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17 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

Here the greys are not native. They are larger and out-compete the reds. They also carry a virus that is harmless to them and fatal to reds.

Ah, but those are European red squirrels with those cute tufty ears.  American red squirrels are a whole 'nother thing.  I talk of the latter.  Says Wikipedia: American red squirrels should not be confused with Eurasian red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris); since the ranges of these species do not overlap, they are both commonly referred to as "red squirrels" in the areas where they are native. These are ours:

Tamiasciurus hudsonicus CT.jpg

Invasive, non-native species are always a huge problem.  Like, starlings and English 'sparrows' are invasive and over-compete native birds in the US, but aren't a problem over on your side of the pond. But our native red squirrels are invasive in a different way!  And if you don't like our gray variety, be glad we haven't exported the red ones! 🙃

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The discussion isn't are all Americans like this or do the non-Americans on the board think this is what all Americans are like. The discussion is why do those who generalize think this way. Amer

I am not wasting time on disclaimers, since you all know that lumping people into a group doesn't account for the individual. But here's what comes to mind (and when I say "Americans", I obviously do

Don't shoot the messenger; these are not all my opinions: On a geopolitical level: interfering in the affairs of other countries (friend or foe) and generally throwing weight around.  Dominant co

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1 minute ago, Matryoshka said:

Ah, but those are European red squirrels with those cute tufty ears.  American red squirrels are a whole 'nother thing.  I talk of the latter.  These little stinkers:

Tamiasciurus hudsonicus CT.jpg

Invasive, non-native species are always a huge problem.  Like, starlings and English 'sparrows' are invasive and over-compete native birds in the US, but aren't a problem over on your side of the pond. But our native red squirrels are invasive in a different way!

Is this a photo of squirrels found in mountain areas? I saw some in the Canadian Rockies. They were so different than the red squirrel we have in Ontario. We also have grey and black squirrels. I believe the blacks are simply a colour variation of the greys. 

The reds here are smaller and much faster than the greys and blacks. They are cute and they can be pretty noisy in forests. Their "yelling" at intruders in their woods sounds really cute. I feel like saying, "You sound so cute when you're mad."  I'm sure that would make them even more furious. 😉

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28 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

Stereotype: a tour group in baggy Bermuda shorts and loose T-shirts with plastic designs or writing on them, sneakers, maybe sunglasses and baseball cap. 

Perhaps it is because we went not in summer but still nice out, but I never saw this anywhere in France. Not that I doubt this exists🤣. I was rather surprised at the polo shirt thing. It was very much a middle-aged American or Asian male thing. In fact, my DH, who speaks perfect French, was spoken to in English while I, who knows no Frecnch, was spoken to in French by shopkeepers because I didnt dress as "American". And this might be why some Americans might be seen as rude in European shops by not greeting the proprietor. I didnt greet them because I dont know the language much at all, and didnt want to be seen as an assuming American tourist who expects everyone to speak English.🤣

What was also interesting and relevant to this discussion was that we stayed in an airbnb in the Paris suburbs and my kids played at the local park with French kids. Many of the French kids had never met an AMerican child before and they asked my kids loads of questions, which seemed to be based off of assumptions from Am movies. Nope, we all dont live in big houses with dogs!

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7 minutes ago, wintermom said:

Is this a photo of squirrels found in mountain areas? I saw some in the Canadian Rockies. They were so different than the red squirrel we have in Ontario. We also have grey and black squirrels. I believe the blacks are simply a colour variation of the greys. 

The reds here are smaller and much faster than the greys and blacks. They are cute and they can be pretty noisy in forests. Their "yelling" at intruders in their woods sounds really cute. I feel like saying, "You sound so cute when you're mad."  I'm sure that would make them even more furious. 😉

I live in New England.  Their range is fairly large, and does seem to include some mountains, but lots of flat places too.  They actually seem more widely distributed in Canada than the US.  But what other kind of red squirrel would you have in Ontario?  Should be the same kind as in the pic above; that's what we have here.  The wiki page does say there are subspecies, but I'm a lot closer to Ontario here than the Rockies...

