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From CNA https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/wuhan-virus-coronavirus-study-infected-hospital-staff-12408142

“WASHINGTON: Forty health care workers were infected with the novel coronavirus by patients at a single Wuhan hospital in January, a new study has found, underscoring the risks to those at the frontlines of the growing epidemic.

One patient who was admitted to the surgical department was presumed to have infected 10 health care workers, according to the paper that was authored by doctors at the Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University and published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on Friday (Feb 7).

Seventeen patients who were hospitalised for other reasons also became infected by the coronavirus. A total of 138 patients got the virus in a period spanning Jan 1 to Jan 28, with hospital-associated transmission accounting for 41 per cent of all cases.

The study comes just hours after a Chinese doctor who was punished for raising the alarm about the coronavirus died from the pathogen - sparking an outpouring of grief and anger over a worsening crisis that has now killed more than 630 people.

Li Wenliang, 34, sent out a message about the new coronavirus to colleagues on December 30 in Wuhan but was later among a group of people summoned by police for "rumor-mongering."

He later contracted the disease while treating a patient.

Of the 40 infected health care workers in the JAMA study, 31 worked on general wards, seven in the emergency department, and two in the ICU.

The example of the patient presumed to have infected 10 health workers highlighted the high level of danger within hospitals during the first phase of the epidemic, even though overall it is currently estimated that each patient infects on average 2.2 others.

"If true, then this confirms that some patients are likely to be far more infectious than others, and this poses further difficulties in managing their cases," said Michael Head, a global health expert at the University of Southampton said in a comment to the UK's Science Media Centre.

Medical staff at the epicenter of the virus are overstretched and lack sufficient protective gear, the deputy governor of Hubei province admitted Thursday.”

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21 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

34,377 and 719 deaths

 

From CNA https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/wuhan-virus-death-toll-china-feb-8-12407618

“BEIJING: The number of deaths from China's new coronavirus epidemic jumped to 717 on Saturday (Feb 8), surpassing the toll from the SARS outbreak on the mainland and Hong Kong almost two decades ago.

Another 81 people died from the virus in central Hubei province, where the disease emerged in December, according to the regional health commission.

The toll is now higher than that of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) virus in mainland China and Hong Kong, where nearly 650 people died in 2002-2003.

However, the global toll for SARS, a disease in the same family as the new coronavirus, remains higher at more than 770 deaths.”

 

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4 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

 

Not a comparison, but here's the CDC preliminary burden flu estimates so far for 2019-2020 (10/1/19 through 2/1/20).

Ok, so
.05% of flu victims have died this flu season.  

.2% of coronavirus victims have died (# is much higher actually in Wuhan- 4%)

 

FWIW, since they’ve been mentioned...

SARS: 10% infected died, however the article I read said coronavirus is far more contagious.   
MERS: 34% infected died

 

 

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At least one of every two instances of human-to-human transmission of the new coronavirus is believed to occur while the first patient is not yet showing symptoms, according to an estimate by a group of Japanese university researchers.

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2020/02/255501851d48-half-of-secondary-virus-infections-occur-in-incubation-period-study.html

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From CNA https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/wuhan-coronavirus-world-masks-shortage-who-12406572

“GENEVA: The world is running out of masks and other protective equipment against the novel coronavirus, the World Health Organization chief warned on Friday (Feb 7).

"The world is facing a chronic shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE)," Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told the WHO's executive board in Geneva.

WHO said prices for some items were up to 20 times higher than normal, and Tedros told reporters the problem was being made worse by "inappropriate use" of masks by people who were neither sick nor medical staff.

"There are now depleted stockpiles and backlogs of four to six months. Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient to meet the needs of WHO and our partners," he said, adding: "There is a moral issue here."

After speaking to a supply chain group of producers and distributors on Friday, Tedros praised those companies that have promised to sell only to medical staff.

"There is limited stock of PPE and we need to make sure we get it to the people who need it most in the places that need it most," he said, warning against "stockpiling of PPE in countries and areas where transmission is low".

WHO earlier this week said it had started sending masks, gloves, respirators, protective isolation gowns and test kits to countries requiring assistance.”

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from abc7news https://abc7news.com/health/bay-area-nonprofit-donating-n95-masks-to-china-amid-coronavirus-outbreak/5912088/

“One Bay Area nonprofit is stepping up to donate a stockpile of 1.8 million procedure masks sitting in MedShare's San Leandro warehouse.

