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1 hour ago, Bootsie said:

There is also evidence that people respond to risk very differently, depending on the risks that they have faced previously.  Many of these older people remember outbreaks of polio, TB, and measles.  Many experienced war.  Not only do they value autonomy, many fear isolation.  To them, missing out on hearing the laughter of a child, attending the memorial service of a dear friend, or other activities is a miserable experience and the thought of it is depressing.  Their mental and emotional health is also important.

I agree with this.

I was surprised that up to a few days ago, the general feeling of my international adoption group was very open to travel - even those whose political / ideological mates were firmly in the freak-out camp.  Then I realized that all these people have done a lot more international travel than the average American - and to locations many Americans would consider risky.  So I guess their risk calculation is just different.  (FTR, before anyone has a cow, I was not in the "let's travel" camp myself.)

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2 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

They are saying here that a cough and fever are big indicators but not so much a runny nose.

 

I don't know who "they" is, but "they" are wrong.  Multiple contact tracing studies from countries other than China have come out in the past few days that have shown those with no symptoms or very minimal symptoms like sniffles and a sore throat not only have Covid 19, they also are MORE contagious than people with severe symptoms like pneumonia.  Articles about these studies have been linked right in this thread.  Assume EVERYONE has it, whether they have symptoms or not.

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https://www.peacecorps.gov/news/library/peace-corps-announces-suspension-volunteer-activities-evacuations-due-covid-19/
“Peace Corps announces suspension of Volunteer activities, evacuations due to COVID-19

It is against this backdrop that I have made the difficult decision to temporarily suspend all Peace Corps operations globally and evacuate all of our Volunteers. As COVID-19 continues to spread and international travel becomes more and more challenging by the day, we are acting now to safeguard your well-being and prevent a situation where Volunteers are unable to leave their host countries.

Evacuations are difficult, emotionally draining experiences for everyone involved. We are here for you, and we will do all that we can to keep you informed and up to date on the latest developments. Ensuring your health, safety and security is the highest priority of the Peace Corps. I want to stress that Headquarters remains open under its own Continuity of Operations Plan, and agency personnel are working 24/7 to support you and our staff overseas.

I also want to assure you and our host country partners that these evacuations represent the temporary suspension of Volunteer activities. We are not closing posts, and we will be ready to return to normal operations when conditions permit. Importantly, our host country staff will remain in their current positions. They play a critical role in every element of the Peace Corps mission, especially in a time of crisis.

Look for more information from your Country Director in the hours ahead. I deeply appreciate your patience and understanding as we work through these logistically challenging operations.”

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13 hours ago, Ausmumof3 said:

I actually feel like for some kids this is going to feel like a defining thing in the way that Sep 11 was for us 

 

It's going to be a defining thing for ME.

We deliberately played Pandemic this weekend. Just so the kids could look back at playing Pandemic during Pandemic 2020.

I'm trying to deliberately make memories.

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https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/health-environment/article/3075421/coronavirus-salt-water-spray-infects-46-church-goers
“A church in South Korea sprayed salt water inside the mouths of followers out of a false belief it would help prevent the spread of the coronavirus, but by using the same spray bottle without disinfecting the nozzle, it resulted in 46 church-goers infected, authorities said on Monday.

Video images from the River of Grace Community Church in Gyeonggi Province, south of Seoul, show a church official sticking the nozzle of a spray bottle deep into the mouth of one follower after another, during a prayer gathering attended by some 100 followers on March 1 and March 8. Those infected include the pastor and his wife.”

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6 hours ago, lewelma said:

Just got this from a friend. It is from an internal memo from a hospital here in NZ. 

Virus Detection: 
The simplest way to distinguish Coronavirus from a Common Cold is that the COVID-19 infection does not cause a cold nose or cough with cold, but it does create a dry and rough cough.

The virus is typically first installed in the throat causing inflammation and a feeling of dryness. This symptom can last between 3 and 4 days.

 

The virus typically then travels through the moisture present in the airways, goes down to the trachea and installs in the lungs, causing pneumonia that lasts about 5 or 6 days.

 

Pneumonia manifests with a high fever and difficulty breathing. The Common Cold is not accompanied, but there may be a choking sensation. In this case, the doctor should be called immediately.

 

Experts suggest doing this simple verification every morning: Breathe in deeply and hold your breath for 10 seconds.  If this can be done without coughing, without difficulty, this shows that there is no fibrosis in the lungs, indicating the absence of infection.  It is recommended to do this control every morning to help detect infection.

