wish we had acted then too!

 

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/germany-covid-19-coronavirus-measures-working-12607270

“BERLIN: Measures taken by German officials to slow the spread of the coronavirus are starting to show effect, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) for disease control said on Friday (Apr 3).

"We are seeing that the spread of the virus is getting slower ... it's working," said RKI president Lothar Wieler, stressing that restrictions on public life "need to be maintained" and it was too early to claim victory.

Wieler explained that each person who had caught the virus was now infecting only one person on average, where previously that number had been as high as seven.

"If the number is below one, then it means the epidemic is slowly easing up. That is our aim," he said.

"We know that we have pushed the number down to one with the measures, and we hope to push it down further."

Wieler nonetheless urged the public to keep observing government restrictions, which include a ban on public gatherings of more than two people and a requirement to stay at least 1.5m from others at all times.

"I need to say very clearly: the measures need to be maintained. Keeping your distance and staying at home is imperative, otherwise, we will not push the number under one," he said.

...

Meanwhile, the RKI altered its recommendations on Friday to encourage citizens to wear self-made masks in public.

It was "important to understand" that such masks would not protect the wearer, but they could help to protect others, said Wieler.

He added that there was "not yet any scientific proof" that the masks would limit the spread of the virus, but it "seemed plausible".

According to RKI figures on Friday, Germany has recorded more than 79,000 cases of the novel coronavirus.

A total of 1,017 deaths have been recorded, though RKI president Wieler warned Friday that the actual number could be much higher.

"We won't manage to test every single person ... I assume we will have more deaths than are officially recorded," he said.

Wieler also said that the mortality rate would "continue to rise" in Germany.

Latest figures showed that the death rate in Europe's largest economy had jumped to 1.2 per cent, still considerably lower than that of neighbouring countries.”

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

On March 20, 2020, Russia, the world’s largest wheat exporter, announced a ten-day ban on the export of buckwheat and rice due to concerns over panic buying in local supermarkets. Soon after, Kazakhstan and Ukraine followed suit. Vietnam, the world’s third largest exporter of rice, did not impose an export ban but put a moratorium on new export contracts as it assesses domestic stocks. On March 30, Cambodia joined the list of countries announcing limits to exports of certain agricultural products, which will take effect on April 5. This is a particularly painful decision for a country that has been considerably successful in building a market share for rice. More minor exporters, like Serbia, are restricting exports as well. Moreover, these restrictions are coming against a backdrop of high global food prices and rising unemployment worldwide.

We have been here before—and recently. In 2007–08, these same countries and other large exporters instituted some form of export restrictions on staple grains. These restrictions were intended to shield those countries’ consumers from the high prices prevailing in global markets. And they did—to some extent. But they came with massive broader costs: Export restrictions may have added as much as 45 percent to world rice prices and 30 percent to wheat prices during the 2007–08 crisis.

These rising prices plunged at least 100 million people into food insecurity worldwide and came with significant political consequences: Food prices sparked demonstrations and riots in 48 countries in 2007–08. And while prices receded in 2009, they reached historic highs in February 2011—and were once again implicated in political turmoil. High food and fuel prices were among the grievances motivating the demonstrations that led to the various Arab Spring uprisings. Even temporary export bans can have long-lasting effects.

Given rising unemployment and food insecurity, increasing dependence on global food trade, and already high global food prices, the global economy can ill afford these types of self-inflicted market disruptions. Export restrictions are blunt instruments that further exacerbate the problems they were designed to address. Thankfully, governments in major food-exporting economies can take other measures to ensure adequate food supplies, from limiting purchases to reducing taxes on food grains and tapping into domestic emergency stocks to prevent speculative price bubbles from forming and using more targeted transfers—like food stamp programs—to address the needs of the most vulnerable populations. Collectively, governments should continue to advocate for more open, transparent, and well-functioning global agricultural markets.

 

https://www.piie.com/blogs/realtime-economic-issues-watch/wrong-tools-wrong-time-food-export-bans-time-covid-19

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

@mathnerd@Plum 

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/coronavirus/monterey-county-library-uses-3d-printers-to-make-n95-masks/2266756/

“The Monterey County Library system's two 3D printers are being used to produce protective N95 masks while all of the system's branches are closed due to the novel coronavirus outbreak, the county said Thursday.

