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6 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Set up as in there was no way for any of us to answer honestly without opprobrium, not as in a set up by the OP.

All us non US people should have ignored it.

 

We could have gone to the "dark wtm forum" for non-Americans. 😂

By the way, there was a term used by Australians "bogan." I'd never heard the term, but Wiki had this local definition for me, which I'm sure is not the same as your definition! I have NEVER heard this used in Canada as either a creek or an indigenous person. I think wiki may be wrong.

bogan (plural bogans) (Canada) Any narrow water or creek, particularly a tranquil backwater. (Canada, North Western Ontario, slang, derogatory, offensive) An indigenous person.

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The discussion isn't are all Americans like this or do the non-Americans on the board think this is what all Americans are like. The discussion is why do those who generalize think this way. Amer

I am not wasting time on disclaimers, since you all know that lumping people into a group doesn't account for the individual. But here's what comes to mind (and when I say "Americans", I obviously do

Don't shoot the messenger; these are not all my opinions: On a geopolitical level: interfering in the affairs of other countries (friend or foe) and generally throwing weight around.  Dominant co

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Just now, wintermom said:

We could have gone to the "dark wtm forum" for non-Americans. 😂

By the way, there was a term used by Australians "bogan." I'd never heard the term, but Wiki had this local definition for me, which I'm sure is not the same as your definition!

bogan (plural bogans) (Canada) Any narrow water or creek, particularly a tranquil backwater. (Canada, North Western Ontario, slang, derogatory, offensive) An indigenous person.

 

No, bogan in our dialect is the equivalent of  American trailer trash, without being a direct translation. It is definitely *not* a direct translation.

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7 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Set up as in there was no way for any of us to answer honestly without opprobrium, not as in a set up by the OP.

All us non US people should have ignored it.

 

 

Nah. Then the OP would have been hurt and we wouldn't have wanted to do that either.

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10 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

No, bogan in our dialect is the equivalent of  American trailer trash, without being a direct translation. It is definitely *not* a direct translation.

I'm not even sure what "American trailer trash" is. Ther visual is "people who live in trailers," but I think half of the Canadians who live in Florida live in trailers, and I don't think they are considered "trailer trash."  I saw some trailers off a highway in Nevada. We came up with the term for these, "unplanned communities." Or living off the grid.

This is what wiki has for Australian/New Zealand bogan. Is this how you use the term?

Bogan (/ˈboʊɡən/ BOHG-ən) is Australian and New Zealand slang for a person whose speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour are considered unrefined or unsophisticated. 

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Just now, wintermom said:

I'm not even sure what "American trailer trash" is. This is what wiki has for Australian/New Zealand bogan. Is this how you use the term?

Bogan (/ˈboʊɡən/ BOHG-ən) is Australian and New Zealand slang for a person whose speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour are considered unrefined or unsophisticated. 

 

A certain type of speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour, yeah. Being my scruffy, Aspie self isn't boganism.
It's a class thing, hence the term "cashed up bogan" for a bogan who is doing well financially but retains the same world view and priorities.

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This thread has been very interesting.

I love traveling overseas and I love learning about other cultures, especially the things that are done differently. 

I remember one time when I traveled to The Netherlands and spent the summer there with my then boyfriend. I jumped on my bike and pedaled into the town center around noon to buy something for lunch. Imagine my surprise when the grocery was closed as were the restaurants. I bike home and ask my boyfriend if it's a holiday. Not a holiday, he informs me, but what happens every weekday at lunch. The kids leave school, adults leave their jobs, and everyone goes home to eat lunch together. I could have complained and ranted, but I found it charming and quaint. Plus, I learned to head out to the market early.

My entire love of travel is because I don't want things to be the same as the U.S. If I wanted that, I wouldn't travel. However, I have witnessed on multiple trips the typical American stereotype mentioned here. I remember one instance on a train in Italy when a group of American couples were talking loudly and about American life to some Italians who asked. I remember sitting there thinking, "I wish they'd be quiet and stop saying things that aren't true about most Americans." They were wealthy Californians and what they were sharing as "normal" American life was in no way "normal". In fact, it came across as bragging and out of touch. Not to mention it was a night train and everyone was probably wanting to sleep. I even told my traveling companion, "I hope nobody figures out we're American and assumes we're with them."