Prevention:
The virus hates heat and dies if it is exposed to temperatures greater than 80°F (27°C). Therefore hot drinks such as infusions, broths or simply hot water should be consumed abundantly during the day.

 These hot liquids kill the virus and are easy to ingest.
Avoid drinking ice water or drinks with ice cubes. 
Ensure that your mouth and throat are always wet, never DRY. You should drink a sip of water at least every 15 minutes. WHY?  Even when the virus enters water or other liquids through the mouth, it will get flushed through the oesophagus directly into the stomach where gastric acids destroy the virus. If there is not enough water, the virus can pass into the trachea and from there to the lungs, where it is very dangerous.

 

For those who can, sunbathe. The Sun's UV rays kill the virus and the vitamin D is good for you.  

 

The Coronavirus has a large size (diameter of 400-500 nanometers) so face masks can stop it, no special face masks are needed in daily life.

 

If an infected person sneezes near us, stay 10 feet (3.3 meters) away to allow the virus fall to the ground and prevent it from falling on you.

 

When the virus is on hard surfaces, it survives about 12 hours, therefore when hard surfaces such as doors, appliances, railings, etc. are touched, hands should be washed thoroughly and/or disinfected with alcoholic gel

 

The virus can live nested in clothes and tissues between 6 and 12 hours. Common detergents can kill it. Things that cannot be washed should be exposed to the Sun and the virus will die.

 

The transmission of the virus usually occurs by direct infection, touching fabrics, tissues or materials on which the virus is present. 

 

Washing your hands is essential.

 

The virus survives on our hands for only about 10 minutes. In that time many things can happen, rubbing the eyes, touching the nose or lips. This allows the virus to enter your throat. Therefore, for your good and the good of all, wash your hands very often and disinfect them.

 

 

You can gargle with disinfectant solutions (i.e. Listerine or Hydrogen Peroxide) that eliminate or minimize the amount of virus that can enter the throat. Doing so removes the virus before it goes down to the trachea and then to the lungs.

 

Disinfect things touched often: cellphone, keyboard, mouse, car steering wheel, door handles, etc

 

This is not true afaik.  

One of the hoax releases giving bogus and possibly very dangerous information that has been circulating.  

Not every word and bit is necessarily false, but much is false or at least dangerously misleading.   Certainly it is good to wash hands often, but I have seen no credible proof that virus only survives on hands 10 minutes.  It survives on most surfaces far longer— including on copper 4 hours (according to a real Princeton study) and copper tends to be antimicrobial. 

 

https://www.factcheck.org/2020/03/viral-social-media-posts-offer-false-coronavirus-tips/

IMO, you should tell your friend too.  Probably the NZ hospital did not actually put that out.  But if they did, they were probably duped themselves. Around here it is attributed to coming from a Stanford internal memo. 

Some quotes: From the fact-check.org:

 

 

“Krys Johnson, an assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at Temple University, who called the posts “deeply troubling because they make incorrect and dangerous claims.” She recommended people consult the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the World Health Organization, before spreading purported health advice.

Here are some of the claims from the posts, and why they’re inaccurate:

Claim: Take a deep breath and hold your breath for more than 10 seconds. If you complete it successfully without coughing, without discomfort, stiffness or tightness, etc., it proves there is no Fibrosis in the lungs, basically indicates no infection.”

Facts: There’s no evidence to suggest this is a valid test for COVID-19. What’s more: “We know that people infected with coronavirus show symptoms within 14 days and that this virus can lead to severe complications,” Johnson told us via email, “but those are acute respiratory distress (not being able to breathe) and septic shock (the virus infecting your bloodstream), not fibrosis, as mentioned here.”

The CDC recommends seeking medical advice by phone if you develop the main symptoms of COVID-19 — fever, cough and shortness of breath — and have been in contact with someone who has the disease, or have recently traveled to an area experiencing a spread of the virus.”

[ @Pen comment: given community spread even if this CDC recommendation is still valid, I think we need to realize we may have CV even without known contact or travel.]

“Claim: If you have a runny nose and sputum, you have a common cold … Coronavirus pneumonia is a dry cough with no runny nose.”

Facts: While the most common symptoms of COVID-19 are “fever, tiredness, and dry cough,” according to WHO, some patients do have “aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea.” Some who are infected don’t show any symptoms. Also, a WHO reportsaid that, based on an examination of more than 55,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases, 33% had sputum (phlegm) production.”