After fires and volcanic eruptions around the world, MedShare had them ready to donate to the next big disaster, and they say that disaster is coronavirus. They are also ready to ship 200,000 plastic isolation gowns.
"We originally had a flight out of Oakland but it got rerouted out of Chicago," Eric Talbert, MedShare's Western Regional Director said. "Thanks to folks at the UPS Foundation, they have a direct flight from Chicago into Shanghai. Once they're on the ground in Shanghai we have three distribution partners who will get them into the hands of people who need them. "

The N95 masks are as good as gold and hard to find, plus expensive in China. Recently, N95s are in short supply in many Bay Area stores so MedShare has created a coronavirus donation page and will start collecting for a second shipment of specifically N95s next week.

Trucks filled with supplies will leave over the weekend and by Valentine's Day all of it will be in the hands of healthcare workers and residents in China.

You can find MedShare's donation page here.”

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From SCMP https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/east-asia/article/3049629/coronavirus-three-new-infections-board-cruise-ship-japan

“Coronavirus: total infections on board Diamond Princess cruise ship rises to 64

Three more people on a cruise ship quarantined in Yokohama, Japan, have tested positive for the new coronavirus, the health ministry said on Saturday, bringing the total number of infections form the vessel to 64.

The three – two Americans and one Chinese – have already been transferred to medical facilities and hospitalised, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare said.

The new cases came a day after Japan on Friday confirmed 41 people tested positive for the virus, as thousands of passengers remained confined to their cabins, only allowed on deck briefly for fresh air.

Japanese authorities have so far tested about 280 people on board the Diamond Princess, which was placed on a two-week quarantine after a former passenger, who disembarked in Hong Kong last month, was diagnosed with the coronavirus.

About 3,700 people are on board the Diamond Princess, which usually has a crew of 1,100 and a passenger capacity of 2,670.

The Princess Cruise website describes the ship as “your home away from home” and it will remain so for most passengers at least until February 19. The quarantine period could be extended if necessary, a Japanese government official said.

One of those found infected is in serious condition. Many on board are elderly and at greater risk of developing complications from the virus.

Mike Ryan, the World Health Organisation’s top emergency expert, said new cases would push back the quarantine.

“We need to find a way to break that vicious cycle and find a way of organising the patients on board in a way that we can get people off the ship in due course, Ryan said.

On board, passengers were finding out about the new infections from the internet before they were announced on the ship, said a Hong Kong man, who declined to be identified.

Ashley Rhodes-Courter, an American whose parents were on the ship, said she hoped US officials would help get them off.”

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From CNA https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/wuhan-virus-us-japan-die-coronavirus-china-12410562

“08 Feb 2020 01:50PM

Asia

BEIJING: A US citizen who was diagnosed with the novel coronavirus and another Japanese man suspected to have the infection have both died in Wuhan. 

"We can confirm that a 60-year-old US citizen diagnosed with coronavirus died at a hospital in Wuhan, China, on Feb 6," an embassy spokesman told AFP on Saturday (Feb 8), without specifying the person's gender.

"We offer the sincerest condolences to the family for their loss," the spokesman said, adding that no further comment would be made out of respect for the family's privacy.

The Japanese foreign ministry in a statement on Saturday also said that one of its citizens with a suspected coronavirus infection has died in a hospital in the Chinese city. 

The man in his 60s had been hospitalised due to severe pneumonia and the hospital reported his death to the Japanese embassy in China, the ministry said in a statement.

Chinese medical authorities said the man was highly likely to have been infected with the new coronavirus but "it is difficult to make a definitive judgment", the statement said.

His cause of death was given as viral pneumonia, it added.”

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Five new cases in France.  My French language ability is pretty limited but I think either one or all five are British nationals, possibly a tour group and the virus was most likely contracted by one of them in Singapore.  
Arab news Is reporting Kuwait now have a travel warning for Singapore 

edited with English language source

https://news.sky.com/story/coronavirus-global-death-toll-reaches-719-after-81-new-fatalities-in-hubei-11928799

It looks like the first case was in Singapore from 20-23 of Jan.  He was in France from 24th for four days.  Two apartments at the ski chalet where he stayed are being examined.