For the most part I think Americans expect the world, especially first world countries, to be like the Americanized versions of those cultures or at the very least basically American, but with accents and older buildings. It's a lack of education about other cultures in our school system and a lack of cultural awareness and sensitivity due to our geographical isolation from most of the world and long fed diet of American exceptionalism (aka the world owes us).

My only complaint about overseas travel is the lack of ice in my water at restaurants. 😂 But I adapt while I'm there. I've also discovered I'm basically European at heart and the things other Americans complain about are my favorite things when I'm there. 

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1 hour ago, Mbelle said:

As an american who goes to Aus a lot and is married to one....

Australians tease and make fun of each other A LOT from my perspective.  They also use a lot of sarcasm.  Of course certain parts of the US use sarcasm too, but where I live it's used much less often and milder.  Anyway, all that can come across as a bit of bullying if you aren't used to it.   It's like many things with a cultural difference it's just the way it is.  

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13 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

A certain type of speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour, yeah. Being my scruffy, Aspie self isn't boganism.
It's a class thing, hence the term "cashed up bogan" for a bogan who is doing well financially but retains the same world view and priorities.

I don't think politically correct Canadians are supposed to have a term for that. If we do, it must always be followed by the correct, Canadian additive, "sorry." 😉  

The closest expression I can think of is "redneck." I'm not sure this is the same connotation though, because I see "redneck" as a handy person who can fix things with duct tape or the like. Usually a person with a red neck gets it from working outdoors, such as a farmer. And farmers are good at fixing things. I'm super literal. 

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2 minutes ago, Melissa in Australia said:

The quoted above,

 plus I am rural Australian, they tend to be a bit more straightforward in Conversation

 

The women, anyway.

Up here in Murray Basin Plan land, I'm surprised at what I'm seeing from the men. Or, rather, what I'm not seeing.

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2 minutes ago, wintermom said:

I don't think politically correct Canadians are supposed to have a term for that. If we do, it must always be followed by the correct, Canadian additive, "sorry." 😉  

The closest expression I can think of is "redneck." I'm not sure this is the same connotation though, because I see "redneck" as a handy person who can fix things with duct tape or the like. 

 

Nah, in our dialect, redneck and bogan are not synonymous. Bogan is very much an urban term.

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31 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Final comment.

I feel like this thread was a set up. 

Basically, there's nothing I should ever say to Americans except 'Yay you'.

Because that's all that every going to be accepted.

I feel sad and offended that answering a question about national stereotypes has posters saying that we (non US) just fake the care and concern we show for US boardies in hard times. 

And how freaking interesting that the thread  was forced to end with the non USians having to perform social apology before  reintergration into the 'community' can be considered.

Really, really disappointed in this thread.

Tolerated as pets, that what y'all communicate. 

As an American who has waded through this entire thread, I was utterly dumbfounded at the thin-skinned, defensive responses from many of my fellow countrymen. Many of those posts were the epitome of a stereotypical American response when anything approaching criticism is leveled at us.

I knew exactly what Rosie and others meant by “talking using American manners”. And I could predict how this thread would go. I’m still saddened that a question *by an American* elicited such defensiveness at the honest answers delivered by non-Americans in our community. (And not all of the non-American responders were from the English speaking,  western European sphere.) And, it must be said, some of the same posters who responded defensively have themselves used over generalizations and broad-brush paintings when posting about different groups in varying contexts. 

Of course stereotypes don’t describe everyone in a group. No one said they did. And all descriptions of a group don’t apply to all members in the group at all times and in all places. But stereotypes exist for a reason; general descriptions based on broad experiences exist for a reason. 