 

Etc 

 

Edited by Pen
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I live in a complex of four buildings that take up almost an entire city block. Each building is seven stories tall. Our young janitor was diagnosed with Covid last week. His cousin, our complex’s engineer, might also have it, too. They are all over the buildings. We have shared laundry rooms and communal trash cans. Also, small elevators. It’s likely spread.

The residents are a hodge podge of people — a lot of retirees, professors at the university across the street, young doctors, a few mentally disabled but high functioning individuals. The older people are not at all meandering about. They are hunkered in and only leaving to get mail. The younger ones are out, probably to go work.

My youngest son works as a trader and so for now, he must go in to work. Pits are closed but etrading is still going on. So I’ve been in and out of the city helping him out because his days have been nuts.

I think the cases will escalate dramatically this week but won’t be definitive because the ability to test was massively messed up.

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29 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

 

It's going to be a defining thing for ME.

We deliberately played Pandemic this weekend. Just so the kids could look back at playing Pandemic during Pandemic 2020.

I'm trying to deliberately make memories.

We play games constantly and that is the one game we are all refusing to play! 

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3 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

We play games constantly and that is the one game we are all refusing to play! 

 

We play with house rules that mean we are much more likely to win (though we keep pushing them back and making it harder to make it more challenging). We make sure the kids understand we are playing with house rules because the default game is VERY hard to win.

 

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11 hours ago, EmilyGF said:

Vogue's take on it is that Baby Boomers are in denial over being old

They are talking about the older half of Baby Boomers, not us younger ones.  Dh and I are tailend and we and others are age are not in denial and haven't been.  For one thing, just about everyone in our age group is still working except for some of the women who have retired but have husbands still working.

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7 hours ago, StellaM said:

 

French doctors were warning (The Guardian, 14/03) that cortisone and other anti-inflammatories may worsen Covid19 symptoms. I decided to switch to paracetemol for fever relief, just because it's something small I could easily do without great inconvenience or expense. 

ANd ibuprofen also increases chances of heart attack so there is that too.

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Chick-fil-A 
https://www.chick-fil-a.com/corona-virus

“March 15th COVID-19 Update: Temporary Closure of Dining Room Seating

Our highest priority continues to be the health and well-being of everyone who comes into our restaurants. As we navigate the evolving impact of coronavirus on our communities, we are temporarily closing our dining room seating to help limit person-to-person contact. Some of our restaurants may only offer service through our drive-thrus, while others may be able to offer takeout, delivery or mobile order options. Thanks for your patience. We know these are challenging times, but we’ll continue to do our best to serve you.”

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3 hours ago, Eliana said:

There's a difference between a choice that only impacts your own odds of a longer life and one that contributes to killing others because one refuses to face the truth of a situation. 

Oh for sure! I still want them to behave like the rest of us to limit the spread. I was more thinking of all the people who have posted that they’re no longer going to visit the elderly in their lives. I think it’s cruel to force total isolation if they’re not asking for that. 

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12 hours ago, sassenach said:

Older people, in general, do not value safety as much as younger people. They value autonomy, agency, routine, and family. They would rather live as they choose than live longer. 
 

I think we should respect that their decisions and priorities are different than what we desire for them. This is THE issue in elder care in general. Safety vs autonomy. 

I just don't see this in my family at least -- yes they valued autonomy and agency, but they also don't want to die. My dad is the biggest germaphobe and hypochrondriac, who says he's never felt healthier or happier than he has in his 70's.  But he hasn't stopped eating out at restaurants or shopping at Target.  He has also gotten more rigid in his thinking over time.  He washes his hands non stop but doesn't wonder whether the people at all of his diners he loves are following good sanitary practices in preparing food or staying home if they have a cough.  He just hadn't thought about that.  

 

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One huge concern about this virus is that it might be crossing the blood brain barrier of the brain where it is “turning off” the automatic ability to breathe. Some people must force themselves to stay awake so that they can consciously make themselves breathe. If they fall asleep, they could suffocate or simply die from not breathing. Then there is the problem of the virus hiding out in the brain and possibly becoming active later. These ideas have not been proven yet but they’re seeing some evidence for them.

They are also finding it in cerebral and spinal fluid. Some recovered people are developing tics weeks later. Some are developing schizophrenia.