Tamiasciurus hudsonicus range map.png

 

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The reds here are smaller and much faster than the greys and blacks. They are cute and they can be pretty noisy in forests. Their "yelling" at intruders in their woods sounds really cute. I feel like saying, "You sound so cute when you're mad."  I'm sure that would make them even more furious. 😉

Yes, this is true of the reds here too.  Smaller and more opinionated than the grays (but bigger than a chipmunk).

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In California we had a squirrel living nearby who used to sneak into the house and take bites out of any produce I left out on the counter. 

My favorite wildlife in Europe was the hedgehogs--they used to come eat the food we left out for the dog. They were cute in their very pricklish way.

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36 minutes ago, SKL said:

Speaking of squirrels, why is it that the ones in my parents' neck of the woods are almost all black now?  Always used to be gray.  Fascinating!

(I don't like squirrels kuz I have known squirrels who (a) pooped on my when I was reading under a tree, (b) snuck into my basement / attic and made messes, and (c) ate food left out for non-rodents.  I do realize it is probably unreasonably of me to stereotype all squirrels based on a few bad experiences.  But too bad.)

This summer I visited some family in the DC area and enjoyed showing my kids the black squirrels, since we have only gray where we live. My uncle said there's a little joke locally about trying to prevent a certain someone who lives in the area from finding out that there is an invasion of black squirrels that seems to be winning.

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5 hours ago, Islandgal said:

I'm genuinely sorry if I offended anyone by my posts. I feel that I have tried to only answer questions asked, without going into too much detail about my own experiences lest I rock the boat further. Which may have been a mistake on my part, and perceived as generalization.

My brother is married to an American and is an American citizen, I have close cousins and friends both married into the military and civilians. My entire life, I have travelled to various parts of the U.S. multiple times a year. I have probably seen more of the U.S. than some Americans have. Americans are always in my country for work or play. 

To negate my personal experiences as untrue or invalid isn't fair. Some may not care for my opinion, but I ask that you take it for what it is, an opinion that happens to be true to me. It is not politically correct to voice it, unless specifically asked, which it was.

Speaking as a non American who is often hesitant to post here, there is simply a cultural difference in communication style, that makes us think twice before we submit a post. My opinion is that most who live in a country in the commonwealth tend to communicate in a way that may come across as rude to others. Our humour and sarcasm specifically can be misinterpreted. I personally don't see it as being disingenuous, I actually see it as we care enough about other's feelings and thoughts to pause and reflect before hitting that submit button.

My country is often a target for such stereotypes, (ironically by Americans) and it is what is it, a stereotype. When I do see or hear it, I use it as a learning experience to either educate myself or others. 

Once again, I sincerely apologize if anything I said was offensive, it was honestly not my intent. I'll go back into my shell now.😉

 

 

 

I agree with you that political correctness isn't a virtue, but I doubt most people would apply this standard to other groups or situations.  If a black person posted an OP saying hey, what are some of the ways black people in America come across negatively and how can I change that in myself, I'd be hard pressed to believe that the thread would be full of people saying, well, in my experience you're all lazy, loud, violent, low IQ, degenerate, etc.  I just can't see the thread going that way, even if the opinion was asked for.

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50 minutes ago, mom2scouts said:

Really? I live in a community with a large university and I can't even remember the last time I saw someone wearing white sneakers. The only person I know who wears them regularly is my elderly mom.

Yeah, white sneakers have been a big fashion trend for the past couple years at least, and not just among college kids. Your mom is hip now!

https://footwearnews.com/2018/fashion/trends/white-sneaker-trend-predictions-fila-kswiss-1202667926/

 

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I’ve been to Rome a few times and to Paris once in the last few years. The dress of the men in those cities struck me as different more than the women. They seemed to put more care into their dress and appearance, especially the older men, compared to US men. Younger men in big US cities seem comparable though. Except for the scarves. Lots of men wearing scarves in Paris and Rome. Not so much here.
 