I don’t think you, Stella, or anyone else need apologize for your thoughts, perspectives, opinions, etc. I’m just one American; however, you don’t need to reintegrate into the community because in my humble view you (a) have nothing to apologize for and (b) weren’t ever outside the community. That’s probably my American arrogance showing, no? <— last directed at me with my tongue firmly in my cheek 😉

Personally, I don’t tolerate you; I very much appreciate your varied perspectives. Frankly, they’re desperately needed as we Americans can be, and many times are, incredibly myopic.

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27 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

No, bogan in our dialect is the equivalent of  American trailer trash, without being a direct translation. It is definitely *not* a direct translation.

I know what a bogan is from reading the comments on the Australian Daily Mail. Lots of talk about bogans there...😂

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Just now, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Nah, in our dialect, redneck and bogan are not synonymous. Bogan is very much an urban term.

Bogan and redneck are not the same.  Redneck can just be country or could be hick but it's not bogan.  Trailer trash isn't quite right either.  My bogan rellies are all working in good jobs whereas trailer trash might not be working steadily.

 

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Just now, happysmileylady said:

So basically “talk to American” manners involve a lot of clarification of specifics, disclaimers that the discussion doesn’t apply to specific people, and for goodness sake please take a joke?

 

Nah. That's poor quality talking to Americans manners. 🙂 Good quality talking to Americans manners will require none of that because we would have stayed silent.

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3 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

See my thought it I wouldn’t need to, because I would never knowingly say something offensive and stereotypes about another country or poster.  That just isn’t done in my circles, not even jokingly unless it’s clearly an inside thing.  My view is if I’d have to preface it with that much soft pedaling it’s better unsaid.

I don’t understand the punching up thing either - I don’t view a political figure or star I dislike as fair game for that either, though.  I’m pretty careful with satire and mockery in general because it can be cutting and mean and just isn’t appropriate for a Christian to engage in.  So I do a lot of mental consideration of certain types of humor because for me that can be a big inadvertent pitfall.

This could be a cultural difference between us, for sure.  But plenty of Americans on this thread were okay with it, which is what I was trying to wrap my brain around as maybe being some perception difference in the appropriateness of repeating a stereotype. I’m not particularly patriotic and I’ve lived abroad and traveled some, as well as having lived in very different corners of my own country.  I’m not unaware of how to be a decent world citizen when outside my own comfort zone.  And repeating things that could be construed as insulting or hurtful is beyond what I’ve been conditioned is polite and appropriate.

Obviously we won’t see eye to eye on this, that’s okay.  I’m not particularly interested in ‘getting my way’ so much as just trying to understand where I was disconnecting on this ever being an ‘okay’ topic to indulge in with polite company.  My brain was going “what...?”

I guess we thought we were talking to friends

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4 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

Obviously we won’t see eye to eye on this, that’s okay.  I’m not particularly interested in ‘getting my way’ so much as just trying to understand where I was disconnecting on this ever being an ‘okay’ topic to indulge in with polite company.  My brain was going “what...?”

 

Okay, I'm only explaining this because I think you might be asking.

This thread isn't "polite company" by your definition.

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2 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Nah, in our dialect, redneck and bogan are not synonymous. Bogan is very much an urban term.

I'm at a loss, then. I can't even think of a term we use in urban centres in Canada that translates "bogan."  Strange. Maybe ours is more of a city folk/country folk class system. Or maybe I'm from the bogan class and have yet to meet "the upper class" in my cities and therefore never heard or over-heard the term.

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2 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Nah. That's poor quality talking to Americans manners. 🙂 Good quality talking to Americans manners will require none of that because we would have stayed silent.

So, what you are saying is that most non Americans who hold negative views of Americans do so at least in part (perhaps in large part) because they believe Americans are overly sensitive and get hyper offended about every little thing?

 

IOW....don’t say thing Americans might think offensive?

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7 hours ago, annegables said:

As long as we are talking about fashion... If the tennis shoes (sneakers) are super weird (not just different colors, but more trendy), it was a European wearing them, both where I live in the US and abroad. Most of the US tourists seemed to have gotten the memo about white sneakers when I was there. I almost never saw a pair! 

But in France, I saw a ton of leggings and skinny jeans on Europeans. 