And younger people are getting hit hard, too. It is really best to stay in for awhile.

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🇲🇾 https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/asia/malaysia-bars-citizens-overseas-foreigners-entering-covid19-12543454

“From Mar 18 to Mar 31, all Malaysians are prohibited from leaving the country. Those who return from overseas will have to go through health checks and go on a 14-day self-quarantine, said Mr Muhyiddin. 

Foreigners will also not be allowed to enter Malaysia during this period, he added.

Public gatherings and movements in the whole country, including religious events, sports meets, social and cultural activities will be prohibited, he said. 

"All places of worships and business premises must be closed, except for supermarkets, grocery stores and convenience stores selling everyday necessities," he said. 

All schools and higher learning institutions will also be closed, he added. 

Malaysia, the worst-hit country in Southeast Asia so far, has reported 125 new infections, bringing the total number of cases to 553.

More than 300 cases were linked to a gathering held at a mosque between Feb 28 and Mar 1 in Sri Petaling, Kuala Lumpur. 

The event, attended by 16,000 people, has also led to infections in Brunei, Singapore and Indonesia.

Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department (Religious Affairs) Zulkifli Mohamad Al-Bakri said on Monday that all religious activities and Friday prayers at mosques and surau nationwide will be suspended for 10 days from Mar 17 to Mar 26.”

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1 minute ago, SanDiegoMom in VA said:

I just don't see this in my family at least -- yes they valued autonomy and agency, but they also don't want to die.

 

Same here. My parents were very health conscious and very much "do unto others." I have no doubt if they were around now they'd be hunkered down. Same with my 84 yo MIL. She's very concerned about it and is staying home except when she absolutely has to go out. And that's a huge thing for her, she's a massive extrovert who is almost always going out on lunch dates, shopping, playing cards with a group, etc. I don't know ANY older person who is at all like what is often described on here as typical.

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9 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

One huge concern about this virus is that it might be crossing the blood brain barrier of the brain where it is “turning off” the automatic ability to breathe. Some people must force themselves to stay awake so that they can consciously make themselves breathe. If they fall asleep, they could suffocate or simply die from not breathing. Then there is the problem of the virus hiding out in the brain and possibly becoming active later. These ideas have not been proven yet but they’re seeing some evidence for them.

They are also finding it in cerebral and spinal fluid. Some recovered people are developing tics weeks later. Some are developing schizophrenia.

And younger people are getting hit hard, too. It is really best to stay in for awhile.

This is what I believe causes the people dropping dead. People get distracted, pass out, die.

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19 minutes ago, sassenach said:

Oh for sure! I still want them to behave like the rest of us to limit the spread. I was more thinking of all the people who have posted that they’re no longer going to visit the elderly in their lives. I think it’s cruel to force total isolation if they’re not asking for that. 

 

Our area has requested “visiting” by phone, Skype, FaceTime, etc.  as much as possible. 

I also think for older people to try to shop earlier could be better because there might have been fewer recent germs from asymptomatic young people. 

It is hard for me to remember that I am on cusp of being in older categories myself as well as having some other conditions that may add risk.

I should shop on the earlier side myself I think so long as no black ice etc to make drive to city a particular danger. 

 

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18 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

One huge concern about this virus is that it might be crossing the blood brain barrier of the brain where it is “turning off” the automatic ability to breathe. Some people must force themselves to stay awake so that they can consciously make themselves breathe. If they fall asleep, they could suffocate or simply die from not breathing. Then there is the problem of the virus hiding out in the brain and possibly becoming active later. These ideas have not been proven yet but they’re seeing some evidence for them.

They are also finding it in cerebral and spinal fluid. Some recovered people are developing tics weeks later. Some are developing schizophrenia.

And younger people are getting hit hard, too. It is really best to stay in for awhile.

 

Do you have any links about this?

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I don’t know how we can fully discuss the choices of older people in our lives without discussing the sources of information they might be relying on, at least here in the US. Which unfortunately becomes political. I don’t want to go there, but I do want to acknowledge the elephant in the room before moving on (and let’s move on in our discussion, please). Sources of information are hardly definitive in what makes up our elders’ choices, but there is a divide in our country regarding how the information was and is being presented. That is real and influential for some. It’s certainly true in my family, and I deeply hope not with tragic results.

