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I am curious for reviews as well.  My daughter takes Greek through Lukeion, but it appears that CLRC moves more slowly through the same textbook.  My son has expressed interest in Greek, but the Lukeion pace is pretty quick.

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My dd hasn’t taken Greek through CLRC, but she’s taken Latin through CLRC and Lukeion and Anne VanFossen teaches the Latin at CLRC as well as the Greek. I can’t say enough wonderful things about Anne. She is very bright and dedicated to her students as well as being a kind and decent person. The biggest differences between the CLRC and Lukeion classes for my dd were:

- more scaffolding and accountability with Lukeion. My dd started CLRC’s Latin 4 in 9th grade and the focus was on translating, but the students didn’t turn in their complete translations. My dd didn’t realize that she needed to completely write them out. She was just reading and translating in her head for awhile. Lukeion requires those to be turned in and feedback and grading occurs. They also use quia for vocabulary and quiz practice.

- Classes were 2 hours long at CLRC vs 1 hour at Lukeion, which felt really long to my dd. However, classes were smaller, warmer and more personal at CLRC. An issue with CLRC is that Anne is very kind and doesn’t want to tell the students they are wrong. That led to some frustration for my dd. On the other hand, Anne was extremely receptive to any questions or concerns we had and always made time to fully delve into issues. Mrs. Barr is too busy for that in our experience.

I think both classes are great options, and that CLRC just expected the students to take more responsibility for their own learning, which my dd wasn’t expecting after her prior year with Lone Pine where there were tons of assignments to turn in and everything was graded. In the end, we switched to Lukeion mid-semester because of their reputation with AP Latin and taking that exam was my dd’s goal for 10th. I think Anne was just starting to offer AP Latin at that time.

PM me if you have any other questions.

 

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12 minutes ago, Mom0012 said:

My dd hasn’t taken Greek through CLRC, but she’s taken Latin through CLRC and Lukeion and Anne VanFossen teaches the Latin at CLRC as well as the Greek. I can’t say enough wonderful things about Anne. She is very bright and dedicated to her students as well as being a kind and decent person. The biggest differences between the CLRC and Lukeion classes for my dd were:

- more scaffolding and accountability with Lukeion. My dd started CLRC’s Latin 4 in 9th grade and the focus was on translating, but the students didn’t turn in their complete translations. My dd didn’t realize that she needed to completely write them out. She was just reading and translating in her head for awhile. Lukeion requires those to be turned in and feedback and grading occurs. They also use quia for vocabulary and quiz practice.

- Classes were 2 hours long at CLRC vs 1 hour at Lukeion, which felt really long to my dd. However, classes were smaller, warmer and more personal at CLRC. An issue with CLRC is that Anne is very kind and doesn’t want to tell the students they are wrong. That led to some frustration for my dd. On the other hand, Anne was extremely receptive to any questions or concerns we had and always made time to fully delve into issues. Mrs. Barr is too busy for that in our experience.

I think both classes are great options, and that CLRC just expected the students to take more responsibility for their own learning, which my dd wasn’t expecting after her prior year with Lone Pine where there were tons of assignments to turn in and everything was graded. In the end, we switched to Lukeion mid-semester because of their reputation with AP Latin and taking that exam was my dd’s goal for 10th. I think Anne was just starting to offer AP Latin at that time.

PM me if you have any other questions.

 

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Since you provided a review of Anne’s style at CLRC, I can add a bit about Lukeion Greek.  Mr. Barr teaches the Greek classes and he does require the translations to be turned in and has quia for vocabulary practice, but he doesn’t really seem to grade the translations that are turned in beyond the fact that they are completed on time.  The students go over them in class.  The Lukeion classes are one hour, but there is usually a one hour grammar lesson that they are expected to watch outside of class time at the early levels.  I know it was gone by level 3.  I agree that two hours is a really long time to concentrate in one stretch.  Like the difference between the Greeks and the Romans, Mr. Barr is generally more laid back than Mrs. Barr and slower on grading (especially at the upper levels).  There have been semesters that my daughter has gone into the final only knowing one or two test grades.  I do think if he sensed a problem that he would have said something.  She hasn’t needed to ask too many questions in Greek, but Mr. Barr has always been very responsive.  The classes are smaller than the Lukeion Latin sections.

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4 hours ago, Mom2mthj said:

Since you provided a review of Anne’s style at CLRC, I can add a bit about Lukeion Greek.  Mr. Barr teaches the Greek classes and he does require the translations to be turned in and has quia for vocabulary practice, but he doesn’t really seem to grade the translations that are turned in beyond the fact that they are completed on time.  The students go over them in class.  The Lukeion classes are one hour, but there is usually a one hour grammar lesson that they are expected to watch outside of class time at the early levels.  I know it was gone by level 3.  I agree that two hours is a really long time to concentrate in one stretch.  Like the difference between the Greeks and the Romans, Mr. Barr is generally more laid back than Mrs. Barr and slower on grading (especially at the upper levels).  There have been semesters that my daughter has gone into the final only knowing one or two test grades.  I do think if he sensed a problem that he would have said something.  She hasn’t needed to ask too many questions in Greek, but Mr. Barr has always been very responsive.  The classes are smaller than the Lukeion Latin sections.

Thank you. As I was writing my comments, I forgot that the original question was about Greek, lol. My dd did take Greek with Mr. Barr and would agree with Mom2mthj’s comments about the class.

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My daughter is a Latin student at CLRC and all of her homework, including translations, is turned in weekly and graded promptly. Teachers write helpful commebts and respond quickly to questions.

Anne Van Fossen is not the only Latin teacher at CLRC, but the course, including hw, is structured the same, regardless of teacher. 

CLRC uses Quizlet for online vocabulary drill, at least for Latin 1 and 2, last year and this.

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