Older women there seemed to wear less makeup than US women on average, but still seemed quite attractive. The uniform of leggings, skinny jeans, boots and/or nice shoes, was alive and well for women there which didn’t seem different from here in the US.

Edited by livetoread
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A book that is very helpful to this thread is The Culture Map by Erin Meyer and it discusses loads of differences between lots of different cultures. A very important one is high context vs low context.

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On 1/14/2020 at 5:22 PM, wathe said:

Ha!  A Canadian will see through that in about 2 seconds.  (And then feel annoyed about Americans appropriating our brand.)

 

Ha, Sorry Wintermom. 9 pages is just too much. Sorry. I see I was just remembering a giant W and I don't know wathe just you. 🙂  

 

Not that I want to pretend to be Canadian but I have  liked most of the Canadians I've met. 🙂 

 

I generally call myself an Alaskan anyway when traveling. I don't say, "I'm an American. " I tend to say "I'm an Alaskan."  Not many other states do that. Maybe Texas 🤣 and Hawaiians?

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1 hour ago, Paige said:

I could be wrong, but I suspect the Australians would be less forthcoming about typical stereotypes about Sri Lankans. 

 

 A person from Sri Lanka is well aware that Australia knows about the ethnic cleansing and genocide that happened just a few years ago in their country.  We took many of the refugees from that genocide. We  Aussies wouldn’t need to stereotype, we would just state facts.

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16 hours ago, Liz CA said:

 

A little off topic but do they really think God has a special relationship with the US? Or could it be they view this country as "blessed" which is slightly different than "special relationship." Some things the Baptists have communicated in the past have had me blink twice but this sounds so..privileged - US is the golden haired child - kind of vibe. YKWIM?

That is a direct quote I have heard many, many times.  No, they don't mean general blessing, they mean the US has a special relationship with God that other nations, other than Israel, do not have.

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11 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

 I’m really disappointed in many of the comments here.  I’m sure that just makes me a rude, confident, rah rah fucking American though 🙄

 

No

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17 minutes ago, StellaM said:

 

No, but I'm gonna look for it now!

 

Episode was called “Squirrel Cop”. I can find it and looks like it’s available to play for free, but I cannot do a link . 

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9 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I genuinely want to know......what are "talking to american manners"

As an american who goes to Aus a lot and is married to one....

Australians tease and make fun of each other A LOT from my perspective.  They also use a lot of sarcasm.  Of course certain parts of the US use sarcasm too, but where I live it's used much less often and milder.  Anyway, all that can come across as a bit of bullying if you aren't used to it.   It's like many things with a cultural difference it's just the way it is, 

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6 hours ago, debinindy said:

 

How would it go over here if one said:

Every American on this board uses their talking to non-Americans manners on here.

Or if post #1 replaced American with any other country/culture of choice?  And people responded frankly and honestly.

I find the discussion quite interesting, but I do see why it may rankle some.

 

Try it and see.

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8 hours ago, KungFuPanda said:

We once took a hard pass on a chance to move to Australia for a few years.  I sometimes wonder if I should regret it, but at the time living in the middle of Australia didn't seem all that appealing.  It seemed like all of the fun stuff was at the edges. Maybe we SHOULD have given it a chance and we really missed out on a learning experience, but the risk of "getting stranded out there" should the contract go longer than anticipated seemed too great at the time.

 

Alice Springs?

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Australia is so popular with Americans.  Recently people have been contacting asking about the fires and if our family is ok.  Yes they are because their area burned last year.  

But, I recently found out my kids don't tell people dad is Australian because it completly derails the conversation.  I actually do this too.  My daughter has a friend group at school and has been friends with them since starting college for about 1.5 years.  She went to a party over Christmas break at one of the guys parents house who lives near hear and found out his mother was British, because that is almost as popular and he doesn't tell anyone either. LOL

One time we were in a shoe store and went to pay and I thought the stupid sales girl was going to come over the counter and jump on my husband!  It was ridiculous and embarrassing.

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In re Canada— as currently a USA PNWer, Western Canada and Canadians seem more similar in many ways than Eastern parts of USA (that I have also lived in). 