The two printers are producing the hard plastic masks around the clock to support first responders and medical professionals who are dealing with the pandemic's ongoing surge in cases. Each mask takes just over three hours to make and is designed to be worn multiple times by the same person.

...

Before being repurposed, the printers were generally used to produce supplies for the library system's maker program. Library officials also plan to use them to make doorknob covers that will help prevent the spread of germs and no-sew masks that can hold medically safe air filters.”

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

“Countries like Taiwan [were] very fast to ban the exportation of masks,” Simon Evenett, international trade professor at the University of St. Gallen in Switzerland, said. “And then countries like Korea, likewise.” Evenett is founder of Global Trade Alert, a program to monitor global protectionism, which tallied the accelerating trend of COVID-19 medical export restrictions.

Individual governments have defended decisions to keep medical equipment at home, arguing they must take care of their medical workers and patients first. However, the rules have canceled some deliveries to needy countries. At one point, a French producer of masks entered into an export contract with the British government.

“Then the French government put in place what’s called a requisition order,” Evenett said. “Anything produced in a French factory has to be sold to the French government. So the French company had to call the British health service and say ‘We can’t deliver these millions of masks any more.'”

The Czech Republic also banned exports of masks. According to Evenett, Germany even intercepted a shipment of Chinese-made masks bound for Switzerland.

“They were just trans-shipping through Germany, and they got caught up in this,” he said. “The Swiss went ballistic. And they called in the German ambassador and really gave him a telling off. The last I heard they were still in Germany.”

In all, Evenett found governments placed 46 different export controls on coronavirus-related safety supplies and machines this year. Thirty-three limits were approved in March alone.

Two weeks ago, the European Union agreed to a cease-fire — kind of. It allowed buying and selling of face shields, protective garments, masks and gloves inside the EU but not outside.

“We need to keep in the EU the protective equipment we need,” Ursula von der Leyen, head of the European Commission, said in an online video message March 15. “Such medical goods can only be exported with the explicit authorization of the EU governments.”

The policy, while not an outright ban, in reality means “extra hurdles, extra steps,” Chad Bown, trade scholar and senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, said.

Economic nationalism and hoarding aren’t new, Bown said. Many countries limited exports a decade ago when they faced critical grain shortages. To Bown, these decisions are understandable, yet could lead to unintended consequences.

“I think that’s a very natural first response,” Bown said. “The problem is, it only takes into consideration what I’m doing today. It doesn’t take into consideration the fact that everybody else could do the same back to me. In which case, we’re all ending up worse off.”

Romania stopped exporting ventilator hoses
Every country for itself doesn’t just cut off international shipments; it can gum up the global supply chain for, say, ventilators. At one point in the crisis, Romania stopped exporting hoses for ventilators until manufacturers cried foul. Bown worries that more of this could happen as trade walls go up and countries retaliate.

“The trade war experience of the last two years between the United States and China provide an important lesson for how quickly trade restrictions can escalate once they get started,” Bown said.

The biggest losers in a globalized world? The poorest countries that don’t make anything, Evenett said.

“It’s quite possible these countries are never going to get their hands on high-end medical ventilators. So what we are doing? We are condemning lots of people to a painful and horrible death.”

 

https://www.marketplace.org/2020/03/30/countries-race-to-limit-ban-exports-of-masks-ventilators-other-gear/

export-curbs-st-gallen.jpg

piie-chart-medical-good-list-.jpg

piie-poor-countries-chart.jpg

Edited by Plum
Link to post
Share on other sites

From Google https://www.google.com/covid19/mobility/

“As global communities respond to COVID-19, we've heard from public health officials that the same type of aggregated, anonymized insights we use in products such as Google Maps could be helpful as they make critical decisions to combat COVID-19.

These Community Mobility Reports aim to provide insights into what has changed in response to policies aimed at combating COVID-19. The reports chart movement trends over time by geography, across different categories of places such as retail and recreation, groceries and pharmacies, parks, transit stations, workplaces, and residential.”