Edited by Ausmumof3
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This study seems to indicate that coronaviruses in general can persist on surfaces for up to 9 days.  Disinfectant process can work with hydrogen peroxide ethanol or sodium hypochlorite 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195670120300463

I can’t access the full study but any thoughts on this?  May explain the disinfectant truck videos etc

Edited by Ausmumof3
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Shanghai warns of aerosol infection

Shanghai’s health commission added aerosol transmission the list of ways of contracting the coronavirus. 
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3049623/coronavirus-hubei-province-reports-81-new-deaths-and-2841

concerning if true.  The approach to contact tracing and quarantine here as I understand it has been based on droplet or contact infection not aerosol infection.  I don’t fully understand the ins and outs of it though.

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6 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Shanghai warns of aerosol infection

Shanghai’s health commission added aerosol transmission the list of ways of contracting the coronavirus. 
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3049623/coronavirus-hubei-province-reports-81-new-deaths-and-2841

concerning if true.  The approach to contact tracing and quarantine here as I understand it has been based on droplet or contact infection not aerosol infection.  I don’t fully understand the ins and outs of it though.

 

Aerosol transmission would be Very Very Bad!!!  

I ‘ll read the links in your last few posts soon.

 

Here’s a link to a new roundup of the situation I saw:

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

 

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47 minutes ago, Ausmumof3 said:

This study seems to indicate that coronaviruses in general can persist on surfaces for up to 9 days.  Disinfectant process can work with hydrogen peroxide ethanol or sodium hypochlorite 

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195670120300463

I can’t access the full study but any thoughts on this?  May explain the disinfectant truck videos etc

 

The combination of suspected aerosol transmission and length of time persisting on surfaces may explain both the haz mat type clothing and the disinfection trucks and sprayers

That’s significantly longer than I was thinking it would likely persist on surfaces

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My understanding is that coronavirus tends to mutate, so it could be becoming aerosol transmissible in some areas, but not others.  It could make it hard as people in one place might be correctly saying it can transmit by aerosol and people elsewhere could be saying it cannot.

that could easily become a way to end up behind the 8 ball on world wide pandemic level.

The warning from a microbiologist that Hong Kong already has local spread and is too late in closing borders is also concerning.  

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I’ve been wanting to make my own tincture(s) of some local growing antimicrobial herbal(s).  It always seems like something else is more pressing.  Maybe this will now be my impetus to do it.  

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2 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

but don't you count the number who have contracted the virus not how many have recovered when calculating the death rate? 

 

We don't yet know if the people who are sick will die or not, so I don't think that would be as accurate.

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1 minute ago, PrincessMommy said:

but don't you count the number who have contracted the virus not how many have recovered when calculating the death rate? 

 

because this virus takes quite a long time to go through the whole cycle (onset to death, in fatal cases, is over 20 days), for a while it's hard to say exactly how many people of the ones that still have it will eventually die.  so a recovery rate is in some ways more accurate, just because it takes so darned long and we're still in the first month of serious consideration of the thing.

On the other hand, there are almost certainly many many many more cases that recover without being counted in the "recovery" stats because they never got sick enough to go to the hospital, just stayed at home and eventually got through it.

On the other other hand, there are also certainly a lot of people dying of pneumonia in Wuhan without being counted in either the infected rate or the death rate, so overall numbers are just very hard to come by.  This is why on the whole I'm only paying serious attention for now to numbers outside Wuhan and even to some degree outside China; I largely trust the US government to be capable of and responsible for reporting these things accurately.  There's not as much data but it's better data.

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Although I should point out that those numbers probably won't translate to any country other than China, for three reasons:

  1. There is a higher percentage of elderly people there because of the one-child policy.
  2. Air pollution.  We know many people who travel there for work, and to quote DH, "I don't know anyone who went there who didn't feel sick for at least two weeks afterwards."
  3. Higher smoking rates.
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Also the patients here (in the USA) have been treated with several different kinds of antivirals that I'm sure aren't available in China, at least not at the levels they would need.

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5 minutes ago, Katy said:

Although I should point out that those numbers probably won't translate to any country other than China, for three reasons:

  1. There is a higher percentage of elderly people there because of the one-child policy.
  2. Air pollution.  We know many people who travel there for work, and to quote DH, "I don't know anyone who went there who didn't feel sick for at least two weeks afterwards."
  3. Higher smoking rates.

 

Right, that's part of it too.  I'm primarily concerned, to be completely frank, about my chances in my own community.  For those purposes, the numbers out of Wuhan are not as relevant at this time (although they do suggest something about what happens if it gets out of control, even in a place with fewer Asians, lower smoking rates, and somewhat less popultion density).