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4 minutes ago, livetoread said:

I don’t know how we can fully discuss the choices of older people in our lives without discussing the sources of information they might be relying on, at least here in the US. Which unfortunately becomes political. I don’t want to go there, but I do want to acknowledge the elephant in the room before moving on (and let’s move on in our discussion, please). Sources of information are hardly definitive in what makes up our elders’ choices, but there is a divide in our country regarding how the information was and is being presented. That is real and influential for some. It’s certainly true in my family, and I deeply hope not with tragic results.

Or people not keeping up to date at all that just assume it is NBD.

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Just now, soror said:

Or people not keeping up to date at all that just assume it is NBD.

My over 70 year old Mother-in-law, diabetic 40 year old daughter and 12 year old granddaughter all went to NYC for a fun weekend trip. They are still there and flying home Tuesday.  I just can't even. 

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7 minutes ago, livetoread said:

I don’t know how we can fully discuss the choices of older people in our lives without discussing the sources of information they might be relying on, at least here in the US. Which unfortunately becomes political. I don’t want to go there, but I do want to acknowledge the elephant in the room before moving on (and let’s move on in our discussion, please). Sources of information are hardly definitive in what makes up our elders’ choices, but there is a divide in our country regarding how the information was and is being presented. That is real and influential for some. It’s certainly true in my family, and I deeply hope not with tragic results.

 

Perhaps We could discuss how to share accurate information with elders and others. 

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24 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

 

Do you have any links about this?

 

Discusses finding the virus in the brain and patients who could not breathe spontaneously. There’s another preprint discussing finding it in spinal fluid.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32104915

The heart and kidneys have receptors for this virus which explains why some people are dying from non-respiratory conditions. (From a podcast I listened to of an MD discussing Covid and ways to treat it.)

Im packing up my son’s stuff today because he’s going to stay with us if we get lock downed. So, kind of busy. Anyway, some viruses have the ability to hide out and reactivate later, like shingles. That’s a concern with this.

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2 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

 

Discusses finding the virus in the brain and patients who could not breathe spontaneously. There’s another preprint discussing finding it in spinal fluid.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32104915

The heart and kidneys have receptors for this virus which explains why some people are dying from non-respiratory conditions. (From a podcast I listened to of an MD discussing Covid and ways to treat it.)

Im packing up my son’s stuff today because he’s going to stay with us if we get lock downed. So, kind of busy. Anyway, some viruses have the ability to hide out and reactivate later, like shingles. That’s a concern with this.

 

Thanks.  I think the thought a few weeks back, was there was no way to avoid it.  So get it and if you are young and have no health conditions you will be ok.   Now the more they learn about it.  The more I want to try to avoid getting it. 

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One of our first local cases went public with her story. She works in a small office and isn't sure where she might have been exposed although she did attend a pro sports event recently. She said it came on very suddenly. She felt tired and that she might be getting sick so she went home early from work. She had a slight fever and took Motrin and went to sleep. She woke up in the middle of the night with chest pains and struggling to breathe. When she went to the hospital, they met her in the parking lot and took her right to isolation. She had low blood pressure, high heart rate, headache, fever, cough, fatigue, breathing difficulties and she called it "brutal". She said the hospital tested her for every other possible thing before doing the coronavirus test. She's at home after two days in the hospital and still has a fever and fatigue. She decided to go public after seeing a post on a local FB page from someone she knew who thought it was all overblown who asked. "Does anyone actually KNOW someone who has Covid-19?"

I talked to my mom this morning and she said she's starting to get scared. They're at high risk and are staying home, but she was worried about paying a bill  that she normally pays at the bank. I told her to forget about it for now or mail it. They don't keep much food in the house and they're not close to me, but restaurants are still allowed to deliver so that's an option for them. She doesn't have a smartphone or computer, so she can't order or pay online and would still have to interact with delivery person or call me to order for her. ETA: I guess she can pay by credit card when she calls to order.

Edited by mom2scouts
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37 minutes ago, mommyoffive said:

 

Thanks.  I think the thought a few weeks back, was there was no way to avoid it.  So get it and if you are young and have no health conditions you will be ok.   Now the more they learn about it.  The more I want to try to avoid getting it. 

 

Even a good many of the “mild” cases are very significant and may leave permanent impairment.  It is a very hard situation between not wanting to panic people and cause far more problems that would ensue from panic and wanting people to be adequately vigilant. 