Hey, out here on the left coast, those Nike and Addidas retro white continentals tennis shoes.  er Rod Laver's.  are the hottest things for high school.

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2 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

So, what you are saying is that most non Americans who hold negative views of Americans do so at least in part (perhaps in large part) because they believe Americans are overly sensitive and get hyper offended about every little thing?

 

IOW....don’t say thing Americans might think offensive?

 

We've got a bit more nuance than that!

Not most Americans. A statistically significant amount.
Not every little thing. Certain types of things.

But your last sentence, basically yes.

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6 minutes ago, Arctic Mama said:

See my thought it I wouldn’t need to, because I would never knowingly say something offensive and stereotyped about another country or poster.  That just isn’t done in my circles, not even jokingly unless it’s clearly an inside thing.  My view is if I’d have to preface it with that much soft pedaling it’s better unsaid.

I don’t understand the punching up thing either - I don’t view a political figure or star I dislike as fair game for that either, though.  I’m pretty careful with satire and mockery in general because it can be cutting and mean and just isn’t appropriate for a Christian to engage in.  So I do a lot of mental consideration of certain types of humor because for me that can be a big inadvertent pitfall.

This could be a cultural difference between us, for sure.  But plenty of Americans on this thread were okay with it, which is what I was trying to wrap my brain around as maybe being some perception difference in the appropriateness of repeating a stereotype. I’m not particularly patriotic and I’ve lived abroad and traveled some, as well as having lived in very different corners of my own country.  I’m not unaware of how to be a decent world citizen when outside my own comfort zone.  And repeating things that could be construed as insulting or hurtful is beyond what I’ve been conditioned is polite and appropriate.

Obviously we won’t see eye to eye on this, that’s okay.  I’m not particularly interested in ‘getting my way’ so much as just trying to understand where I was disconnecting on this ever being an ‘okay’ topic to indulge in with polite company.  My brain was going “what...?”

 

What have people said that you see as offensive, insulting, or hurtful? I'm genuinely asking, because I don't consider it offensive or even impolite to acknowledge that American tourists tend to come across as loud, over-confident, and often less than respectful of local customs. That is how a lot of Americans act when abroad — why is it insulting to mention that reality? Why does politeness require ignoring reality and refusing to answer someone's genuine question?

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4 minutes ago, Corraleno said:

 

What have people said that you see as offensive, insulting, or hurtful? I'm genuinely asking, because I don't consider it offensive or even impolite to acknowledge that American tourists tend to come across as loud, over-confident, and often less than respectful of local customs. That is how a lot of Americans act when abroad — why is it insulting to mention that reality? Why does politeness require ignoring reality and refusing to answer someone's genuine question?

 

Not to be rude, but Arctic has explained quite thoroughly. What part of her explanation is missing? 
(I'm only asking because another explanation would probably still miss whatever pieces of the puzzle you're missing.)

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1 hour ago, StellaM said:

 

Look at my first post in this thread. 

It's not exactly direct, is it ? It's full of caveats meant to reassure an American audience that I appreciate many things about them/their culture. I don't normally talk like that. That's 'American manners'. And yeah, the caveats ? True, but also expressed to avoid American backlash (which didn't work, but hey)

(I'm not actually the best example, tbh, but it's clear in this thread).

So are you saying that Aussies are generally to the point and blunt when talking with each other?  

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1 hour ago, Mbelle said:

As an american who goes to Aus a lot and is married to one....

Australians tease and make fun of each other A LOT from my perspective.  They also use a lot of sarcasm.  Of course certain parts of the US use sarcasm too, but where I live it's used much less often and milder.  Anyway, all that can come across as a bit of bullying if you aren't used to it.   It's like many things with a cultural difference it's just the way it is, 

This is very helpful.  At first I thought people were whitewashing things for us or something.  I wasn't sure what that meant. 

Yes, I can see that as being misinterpreted by Americans.   My sister and her husband tease and make fun of each other a lot too (both Americans)... and I find it hard to listen too because it's just not the way my dh and I communicate.  I think my dh would be deeply offended if I did that. 

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21 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

We've got a bit more nuance than that!