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I’d like to know for some place like Hong Kong that has enough cases to be significant, but few enough to be kept track of, what the outcome ends up being for all 26 initial cases.  So far report is one dead no recovered.

Also important will be how much permanent disability results, not just death statistic.  

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2 minutes ago, Pen said:

I’d like to know for some place like Hong Kong that has enough cases to be significant, but few enough to be kept track of, what the outcome ends up being for all 26 initial cases.  So far report is one dead no recovered.

Also important will be how much permanent disability results, not just death statistic.  

 

That's true.  Or even not just permanent disability, but how many people die of any reason in the next year because their immune system was so weakened by this.

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21 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

but don't you count the number who have contracted the virus not how many have recovered when calculating the death rate? 

It’s frustrating because the infection rate is growing while the recovery rate is comparatively slow.  In the meantime, everyone could be looked at as Schrödinger’s cat.

We can get some optimism from the rates outside of the epicenter, but then we also have to consider that the epicenter’s resources are overwhelmed. If everybody else’s remain... not overwhelmed, great.  If they do become overwhelmed, then one might expect the rates to change.

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From CNA https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/wuhan-coronavirus-moh-new-cases-taxi-driver-private-hire-12411656

“SINGAPORE: Singapore confirmed seven new cases of novel coronavirus on Saturday (Feb 8), including a taxi driver and a private-hire car driver, taking the country's tally to 40.

Of the 40 confirmed cases, four are in critical condition, with one requiring additional oxygen support. Two have been discharged, said the Ministry of Health (MOH) in a press release.

In addition to a taxi driver and a private-hire driver, the new cases include two employees of Yong Thai Hang, the health products shop linked to a local transmission cluster, and another two who attended a business meeting at Grand Hyatt hotel linked to a cluster of cases. 

All seven patients have not travelled to China recently, said the ministry.”

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Has anyone following this thread been to Singapore?  Do taxis there have glass dividers, or has everyone who's been in the cab in the past 10 days been exposed?

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16 minutes ago, Katy said:

Has anyone following this thread been to Singapore?  Do taxis there have glass dividers, or has everyone who's been in the cab in the past 10 days been exposed?

No dividers in taxis. No mask for taxi drivers too as mask are out of stock or hyper expensive. The govt rationed out four free mask per household which is obviously not enough.

“The Government will give every household a pack of four masks. Mask collection will start at designated RC Centres and CCs from 2pm on Saturday, 1 Feb to Sunday, 9 Feb 2020.

...

Please remember that the masks are for those who are sick. There is no need to wear a mask if you are well.” https://www.gov.sg/article/where-to-collect-the-masks-for-your-household

 

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3 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

Shanghai warns of aerosol infection

Shanghai’s health commission added aerosol transmission the list of ways of contracting the coronavirus. 
https://www.scmp.com/news/china/society/article/3049623/coronavirus-hubei-province-reports-81-new-deaths-and-2841

concerning if true.  The approach to contact tracing and quarantine here as I understand it has been based on droplet or contact infection not aerosol infection.  I don’t fully understand the ins and outs of it though.

 

This is something that would make me considerably more worried. 

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57 minutes ago, Arcadia said:

From CNA https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/singapore/wuhan-coronavirus-moh-new-cases-taxi-driver-private-hire-12411656

“SINGAPORE: Singapore confirmed seven new cases of novel coronavirus on Saturday (Feb 8), including a taxi driver and a private-hire car driver, taking the country's tally to 40.

Of the 40 confirmed cases, four are in critical condition, with one requiring additional oxygen support. Two have been discharged, said the Ministry of Health (MOH) in a press release.

In addition to a taxi driver and a private-hire driver, the new cases include two employees of Yong Thai Hang, the health products shop linked to a local transmission cluster, and another two who attended a business meeting at Grand Hyatt hotel linked to a cluster of cases. 

All seven patients have not travelled to China recently, said the ministry.”

 

The percent in critical condition is worrisome.

 

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52 minutes ago, Katy said:

Has anyone following this thread been to Singapore?  Do taxis there have glass dividers, or has everyone who's been in the cab in the past 10 days been exposed?

 

The drivers very likely got sick from passengers  I would guess.  So droplets probably on passenger seats and surfaces.