No one can be sure that they will be okay.  We do not know what will be the later sequel even for kids between 2-10 who seem to have truly mild cases now.  They may have lurking dormant virus that will attack later on.  It is a Novel virus. New.  We don’t know.  The greatest experts don’t.

We do know that Italy, which has advanced health care and a universal health care system, it is not some backwater in remote African village, has people in critical condition or even dying who had been fit and under 40.  We have been told by interviews with doctors there that they have had to intubate young people as young as age 20 who cannot breathe on own . 

Nearly everyone should avoid it as long as is possible. 

Some people because of circumstances (such as emergency first responders) won’t be able to.  

But IMO, do whatever you can to not get it for as long as possible, both for society and also for yourself. 

Edited by Pen
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47 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

One of our first local cases went public with her story. She works in a small office and isn't sure where she might have been exposed although she did attend a pro sports event recently. She said it came on very suddenly. She felt tired and that she might be getting sick so she went home early from work. She had a slight fever and took Motrin and went to sleep. She woke up in the middle of the night with chest pains and struggling to breathe. When she went to the hospital, they met her in the parking lot and took her right to isolation. She had low blood pressure, high heart rate, headache, fever, cough, fatigue, breathing difficulties and she called it "brutal". She said the hospital tested her for every other possible thing before doing the coronavirus test. She's at home after two days in the hospital and still has a fever and fatigue. She decided to go public after seeing a post on a local FB page from someone she knew who thought it was all overblown who asked. "Does anyone actually KNOW someone who has Covid-19?"

 

I saw that same FB post! Either that or there's a group that's encouraging people to ask this question on FB, and then when someone says they know someone with COVID-19, there's a follow up, "How are they doing now?"

No reply after that to anyone whose response describes a difficult course of the illness.

I wonder about the motivation behind this. To me it sounds like fostering skepticism that COVID-19 is real, and giving people the idea that it's manufactured to try to advance some kind of political agenda. 

Edited by Acadie
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3 minutes ago, Acadie said:

I wonder about the motivation behind this. 

It's because there's really no virus and it's all made up to infringe on our rights, ruin the economy or make Trump look bad, depending on who you ask.

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44 minutes ago, BeachGal said:

 

Discusses finding the virus in the brain and patients who could not breathe spontaneously. There’s another preprint discussing finding it in spinal fluid.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32104915

The heart and kidneys have receptors for this virus which explains why some people are dying from non-respiratory conditions. (From a podcast I listened to of an MD discussing Covid and ways to treat it.)

Im packing up my son’s stuff today because he’s going to stay with us if we get lock downed. So, kind of busy. Anyway, some viruses have the ability to hide out and reactivate later, like shingles. That’s a concern with this.

 

Thanks hadn’t seen these and will look later when have time.

 

Repeating a comment I put earlier:  SARS2 is known to attach to human tissue at ACE2 receptors. There are such receptors prevalent in lungs.  

And also in other organs.  There are many ACE2 receptors in the Central Nervous System.  Brain.

 

( I recommend also looking again at the slide show from Germany I have linked about vitamin D and ACE2 system. )

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13 hours ago, sassenach said:

Older people, in general, do not value safety as much as younger people. They value autonomy, agency, routine, and family. They would rather live as they choose than live longer. 
 

I think we should respect that their decisions and priorities are different than what we desire for them. This is THE issue in elder care in general. Safety vs autonomy. 

Generally I agree, however this is such a different situation than anything we’ve experienced before. Also their choices affect other people too, in terms of infecting others and overwhelming the healthcare syatem. My parents were reluctant to isolate for those same reasons but, as an ICU nurse facing the deluge I just can’t add worrying about them taking precautions to my load. Also they are in a different country so I almost certainly won’t be able to get to them if they are dying. Fortunately they have agreed to isolate and I feel like a huge weight is of my shoulders. May not work but at least they are doing everything possible.

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I was not able to hear it, but apparently the Sunday afternoon news program (All things considered? Maybe?) on NPR station of someone I know had a segment with someone describing her experience with CV19 yesterday.  Possibly it’s on line 

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14 minutes ago, Pen said:

I was not able to hear it, but apparently the Sunday afternoon news program (All things considered? Maybe?) on NPR station of someone I know had a segment with someone describing her experience with CV19 yesterday.  Possibly it’s on line 

 

Here's one that describes rapid onset of breathing difficulties. I really appreciate people coming forward to tell their stories so we can understand what's at stake.

https://www.cleveland.com/coronavirus/2020/03/hudson-mom-amy-driscoll-shares-her-brutal-encounter-after-being-diagnosed-with-coronavirus.html?fbclid=IwAR189G03ktRHyPoWsSpXysgZ8u91F8Tg4xn-elRAQjq-T9cKDQv23gqs3bU

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Yes, it seems like human interest stories are in short supply. That's what I want to read right now. I also wish the news stations would post pics of the deceased/victims like they do with terrorist attacks and natural disasters. I think seeing faces (especially younger ones) will make the situation more real. (I realize privacy issues make the latter unlikely, but that's what I personally want to see.)