Not most Americans. A statistically significant amount.
Not every little thing. Certain types of things.

But your last sentence, basically yes.

Do non Americans have “talking to...” code for everyone not of their own culture? “.  Like “talking to South Africans” manners?   Do Oeople from the UK have “talking to Australians” manners?   Do Australians have “ talking to Britians” manners?   Do New Zealanders have “Talking to Australians” manners?

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Just now, StellaM said:

 

Do you want the real answer, the fake answer, or the 'I'll take this as rhetorical and stay silent' answer ?

of course, I want the real answer...but if you'd rather you can PM me..  Since others might be offended.  

 

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One thing to consider is the overarching culture difference of working class culture vs middle class culture.  I'm not talking about how much money families earn, but the general culture of Aus vs US.  This makes a big difference in our values about different things.  

The other thing is that social cohesion is much more important in Australia than the US. Even more so in Tasmania because that is a known characteristic of island life most anywhere.  

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16 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Do New Zealanders have “Talking to Australians” manners?

I was shocked when I first went to Aus to find out how much these 2 countries get on each others nerves.  It is well beyond US/Canada (although I'm southern and Canada is so far away that kind of thing doesn't really exist here like border states)   Anyway, when I first went to AUS I heard how the Kiwi's were weird, had a chip on their shoulder and defensive and there's something wrong with them.  I couldn't believe it.  I thought they were making it up, but they weren't.

edited:  I mean by making it up that I thought they were Aussie teasing.

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13 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

So are you saying that Aussies are generally to the point and blunt when talking with each other?  

 

Not particularly. I think there is a lot of "don't say things that other people don't want to hear." 

Stella and I doing the Melbourne v Sydney thing is an accepted pattern, so we both know there's nothing to be offended about. Each culture knows it's own accepted smart arsery patterns. 

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11 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Do non Americans have “talking to...” code for everyone not of their own culture? “.  Like “talking to South Africans” manners?   Do Oeople from the UK have “talking to Australians” manners?   Do Australians have “ talking to Britians” manners?   Do New Zealanders have “Talking to Australians” manners?

 

Talking to Americans manners differs from talking to other non-Australians manners. 
Can't comment on what New Zealanders think. Mostly we're in a shame spiral about them because they've got a better prime minister than we have.

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1 hour ago, Rosie_0801 said:

I seriously hurt someone's feelings once by making a joke about how gross pumpkin pie is a couple of years in a row. *This* is the first time I have said anything about pumpkin pie in years. She was devastated. About a joke about me not liking pumpkin pie.

 

But pumpkin pie *is* gross. You aren't wrong, lol

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7 minutes ago, Mbelle said:

I was shocked when I first went to Aus to find out how much these 2 countries get on each others nerves.  It is well beyond US/Canada (although I'm southern and Canada is so far away that kind of thing doesn't really exist here like border states)   Anyway, when I first went to AUS I heard how the Kiwi's were weird, had a chip on their shoulder and defensive and there's something wrong with them.  I couldn't believe it.  I thought they were making it up, but they weren't.

edited:  I mean by making it up that I thought they were Aussie teasing.

 

I assume the New Zealanders hate us because we are mean to them about taxes and their prime minister is better than theirs, which I believe to be objectively true even for those who vote against her.

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5 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Talking to Americans manners differs from talking to other non-Australians manners. 
Can't comment on what New Zealanders think. Mostly we're in a shame spiral about them because they've got a better prime minister than we have.

Well yes, I would presume they are different.  What I am asking is if Austrailians (or other cultures) specifically use particular manners/mannerisms/vocabulary/etc with cultures not their own.  

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Just now, happysmileylady said:

Well yes, I would presume they are different.  What I am asking is if Austrailians (or other cultures) specifically use particular manners/mannerisms/vocabulary/etc with cultures not their own.  

 

I have not answered the question sufficiently?

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2 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

I have not answered the question sufficiently?

I apologize if my question isn't clear.