But I don’t know if Canadians feel like that. Maybe.  The back and forth across border used to be very easy.  I haven’t traveled in recent years, but I gather it is less easy now.  

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4 minutes ago, Pen said:

In re Canada— as currently a USA PNWer, Western Canada and Canadians seem more similar in many ways than Eastern parts of USA (that I have also lived in). 

But I don’t know if Canadians feel like that. Maybe.  The back and forth across border used to be very easy.  I haven’t traveled in recent years, but I gather it is less easy now.  

I'd agree that geographical proximity does make parts of Canada much more similar to parts of the US. For instance, the prairies in Canada are cold, pretty isolated, less populated and far from federal decision-makers. Seems to me that people in the Dakotas, Montana, Idaho and Minnesota probably have similar experiences.  I don't think there is a Canadian equivalent for the deep south, though. That is just very, very different in terms of climate, culture and history than what we've experienced.  

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1 minute ago, StellaM said:

Final comment.

I feel like this thread was a set up. 

Basically, there's nothing I should ever say to Americans except 'Yay you'.

Because that's all that every going to be accepted.

I feel sad and offended that answering a question about national stereotypes has posters saying that we (non US) just fake the care and concern we show for US boardies in hard times. 

And how freaking interesting that the thread  was forced to end with the non USians having to perform social apology before  reintergration into the 'community' can be considered.

Really, really disappointed in this thread.

Sadly, yes, it's a set up, but probably done with good intentions. No, you do not have to apologize, just talk about squirrels for a while. We North Americans are very easily distracted by squirrels. Both dogs and people. 😂

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46 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

I genuinely want to know......what are "talking to american manners"

 

You've seen all the comments that have triggered ire from Americans in this thread? We knew that would happen. "Talking to Americans manners" means not saying those things, even when asked. It means not saying anything that a significant number of Americans might find displeasing from a cultural standpoint. (As opposed to arguing about maths curriculum, for example.) It means knowing that a significant amount of Americans prefer non-Americans to display patriotism towards America and being neutral at worst on that topic. 

I seriously hurt someone's feelings once by making a joke about how gross pumpkin pie is a couple of years in a row. *This* is the first time I have said anything about pumpkin pie in years. She was devastated. About a joke about me not liking pumpkin pie.

Basically, I'm in Rome, so I don't say anything that I think any of the Romans might take offence to. It is my role here as a minority, to protect the feelings of the majority.

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9 hours ago, Arctic Mama said:

I appreciate the sentiment but answer me this, because this entire thread is jaw dropping from a number of people I wouldn’t have expected it from - is it considered polite, acceptable, or appropriate to stereotype people in your region or culture?  Like, in my little right of center Christian homeschooled sphere it isn’t okay to even joke about it, that’s considered gauche. And yet here is a giant thread of something I’d consider on par with making slant eyes at a Thai or Chinese immigrant or joking about screwing sheep with a Georgian farmer.

"Making slant eyes" at an Asian would be mocking someone to their face for what they look like, and "jokes" about farmers in Georgia having sex with sheep have no basis in reality, so neither of those is remotely on par with a discussion of how Americans, in general, tend to be perceived abroad, based on actual experiences of dealing with Americans abroad. A stereotype is, by definition, a widely held but somewhat exaggerated and oversimplified impression of a certain type of person or group of people.

The caveat of "not all Americans" should go without saying — and even then, many people who responded to the OP have bent over backwards to explicitly add those caveats, and yet people still managed to take it personally. Which is kind of ironic, since one of the stereotypes about Americans is that they can't handle any criticism of America or Americans. I mean we see that all the time even within America — there is a sizable percentage of the population who feel like any criticism, even from other Americans, is totally off limits: "love it or leave it," "If you don't like it here, move somewhere else," etc. — as if loving the country and acknowledging all the things that are wrong with it are mutually exclusive.