 

 

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The Chinese have ordered a huge amount of Decon Seven (D7), a hydrogen peroxide-based viral disinfectant, which they are spraying all over the city -- on buildings, streets, bus stops, etc. D7 is made here in the US by Decon7 Systems. It can kill viruses for up to eight hours. The company's founder Joe Drake said:

Quote

“This is off the charts,” Drake said by telephone. “They want everything we can manufacture.”

 

In response, the company has stepped up production from their normal three facilities adding three more -- six facilities total.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-health-disinfectants/u-s-disinfectant-maker-boosts-output-as-china-hospitals-battle-virus-idUSKBN1ZX0J9

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Anti-virals and other drugs are being prescribed to treat the pneumonia. Ideally, they'd be given around the time they begin to see the atypical viral pneumonia. They will often give antibiotics as well because viral pneumonia can lead to bacterial pneumonia.

The antibody treatments are really interesting. Russia is working on something supposedly for ncov but so is this company, Regeneron, in the US. This is not an anti-viral but antibodies. It would still take time to produce the meds but at some point the meds could be used to treat ncov. And every time the company works on these problems, they learn more, which can bode well for future viral outbreaks.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/05/in-the-race-to-develop-a-coronavirus-treatment-regeneron-thinks-it-has-the-inside-track/

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@Pen

This Straits Times article is very long and I haven’t finish reading. Quoted part might answer your question https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/reporters-notebook-life-and-death-in-a-wuhan-coronavirus-icu

“Fatality rate for acute patients is 4 per cent to 5 per cent; 3 weeks determine life and death

Caixin: Based on your clinical experience, what's the disease progression of the new coronavirus?

Peng: Lately I've been spending the daytime seeing patients in the ICU, then doing some research in the evenings. I just wrote a thesis. I drew on data from 138 cases that South Central Hospital had from Jan 7 to Jan 28 and attempted to summarise some patterns of the novel coronavirus.

A lot of viruses will die off on their own after a certain amount of time. We call these self-limited diseases.

I've observed that the breakout period of the novel coronavirus tends to be three weeks, from the onset of symptoms to developing difficulties breathing. Basically going from mild to severe symptoms takes about a week. There are all sorts of mild symptoms: feebleness, shortness of breath, some people have fevers, some don't. Based on studies of our 138 cases, the most common symptoms in the first stage are fever (98.6 per cent of cases), feebleness (69.6 per cent), cough (59.4 per cent), muscle pains (34.8 per cent), difficulties breathing (31.2%), while less common symptoms include headaches, dizziness, stomach pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting.

But some patients who enter the second week will suddenly get worse. At this stage, people should go to the hospital. The elderly with underlying conditions may develop complications; some may need machine-assisted respiration. When the body's other organs start to fail, that's when it becomes severe, while those with strong immune systems see their symptoms decrease in severity at this stage and gradually recover. So the second week is what determines whether the illness becomes critical.

The third week determines whether critical illness leads to death. Some in critical condition who receive treatment can raise their level of lymphocytes, a type of white blood cell, and see an improvement in their immune systems, and have been brought back, so to speak. But those whose lymphocyte numbers continue to decline, those whose immune systems are destroyed in the end, experience multiple organ failure and die.

For most, the illness is over in two weeks, whereas for those for whom the illness becomes severe, if they can survive three weeks, they're good. Those that can't will die in three weeks.

Caixin: Will you please give more details on clinical research? What percentage of cases would develop from mild conditions to severe conditions? What percentage of serious cases would develop into life-threatening cases? What is the mortality rate?

Peng: Based on my clinical observations, this disease is highly contagious, but the mortality rate is low. Those that progressed into the life-threatening stage often occurred in the elderly already with chronic diseases.

As of Jan 28, of 138 cases, 36 were in the ICU, 28 recovered, five died. That is to say, the mortality rate of patients with severe conditions was 3.6 per cent. Yesterday (Feb 3), another patient died, bringing the mortality rate to 4.3 per cent. Given patients in the ICU, it is likely to have more deaths. The mortality rate is also likely to edge up but not significantly.

Those hospitalised tend to have severe or life-threatening conditions. Patients with slight symptoms are placed in quarantine at home. We have not gathered data on the percentage of cases that progress from slight symptoms to serious symptoms. If a patient goes from serious conditions to life-threatening conditions, the patient will be sent to the ICU. Among 138 patients, 36 were transferred to the ICU, representing 26 per cent of all patients.