 

What I am asking is if people who aren't from the US have different "talking to X" manners for all the various cultures they encounter.  The original statement was non Americans using "talking to Americans" manners.  So my question is.....are there "talking to Columbians" manners?  Are there "talking to Canadians" manners?"  "Talking to Russians" manners?   And so on and so forth.

Does every culture get "Talking to X" manners, or is it only Americans who require such things?

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2 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Well yes, I would presume they are different.  What I am asking is if Austrailians (or other cultures) specifically use particular manners/mannerisms/vocabulary/etc with cultures not their own.  

Don't you? I definitely have adjusted my manners and such when interacting with those I know that wouldn't appreciate the normal, Southern US ones I grew up with. Heck, I find myself doing so with others from the US at times who don't understand so definitely with those from outside the US. 

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2 hours ago, StellaM said:

 

It's considered OK to 'punch up'. Your nation is dominant, ours is subservient. We're your lapdogs, in political terms.

 

Yours is just one of several comments excusing this behavior by pointing to the US' size or military power or whatever.

I am the same general size / power individual as most anyone here.  So is every other US person on this board.  Some of them are no less fragile than any fragile people in your circle.  Few if any of us have gone over to your country and hurt it in any way.  You certainly are not subservient to us.  And we certainly don't see you that way.

You are talking to and about individual human beings.  The thread is not "what do you dislike about US policies."

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1 minute ago, happysmileylady said:

I apologize if my question isn't clear.

 

What I am asking is if people who aren't from the US have different "talking to X" manners for all the various cultures they encounter.  The original statement was non Americans using "talking to Americans" manners.  So my question is.....are there "talking to Columbians" manners?  Are there "talking to Canadians" manners?"  "Talking to Russians" manners?   And so on and so forth.

Does every culture get "Talking to X" manners, or is it only Americans who require such things?

 

I said there are different "talking to" manners, but Americans are the only ones who get their own particular set of "talking to" manners. Talking to Americans manners are different to talking to other non-Australians manners.

I assume pretty much everyone has "talking to other" manners. We talk to our mothers differently from the way we talk to our fathers, to begin with.

As someone said, it's largely about power. I wouldn't be surprised if East Timorese speak to Australians similarly to the way Australians speak to Americans.

 

I don't know how to answer any better than this.

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4 minutes ago, Joker said:

Don't you? I definitely have adjusted my manners and such when interacting with those I know that wouldn't appreciate the normal, Southern US ones I grew up with. Heck, I find myself doing so with others from the US at times who don't understand so definitely with those from outside the US. 

On a message board?  Generally, no I don't, but generally, unless a person makes it known particularly where they are from, I would have no way of knowing which "manners" to use.

As a person living in the midwest of the US, who travels very little at this point, I actually don't encounter people from outside the US very often.  The closest interaction I have my the guy my DD23 is dating.  He is from India and honestly...........I wouldn't know what "talking to people from India" manners would be.  I do my best to be polite, nice, welcoming to our family, etc etc.  Am I supposed to have special manners to talk to him?  He doesn't seem to be offended by DH and I just being us?  (but then generally I don't think we are particularly rude or obnoxious....I am loud but not nasty.....)

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6 minutes ago, StellaM said:

 

 

Are Colombians part of the dominant political, cultural, financial, military global power ?

Are Canadians ?

Are Russians ?

Do you think they would require us to have a special set of manners for them ?

I am not sure what these questions have to do with what I am asking?   Are you suggesting that the individual citizens of a country are responsible for the political and global actions of such a country and therefore should be treated as such?

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2 hours ago, StellaM said:

OK, let me preface by saying that there is a lot I admire about America/American culture. 

For starters, nearly all my favourite poets are American. Many of my favourite novelists. Essayists. Musicians. Your art culture is vibrant. 

I have American friends (Americans who now live or have lived in AU) who are the loveliest people. I have never cried so hard as I did when one of my American friends left for the States.

My favourite posters here are American (and Canadian, and Australian!)

Phew. (Hope no-one will jump on me now!)

Because, frankly, if that isn't enough, then nothing is enough. I have never, even seen a single US poster bend over backwards like that to an non US poster.