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

@mathnerd@Plum 

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/coronavirus/monterey-county-library-uses-3d-printers-to-make-n95-masks/2266756/

“The Monterey County Library system's two 3D printers are being used to produce protective N95 masks while all of the system's branches are closed due to the novel coronavirus outbreak, the county said Thursday.

The two printers are producing the hard plastic masks around the clock to support first responders and medical professionals who are dealing with the pandemic's ongoing surge in cases. Each mask takes just over three hours to make and is designed to be worn multiple times by the same person.

...

Before being repurposed, the printers were generally used to produce supplies for the library system's maker program. Library officials also plan to use them to make doorknob covers that will help prevent the spread of germs and no-sew masks that can hold medically safe air filters.”

One of the magnet extension programs here had 3D printers they sent home with some students so they could make masks. I know there is a maker shop here with multiple 3D printers making masks and a couple of other groups. All hands on deck. Yay! 3D printing!

Edited by Plum
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Plum said:

One of the magnet extension programs here had 3D printers they sent home with some students so they could make masks. I know there is a maker shop here with multiple 3D printers making masks and a couple of other groups. All hands on deck. Yay! 3D printing!

You could probably contact the librarian in charge for the 3D printing files 

Hillary Theyer

Monterey County Free Libraries

(831) 883-7573

theyerha@co.monterey.ca.us.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently, NZ is making N95 masks out of sheep's wool. That did give me a smile this morning. And we are apparently exporting because we have 80million masks in our reserves (surgical and N95) , and are making more than we need. 

Most of the world is dependent on China for its air filter media for all of its masks and we've been making an indigenous supply of filter media based on what we grow here in New Zealand, " said Nick Davenport, chief executive officer of Lanaco. The company's making N95 respirator face masks using specially developed New Zealand sheep wool. 

They've had inquiries from around the globe, including the US, Hong Kong and Australia. With demand so high, they're ramping up production from 400,000 N95 masks a month to 1.5 million.

Edited by lewelma
  • Like 16
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, lewelma said:

Apparently, NZ is making N95 masks out of sheep's wool. That did give me a smile this morning. And we are apparently exporting because we have 80million masks in our reserves (surgical and N95) , and are making more than we need. 

Most of the world is dependent on China for its air filter media for all of its masks and we've been making an indigenous supply of filter media based on what we grow here in New Zealand, " said Nick Davenport, chief executive officer of Lanaco. The company's making N95 respirator face masks using specially developed New Zealand sheep wool. 

They've had inquiries from around the globe, including the US, Hong Kong and Australia. With demand so high, they're ramping up production from 400,000 N95 masks a month to 1.5 million.

 

Sheep wool masks sound lovely, especially for winter. 

I wish USA would get NZ masks.  I don’t trust China ones not to be virus laden. 

 

Maybe a new thing to write my elected representatives about!

Edited by Pen
  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

@TCB@square_25@mathnerd@gardenmom5

https://www.bigcitieshealth.org/press-release-publichealth-leaders-openletter

Nearly 30 of the Nation’s Largest Public Health Departments Launch Ad Campaign Urging People to Stay Home

Big Cities Health Coalition, NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, and Santa Clara County Public Health Department partner to launch awareness-raising campaign in newspapers across the U.S. to help fight coronavirus

 

WASHINGTON, D.C., NEW YORK CITY, SANTA CLARA COUNTY - Today, the Big Cities Health Coalition (BCHC), the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the Santa Clara County Public Health Department, along with 27 other BCHC member health departments—the largest and most urban in the country, who have been hit earliest by the coronavirus pandemic—shared an open letter in newspapers across the country to urge residents to stay at home.

The letter, published in the Chicago Tribune, East Bay Times, El Diario, Houston Chronicle, Mercury News, New York Times, New York Daily News, New York Post, San Francisco Chronicle, Seattle Times (publication date: April 6) and the Wall Street Journal, notes that the United States has not seen a public health threat like this in more than 100 years. It makes clear that the best course of action is a shared commitment to adhering to the preventative measures put forth by public health leaders—washing your hands, social distancing and most importantly: staying at home.