The percentage of deaths among life-threatening cases is about 15 per cent. The mean period to go from slight conditions to life-threatening conditions is about 10 days. Twenty-eight patients recovered and were discharged. Right now, the recovery rate is 20.3 per cent, while other patients remain hospitalised.

It is notable that 12 cases were linked to South China Seafood Market; 57 were infected while being hospitalised, including 17 patients already hospitalised in other departments; and 40 medical staff, among 138 cases (as of Jan 28). That demonstrates that a hospital is a high-risk zone and appropriate protection must be taken.”

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1 hour ago, BeachGal said:

Anti-virals and other drugs are being prescribed to treat the pneumonia. Ideally, they'd be given around the time they begin to see the atypical viral pneumonia. They will often give antibiotics as well because viral pneumonia can lead to bacterial pneumonia.

The antibody treatments are really interesting. Russia is working on something supposedly for ncov but so is this company, Regeneron, in the US. This is not an anti-viral but antibodies. It would still take time to produce the meds but at some point the meds could be used to treat ncov. And every time the company works on these problems, they learn more, which can bode well for future viral outbreaks.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/02/05/in-the-race-to-develop-a-coronavirus-treatment-regeneron-thinks-it-has-the-inside-track/

 

It isn't just that.  Antibiotics are also a strong anti-inflammatory, which is why people think they get better from taking them when they've had a lingering cold, or why doctors will often prescribe them for any sort of viral infection that suddenly turned worse (after 2 weeks).  Yes, some people also have bacterial infections or mycoplasma, but many start feeling better because of the anti-inflammatory effects, not because of secondary infections.

Edited by Katy
stupid autocorrect
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3 hours ago, Katy said:

 

It isn't just that.  Antibiotics are also a strong anti-inflammatory, which is why people think they get better from taking them when they've had a lingering cold, or why doctors will often prescribe them for any sort of viral infection that suddenly turned worse (after 2 weeks).  Yes, some people also have bacterial infections or mycoplasma, but many start feeling better because of the anti-inflammatory effects, not because of secondary infections.

 

In nCoV patients who develop viral pneumonia, the lungs are initially damaged by the virus causing them to shed a layer of cells which then allows bacteria to attack the lungs. So first the virus attacks, then bacteria. My understanding is that they are primarily prescribing antibiotics for preventing bacterial infections. Do you have a link to something where they discuss prescribing antibiotics for nCoV as primarily anti-inflammatories? I’m curious how this would affect nCoV’s progression.

In preparation for pandemics, the NIH recommends stockpiling antibiotics to treat bacterial infections that follow viral infections. The Spanish Flu, for example, was caused by a virus, but most deaths were the result of bacterial infections that followed after. I’ve always thought the primary purpose of prescribing antibiotics was for bacterial infection. I’ll have to read up on the anti-inflammatory angle.

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This came up on my facebook feed.  I'm not sure if it is from a reliable source or not, but is scary if its true.

 

In case you missed it, yesterday, Federal Agents arrested Dr. Charles Lieber, chair of Harvard University's Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, with lying to the Department of Defense about secret monthly payments of $50,000.00 paid by China and receipt of millions more to help set up a chemical/biological “Research” laboratory in China. Also arrested were two Chinese “Students” working as research assistants, one of whom was actually a lieutenant in the Chinese Army, the other captured at Logan Airport as he tried to catch a flight to China - smuggling 21 vials of “Sensitive Biological Samples” according to the FBI.

....The research lab the good professor had helped set up? It’s located at the Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan China is ground zero to the potentially global pandemic known as the “Coronavirus”which is both spreading rapidly and killing people.

 

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15 minutes ago, Excelsior! Academy said:

This came up on my facebook feed.  I'm not sure if it is from a reliable source or not, but is scary if its true.

 

In case you missed it, yesterday, Federal Agents arrested Dr. Charles Lieber, chair of Harvard University's Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, with lying to the Department of Defense about secret monthly payments of $50,000.00 paid by China and receipt of millions more to help set up a chemical/biological “Research” laboratory in China. Also arrested were two Chinese “Students” working as research assistants, one of whom was actually a lieutenant in the Chinese Army, the other captured at Logan Airport as he tried to catch a flight to China - smuggling 21 vials of “Sensitive Biological Samples” according to the FBI.

....The research lab the good professor had helped set up? It’s located at the Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan China is ground zero to the potentially global pandemic known as the “Coronavirus”which is both spreading rapidly and killing people.