21 minutes ago, Acadie said:

 

Here's one that describes rapid onset of breathing difficulties. I really appreciate people coming forward to tell their stories so we can understand what's at stake.

https://www.cleveland.com/coronavirus/2020/03/hudson-mom-amy-driscoll-shares-her-brutal-encounter-after-being-diagnosed-with-coronavirus.html?fbclid=IwAR189G03ktRHyPoWsSpXysgZ8u91F8Tg4xn-elRAQjq-T9cKDQv23gqs3bU

 

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2 hours ago, Slache said:

This is what I believe causes the people dropping dead. People get distracted, pass out, die.

From what I’ve read it seems they are dying due to cardiac arrest due to extremely decreased cardiac function which may be a cardiomyopathy caused by the virus.

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@mathnerd
https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/gilroy-mayor-confirms-coronavirus-death-added-case-in-city/2255126/
“An elderly person has died after contracting the novel coronavirus, Gilroy Mayor Roland Velasco announced on his Facebook page on Sunday night.

Mayor Velasco said on a post at 9:35 p.m. that he was informed earlier in the day of two cases of elderly people contracting the virus in the city, with one person passing away. They weren't identified.

He said both cases were confirmed by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention”

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13 minutes ago, mlktwins said:

51 cases in VA with 1 death.  

 

Aaaaaand this is why my teen thinks I'm a horrible mom. "Those OTHER moms think this is NBD, why can't I sleepover at Xs house?" Maybe B/C her parents are idiots who think this is NBD! Who knows where they've been! My DDs 15yo best friend in Italy is now very sick and coughing up bloody sputum. This is not a joke.

Edited by Sneezyone
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Southwest VA still has zero cases.  I'm pondering going to Pet Smart to stock up on cat food, since if there's a major shut down, grocery stores will probably be open but maybe not Pet Smart.  Also pondering buying truckloads of Easter candy.  I have an urge to stress munch.  

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3 minutes ago, Terabith said:

Southwest VA still has zero cases.  I'm pondering going to Pet Smart to stock up on cat food, since if there's a major shut down, grocery stores will probably be open but maybe not Pet Smart.  Also pondering buying truckloads of Easter candy.  I have an urge to stress munch.  

 

I am concerned about the pet store closing too. How do I keep enough bugs on hand for our bearded dragon for 30 days! Grocery stores usually have cat/dog food, right?

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1 minute ago, vonfirmath said:

 

I am concerned about the pet store closing too. How do I keep enough bugs on hand for our bearded dragon for 30 days! Grocery stores usually have cat/dog food, right?

They have some food, but not the Friskies pates of certain flavors that my cats eat.  My older cat doesn't have many teeth, and other brands/ formulations make her vomit.  There's always amazon or chewy, but I know delivery times are going to be long.  I have two weeks worth, but concerned it's not enough.  

Bugs would be a real issue.  Maybe a tank for them?  How many bugs does he eat a day?  

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1 minute ago, Terabith said:

They have some food, but not the Friskies pates of certain flavors that my cats eat.  My older cat doesn't have many teeth, and other brands/ formulations make her vomit.  There's always amazon or chewy, but I know delivery times are going to be long.  I have two weeks worth, but concerned it's not enough.  

Bugs would be a real issue.  Maybe a tank for them?  How many bugs does he eat a day?  

 

She's 6 months old. She eats 6 superworms, 12-14 crickets or roaches and about 10 smaller worms (mealworms/Phoenix worms) evreyday. Plus a plateful of mustard greens (or other greens I leave for her).  So about 30 bugs a day.

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1 minute ago, Sneezyone said:


Can it be auto-delivered from an online source?

 

Will the post office remain open? That's a big unknown. I do have a couple of suppliers I buy from online already. (Amazon has a bad rep for their bugs showing up dead.)

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