“We know it is hard,” said Dr. Oxiris Barbot, New York City’s health commissioner, and co-author of the letter. “We know that connection to and within our communities are some of the best things about our day-to-day lives but for now staying physically apart is the absolute best thing we can do for our friends, our family and our neighbors. The difference this will make will save lives.”

“When we ask people to stay home, we don’t take it lightly,” said Dr. Sara Cody, Santa Clara County health officer, public health director, and chair of the Big Cities Health Coalition. “We understand many people cannot work from home and are suffering from real impacts to their livelihood. Right now, we all need to reduce the number of people with whom each of us comes in contact. We each have a part in slowing the spread of this virus.”

The letter was signed by health officials from public health departments serving nearly 62 million residents.

“The signers of this letter represent decades of leadership and experience in the field of public health,” said Chrissie Juliano, executive director, Big Cities Health Coalition. “We at BCHC could not be more proud of the work they are doing to protect the health of their communities. Following the stay home directive is crucial. It keeps those that are well, well, keeps resources available for those that are sick and helps us to not overwhelm our health care system.”

Read the full text of the letter here

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

GARLIC?

 

I think someone raised garlic some pages back?

 

It isn’t listed in my best herbal antiviral book as being active against coronavirus or having been helpful for SARS1, afaik.  It at least certainly isn’t listed as an herb to particularly consider for coronavirus. 

Ribivarin pharmaceutical antiviral was apparently also only minimally effective, so something, whether herb or pharmaceutical being “antiviral” does not mean it will be effective against all virus forms. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Contra Costa County, California https://cchealth.org/press-releases/2020/0403-Contra-Costa-Health-Confirms-COVID-19-Outbreak-at-a-Senior-Facility.php

“Contra Costa Health Services today confirms an outbreak of COVID-19 at a facility that houses seniors in Contra Costa County.

At least 27 people have tested positive so far in connection with the outbreak. No deaths have been reported as of Friday morning.”

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, HeighHo said:

 

Vit D has another feature -- fat cells love it and grab it, taking it out of circulation.  This is one of the reasons people are asked to maintain a healthy weight....their Vit D will circulate rather than be stored.

 

Interesting. Thanks, I did not know that! 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Did we already discuss this?

“China Gave Faulty, Contaminated Covid-19 Equipment to Several Countries

List of countries complaining about protective equipment, testing kits, and medical devices from China”

 

  • Like 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Prayers please.  In addition to the other stuff I mentioned above my son's (whom some of you have heard his exploits on here) best friend abruptly is coming to stay with us for an undetermined amount of time.  His mother has mental health issues and his coming home from school just blew up.  His father is recovering from cancer (and is not 100% either in MH) and although he can go there he really wants to stay with us.  They've been thick as thieves since they've both been released from school (mine senior year, him freshman year).  He's a good kid but another kid in our little condo makes seven.

 

 

  • Like 8
  • Confused 1
  • Sad 12
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Pen said:

 

President of US has just invoked his Emergency Defense powers to try to stop 3M from exporting its PPE. (According news flash  up till at least a few minutes ago it has been exporting most of what it produces—and isn’t producing enough even if it were not exporting most) 

Just got news flash a few minutes ago

 

Watch the daily White House briefings which is where all this information is being given.  Yesterday they talked about 3m and other companies who are still exporting and what needs to be do to prioritize who gets what and when and where.  Other countries are sending us supplies.  Russia just sent US a huge planeload of medical supplies.  US already had commitments to sent out supplies to italy and other countries which were honored, instead of stopped.  Lots of data from scientists and the covid task force. 

  • Like 3
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Eliana said:

A local reporter did a summary: https://sccinsight.com/2020/04/01/where-do-we-go-from-here-new-research-and-studies-suggest-next-steps-for-fighting-covid-19/ of several recent papers (includes full text as well)

 

This is interesting! 

(It fits my sense of what is true, but for which I had no study or anything to verify.)  

 

 

Edited by Pen
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Some good news after the deluge of bad news:

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/trial-drug-covid-19-ubc-1.5519348

The University of British Columbia announced Thursday that an international team led by Dr. Josef Penninger has found a potential drug that helps block infection from the virus that causes COVID-19.

 

Edited by mathnerd
  • Like 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...