 

Since we've read many posts over the years in which you basically come right out and say you hate the USA, I honestly didn't read this post as sincere.  No offense.

But maybe it's just Austrailan humor that I don't get.  I will consider that anyway, going forward.

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10 hours ago, PrincessMommy said:

My only question is how do get this information to my dh (who is easily offended, loud, and arrogant) before we travel abroad this year  😄

 
He won’t stand out as an American by being easily offended, loud and arrogant. He might be teased with “Ok Boomer” by impolite people as a retort. 

What make the Americans stand out in a bad way is when they are in another country and they complain and state that US does it so much better. Like commenting on how other people behave like doormats, don’t have true democracy, way behind in the space race. Also how everyone wants to come to America. Nobody wants to hear how great US is and how bad their city/county/country is from tourists.

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2 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

As a person living in the midwest of the US, who travels very little at this point, I actually don't encounter people from outside the US very often.  The closest interaction I have my the guy my DD23 is dating.  He is from India and honestly...........I wouldn't know what "talking to people from India" manners would be.  I do my best to be polite, nice, welcoming to our family, etc etc.  Am I supposed to have special manners to talk to him?  He doesn't seem to be offended by DH and I just being us?  (but then generally I don't think we are particularly rude or obnoxious....I am loud but not nasty.....)

 

If he's in your house, there's no need for "talking to Indians" manners.  It's your "talking to prospective son in law" manners, you're using, no?

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2 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I am not sure what these questions have to do with what I am asking?   Are you suggesting that the individual citizens of a country are responsible for the political and global actions of such a country and therefore should be treated as such?

 

No. We're saying it is part of the cultural baggage.

I didn't personally dispossess any Indigenous Australians from this land. They'd been booted off long before my brother bought this house. It's still cultural baggage though. 

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4 minutes ago, SKL said:

Since we've read many posts over the years in which you basically come right out and say you hate the USA, I honestly didn't read this post as sincere.  No offense.

But maybe it's just Austrailan humor that I don't get.  I will consider that anyway, going forward.

 

You know how lots of people have come into this thread to tell us that there is a difference between individual Americans and the political state/government of the USA?

We knew that already and the post you quoted is a demonstration of that knowledge.

If you want to correctly interpret Stella, take the post you quoted at face value. It was not insincere and has nothing to do with Australian humour. 

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1 minute ago, Arcadia said:

 
He won’t stand out as an American by being easily offended, loud and arrogant. He might be teased with “Ok Boomer” by impolite people as a retort. 

What make the Americans stand out in a bad way is when they are in another country and they complain and state that US does it so much better. Like commenting on how other people behave like doormats, don’t have true democracy, way behind in the space race. Also how everyone wants to come to America. Nobody wants to hear how great US is and how bad their city/county/country is from tourists.

no my dh wouldn't do that.   

The only person I've ever heard do that was an Iranian man living here in the US.. and married to an American.  He would often opine about how much better the food was in Iran.  Especially the fruits and veggies.  So much better than bland American fruits and veggies.  He would say this every time we ate with him.   We thought it was sweet.  He was nostalgic for his own country and we suspected he was probably right.  American store-bought fruits and veggies probably are less flavorful than what you can buy in Iranian markets.  

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6 minutes ago, PrincessMommy said:

The only person I've ever heard do that was an Iranian man living here in the US.. and married to an American.  He would often opine about how much better the food was in Iran.  Especially the fruits and veggies.  So much better than bland American fruits and veggies.  He would say this every time we ate with him.   We thought it was sweet.  He was nostalgic for his own country and we suspected he was probably right.  American store-bought fruits and veggies probably are less flavorful than what you can buy in Iranian markets.  

 

I defy anyone to say that is an inappropriate complaint.

Gotta draw a line somewhere, and I draw the line about food. 😄

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I can’t imagine anyone listening to Stella over the years and thinking she hates America or Americans.  I know that’s not true.  
actually I can’t think of a single poster here who I’d be able to say definitively hates anything, much less an entire country.   We all have our dislikes and there are certain groups i steer clear of but I try (try is the operative word...) not to hate.  I think most people here are the same way.    

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