I lived abroad for 10 years and have traveled fairly extensively and I have seen and heard all of the "stereotypical American" behaviors that people are discussing here. The stereotype exists for a reason, it's not something people are making up that has no basis in reality. No, "not all Americans" are like that, but the truth is that a fair amount are. Why would I feel personally insulted by the stereotype when (1) I don't act like that, (2) no one has said or even implied that ALL Americans act like that, and (3) I find the behaviors described just as cringe-worthy as non-Americans do? 

 

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8 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Final comment.

I feel like this thread was a set up. 

Basically, there's nothing I should ever say to Americans except 'Yay you'.

Because that's all that every going to be accepted.

I feel sad and offended that answering a question about national stereotypes has posters saying that we (non US) just fake the care and concern we show for US boardies in hard times. 

And how freaking interesting that the thread  was forced to end with the non USians having to perform social apology before  reintergration into the 'community' can be considered.

Really, really disappointed in this thread.

 

I did not read every post, but missed that any apology was required.    🤔?

Im also not sure what is culturally common for Aus in re apologies.  

 

When I lived in England, I’d say “I’m sorry “ was a very common thing to say. Much more common than in USA.  I’m not sure it meant actually being sorry any more frequently— just a way of talking.

 

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10 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Final comment.

I feel like this thread was a set up. 

Basically, there's nothing I should ever say to Americans except 'Yay you'.

Because that's all that every going to be accepted.

I feel sad and offended that answering a question about national stereotypes has posters saying that we (non US) just fake the care and concern we show for US boardies in hard times. 

And how freaking interesting that the thread  was forced to end with the non USians having to perform social apology before  reintergration into the 'community' can be considered.

Really, really disappointed in this thread.

 

I didn’t see it that way.  I thought @fairfarmhand was seeking information to help seem less the “ugly American” when traveling.  

But I might have misunderstood. 

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1 minute ago, StellaM said:

 

The requirement, which was performed, was communicated pretty clearly.

 

I probably skipped both types of posts . 

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6 minutes ago, Pen said:

 

I didn’t see it that way.  I thought @fairfarmhand was seeking information to help seem less the “ugly American” when traveling.  

But I might have misunderstood. 

 

The OP didn't require appeasement. 

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12 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Final comment.

I feel like this thread was a set up. 

Basically, there's nothing I should ever say to Americans except 'Yay you'.

Because that's all that every going to be accepted.

I feel sad and offended that answering a question about national stereotypes has posters saying that we (non US) just fake the care and concern we show for US boardies in hard times. 

And how freaking interesting that the thread  was forced to end with the non USians having to perform social apology before  reintergration into the 'community' can be considered.

Really, really disappointed in this thread.

Tolerated as pets, that what y'all communicate. 

 

I don't think it was a set-up, I think it was an honest question, but maybe people weren't exactly expecting the answers they got. And to be fair, there are at least as many Americans on this thread who are agreeing with the nonAmericans and not taking offense at all. I was as surprised as you guys at some of the reactions — not because I don't see those kinds of reactions fairly commonly in this country (I see it all the time), but because I would not have expected those kinds of reactions in the context of this particular conversation on this particular board

I think a lot of the problem is that so few Americans travel abroad, and a significant percentage of those that do really have no interest in learning about other cultures — hence the preferences for cruise ships where you can eat American-style food and hang out with other Americans and treat other cultures kind of like a trip to Disneyland. [insert caveat: NOT ALL AMERICANS]. 

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1 minute ago, StellaM said:

Set up as in there was no way for any of us to answer honestly without opprobrium, not as in a set up by the OP.

All us non US people should have ignored it.

 

 

Find Squirrel Cop and maybe it will give you a laugh to help feel better.  Plus it is about good intentions leading to unfortunate results😉

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6 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Set up as in there was no way for any of us to answer honestly without opprobrium, not as in a set up by the OP.

All us non US people should have ignored it.

 

We could have gone to the "dark wtm forum" for non-Americans. 😂

By the way, there was a term used by Australians "bogan." I'd never heard the term, but Wiki had this local definition for me, which I'm sure is not the same as your definition! I have NEVER heard this used in Canada as either a creek or an indigenous person. I think wiki may be wrong.

bogan (plural bogans) (Canada) Any narrow water or creek, particularly a tranquil backwater. (Canada, North Western Ontario, slang, derogatory, offensive) An indigenous person.