 

Yes, this is true. I have been seeing other news stories about it.

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22 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

 

In nCoV patients who develop viral pneumonia, the lungs are initially damaged by the virus causing them to shed a layer of cells which then allows bacteria to attack the lungs. So first the virus attacks, then bacteria. My understanding is that they are primarily prescribing antibiotics for preventing bacterial infections. Do you have a link to something where they discuss prescribing antibiotics for nCoV as primarily anti-inflammatories? I’m curious how this would affect nCoV’s progression.

In preparation for pandemics, the NIH recommends stockpiling antibiotics to treat bacterial infections that follow viral infections. The Spanish Flu, for example, was caused by a virus, but most deaths were the result of bacterial infections that followed after. I’ve always thought the primary purpose of prescribing antibiotics was for bacterial infection. I’ll have to read up on the anti-inflammatory angle.

 

I’ve had two kids that deal with asthma and repeated bouts of pneumonia. A bad viral cold can spiral out of control and after a certain amount of time, the doctor has given them antibiotics to combat any bacteria likely to establish itself in the lower lungs. I also have never heard of an anti inflammatory effect of abx but that is interesting. 

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5 minutes ago, Selkie said:

Yes, this is true. I have been seeing other news stories about it.

 

This was news back on Jan 29? I am surprised it didn’t get a bigger headline - if it did, I missed it. 

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24 minutes ago, Excelsior! Academy said:

This came up on my facebook feed.  I'm not sure if it is from a reliable source or not, but is scary if its true.

 

In case you missed it, yesterday, Federal Agents arrested Dr. Charles Lieber, chair of Harvard University's Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, with lying to the Department of Defense about secret monthly payments of $50,000.00 paid by China and receipt of millions more to help set up a chemical/biological “Research” laboratory in China. Also arrested were two Chinese “Students” working as research assistants, one of whom was actually a lieutenant in the Chinese Army, the other captured at Logan Airport as he tried to catch a flight to China - smuggling 21 vials of “Sensitive Biological Samples” according to the FBI.

....The research lab the good professor had helped set up? It’s located at the Wuhan University of Technology. Wuhan China is ground zero to the potentially global pandemic known as the “Coronavirus”which is both spreading rapidly and killing people.

 

 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/harvards-chemistry-chair-charged-on-alleged-undisclosed-ties-to-china-11580228768

I think this is about intelligence gathering and that the university's location is a coincidence.

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From BBC https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-51431087

“The number of coronavirus deaths has overtaken that of the Sars epidemic in 2003.

In China's Hubei province alone, the epicentre of the latest outbreak, the death toll now is put at 780 by regional health officials. 

All but one of the overall total of 803 deaths have so far been in mainland China and Hong Kong.

In 2003, 774 people were killed by Sars (severe acute respiratory syndrome) in more than two dozen countries.”

 

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on the ground videos coming from Wuhan seem to have pretty much disappeared the last two days.

at least one citizen journalist seems to have been taken forcibly into quarantine in spite of being in good health according to friends.

https://edition.cnn.com/asia/live-news/coronavirus-outbreak-02-08-20-intl-hnk/h_7db7078e5b48df6fe066f47a9b8182d8

 

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 I felt sick when I heard this story on the local news last night:   https://www.kiro7.com/home/shoreline-location-could-be-possible-quarantine-site-travelers-exposed-coronavirus/KG3RHQCF7JARTHFVTPJDSPHEF4/

The health department people changed their minds about where to locate a quarantine site for travelers who may have been exposed to the virus.  Now they've decided to use RV's instead of a dormitory, and they've parked them right next to a residential facility for people with developmental and intellectual disabilities!   

 

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3 - 5 RVs may not be anywhere near enough quarantine room if a bunch of potential cases arrive—but if the coronavirus is a regular virus that transmits via droplets (not aerosol) and is not weaponized, and given the large grounds of the facility, that should be safe for people who seem well and nonetheless need to do their 14 (or whatever) days after arrival.  And safe for nearby residents. 

Fircrest, looking it up, appears to be an 85 acre facility which in past times managed tuberculosis patients.  It is probably quite well suited as a temporary quarantine location. With 85 acres, There’s probably abundant room for people from both the quarantine area and the residential school to get outdoors time without infecting anyone new.  

People who live near hospitals and urgent care centers where sick people may go, may be much closer — and thus probably more at risk.

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