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Just now, wintermom said:

We could have gone to the "dark wtm forum" for non-Americans. 😂

By the way, there was a term used by Australians "bogan." I'd never heard the term, but Wiki had this local definition for me, which I'm sure is not the same as your definition!

bogan (plural bogans) (Canada) Any narrow water or creek, particularly a tranquil backwater. (Canada, North Western Ontario, slang, derogatory, offensive) An indigenous person.

 

No, bogan in our dialect is the equivalent of  American trailer trash, without being a direct translation. It is definitely *not* a direct translation.

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7 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Set up as in there was no way for any of us to answer honestly without opprobrium, not as in a set up by the OP.

All us non US people should have ignored it.

 

 

Nah. Then the OP would have been hurt and we wouldn't have wanted to do that either.

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10 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

No, bogan in our dialect is the equivalent of  American trailer trash, without being a direct translation. It is definitely *not* a direct translation.

I'm not even sure what "American trailer trash" is. Ther visual is "people who live in trailers," but I think half of the Canadians who live in Florida live in trailers, and I don't think they are considered "trailer trash."  I saw some trailers off a highway in Nevada. We came up with the term for these, "unplanned communities." Or living off the grid.

This is what wiki has for Australian/New Zealand bogan. Is this how you use the term?

Bogan (/ˈboʊɡən/ BOHG-ən) is Australian and New Zealand slang for a person whose speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour are considered unrefined or unsophisticated. 

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Just now, wintermom said:

I'm not even sure what "American trailer trash" is. This is what wiki has for Australian/New Zealand bogan. Is this how you use the term?

Bogan (/ˈboʊɡən/ BOHG-ən) is Australian and New Zealand slang for a person whose speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour are considered unrefined or unsophisticated. 

 

A certain type of speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour, yeah. Being my scruffy, Aspie self isn't boganism.
It's a class thing, hence the term "cashed up bogan" for a bogan who is doing well financially but retains the same world view and priorities.

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This thread has been very interesting.

I love traveling overseas and I love learning about other cultures, especially the things that are done differently. 

I remember one time when I traveled to The Netherlands and spent the summer there with my then boyfriend. I jumped on my bike and pedaled into the town center around noon to buy something for lunch. Imagine my surprise when the grocery was closed as were the restaurants. I bike home and ask my boyfriend if it's a holiday. Not a holiday, he informs me, but what happens every weekday at lunch. The kids leave school, adults leave their jobs, and everyone goes home to eat lunch together. I could have complained and ranted, but I found it charming and quaint. Plus, I learned to head out to the market early.

My entire love of travel is because I don't want things to be the same as the U.S. If I wanted that, I wouldn't travel. However, I have witnessed on multiple trips the typical American stereotype mentioned here. I remember one instance on a train in Italy when a group of American couples were talking loudly and about American life to some Italians who asked. I remember sitting there thinking, "I wish they'd be quiet and stop saying things that aren't true about most Americans." They were wealthy Californians and what they were sharing as "normal" American life was in no way "normal". In fact, it came across as bragging and out of touch. Not to mention it was a night train and everyone was probably wanting to sleep. I even told my traveling companion, "I hope nobody figures out we're American and assumes we're with them."

For the most part I think Americans expect the world, especially first world countries, to be like the Americanized versions of those cultures or at the very least basically American, but with accents and older buildings. It's a lack of education about other cultures in our school system and a lack of cultural awareness and sensitivity due to our geographical isolation from most of the world and long fed diet of American exceptionalism (aka the world owes us).

My only complaint about overseas travel is the lack of ice in my water at restaurants. 😂 But I adapt while I'm there. I've also discovered I'm basically European at heart and the things other Americans complain about are my favorite things when I'm there. 

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1 hour ago, Mbelle said:

As an american who goes to Aus a lot and is married to one....

Australians tease and make fun of each other A LOT from my perspective.  They also use a lot of sarcasm.  Of course certain parts of the US use sarcasm too, but where I live it's used much less often and milder.  Anyway, all that can come across as a bit of bullying if you aren't used to it.   It's like many things with a cultural difference it's just the way it is.  

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13 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

A certain type of speech, clothing, attitude and behaviour, yeah. Being my scruffy, Aspie self isn't boganism.
It's a class thing, hence the term "cashed up bogan" for a bogan who is doing well financially but retains the same world view and priorities.

I don't think politically correct Canadians are supposed to have a term for that. If we do, it must always be followed by the correct, Canadian additive, "sorry." 😉  

The closest expression I can think of is "redneck." I'm not sure this is the same connotation though, because I see "redneck" as a handy person who can fix things with duct tape or the like. Usually a person with a red neck gets it from working outdoors, such as a farmer. And farmers are good at fixing things. I'm super literal. 

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2 minutes ago, Melissa in Australia said:

The quoted above,

 plus I am rural Australian, they tend to be a bit more straightforward in Conversation

 

The women, anyway.

Up here in Murray Basin Plan land, I'm surprised at what I'm seeing from the men. Or, rather, what I'm not seeing.

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2 minutes ago, wintermom said:

I don't think politically correct Canadians are supposed to have a term for that. If we do, it must always be followed by the correct, Canadian additive, "sorry." 😉  

The closest expression I can think of is "redneck." I'm not sure this is the same connotation though, because I see "redneck" as a handy person who can fix things with duct tape or the like. 

 

Nah, in our dialect, redneck and bogan are not synonymous. Bogan is very much an urban term.

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31 minutes ago, StellaM said:

Final comment.

I feel like this thread was a set up. 

Basically, there's nothing I should ever say to Americans except 'Yay you'.

Because that's all that every going to be accepted.

I feel sad and offended that answering a question about national stereotypes has posters saying that we (non US) just fake the care and concern we show for US boardies in hard times. 

And how freaking interesting that the thread  was forced to end with the non USians having to perform social apology before  reintergration into the 'community' can be considered.

Really, really disappointed in this thread.

Tolerated as pets, that what y'all communicate. 

As an American who has waded through this entire thread, I was utterly dumbfounded at the thin-skinned, defensive responses from many of my fellow countrymen. Many of those posts were the epitome of a stereotypical American response when anything approaching criticism is leveled at us.

I knew exactly what Rosie and others meant by “talking using American manners”. And I could predict how this thread would go. I’m still saddened that a question *by an American* elicited such defensiveness at the honest answers delivered by non-Americans in our community. (And not all of the non-American responders were from the English speaking,  western European sphere.) And, it must be said, some of the same posters who responded defensively have themselves used over generalizations and broad-brush paintings when posting about different groups in varying contexts. 

Of course stereotypes don’t describe everyone in a group. No one said they did. And all descriptions of a group don’t apply to all members in the group at all times and in all places. But stereotypes exist for a reason; general descriptions based on broad experiences exist for a reason. 

I don’t think you, Stella, or anyone else need apologize for your thoughts, perspectives, opinions, etc. I’m just one American; however, you don’t need to reintegrate into the community because in my humble view you (a) have nothing to apologize for and (b) weren’t ever outside the community. That’s probably my American arrogance showing, no? <— last directed at me with my tongue firmly in my cheek 😉

Personally, I don’t tolerate you; I very much appreciate your varied perspectives. Frankly, they’re desperately needed as we Americans can be, and many times are, incredibly myopic.

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27 minutes ago, Rosie_0801 said:

 

No, bogan in our dialect is the equivalent of  American trailer trash, without being a direct translation. It is definitely *not* a direct translation.

I know what a bogan is from reading the comments on the Australian Daily Mail. Lots of talk about bogans there...😂

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Just now, Rosie_0801 said:

 

Nah, in our dialect, redneck and bogan are not synonymous. Bogan is very much an urban term.

Bogan and redneck are not the same.  Redneck can just be country or could be hick but it's not bogan.  Trailer trash isn't quite right either.  My bogan rellies are all working in good jobs whereas trailer trash might not be working steadily.

 

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