Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

itsheresomewhere

Question/ Am I older than a dinosaur in my thinking on this?

Recommended Posts

Question here-  when did it become acceptable/normal to only watch your child at a recital/performance and leave?

I admit I am older than a dinosaur so maybe my thinking is a dinosaur on this.  I got into a debate with some homeschoolers who find it perfectly acceptable to only watch their child for a recital/performance and leave.  How it got started was several parents had a fit because their kids where in the middle of an 1.5 hour recital/performance and they wanted them to be at the beginning so they could leave.  Not for an appointment or anything, but why should they watch someone else’s child perform.  The other parents have informed me that I am way off base here and why would anyone stay to watch someone others kids perform.   So what is it like in your area- do you stay or is common to leave? 

Edited by itsheresomewhere
  • Confused 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, itsheresomewhere said:

Question here-  when did it become acceptable/normal to only watch your child at a recital/performance and leave?

I admit I am older than a dinosaur so maybe my thinking is a dinosaur on this.  I got into a debate with some homeschoolers who find it perfectly acceptable to only watch their child for a recital/performance and leave.  How it got started was several parents had a fit because their kids where in the middle of an 1.5 hour recital/performance and they wanted them to be at the beginning so they could leave.  Not for an appointment or anything, but why should they watch someone else’s child perform.  The other parents have informed me that I am way off base here and why would anyone stay to watch someone others kids perform.   So what is it like in your area- do you stay or is common to leave? 

Whenever my kids did school programs/recitals/whatever....I always left after my kid was done.  In most cases, the situation was that my oldest was in the performance and I had my younger kids with me.  I promise no one wanted me to keep a baby and a 2 yr old in a 2.5 hour performance if my kid was finished the first half hour.  They get bored, they get hungry, they want to see their sister, the music gets loud sometimes, they are tired, and on and on and on.

If parents don't have young kids there and the ability to stay, I think it's great to do so.  But short of a very expensive professional performance, I have no issue with parents wanting to leave, for any reason.  Kids at home, spouse at home, tired, just had dental surgery, have to get up early the next day, whatever.   It doesn't bother me at all.  And really, when my kid was performing, the only people she cared about seeing her was us anyway.  

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay!  Everyone deserves the same size audience.

Does no one teach these types of manners?

Dinosaurs unite!

Edited by happi duck
  • Like 30

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, itsheresomewhere said:

Question here-  when did it become acceptable/normal to only watch your child at a recital/performance and leave?

I admit I am older than a dinosaur so maybe my thinking is a dinosaur on this.  I got into a debate with some homeschoolers who find it perfectly acceptable to only watch their child for a recital/performance and leave.  How it got started was several parents had a fit because their kids where in the middle of an 1.5 hour recital/performance and they wanted them to be at the beginning so they could leave.  Not for an appointment or anything, but why should they watch someone else’s child perform.  The other parents have informed me that I am way off base here and why would anyone stay to watch someone others kids perform.   So what is it like in your area- do you stay or is common to leave? 

Nope. Not a dinosaur. All the kids in the performance have worked hard, and it is disrespectful to get up and walk out, especially without a pressing reason. And yes, I've sat through my share of miserable first-year music performances. 

If it is an exceptionally long event, an intermission should be held to allow the audience to take a break, and perhaps leave if necessary.

  • Like 20

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay. The whole point of the thing is to give kids a nice, non-threatening taste of performing for a group. Mom and dad have already heard that piece eleventy-billion times. It is also a safe place to practice sitting quietly and attentively for the (no more than 1) hour (if the teacher know what s/he is doing).

Not aimed at you Happysmiley, I also appreciate parents who know when it is time to exit.

  • Like 15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay if at all possible. 

Now, I will say, when I had babies and toddlers, I did not stay for aaaaalllll of Talent Night at co-op, but it is also true they scheduled it in such a manner that youngest kids performed first because there is a certain reasonableness in not staying until the last hurrah if you have babies. But in general, yes, there should be roughly the same audience for all performers. I also got a lot of joy out of celebrating the talents and skills of all the kids, not just my own. 

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always stayed, even though I really really wanted to leave the second my kids were done.🙂

  • Like 7
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There have always been people who act like that. Louts. They ought to focus more on teaching their kids manners than teaching them dance (or whatever).

Edit: Obviously, of course, there is an exception for people who need to leave. But you know yourself whether you need to leave (because your littlest can't take it or for whatever other reason) or if you just can't be bothered.

Edited by Tanaqui
  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

 And really, when my kid was performing, the only people she cared about seeing her was us anyway.  

I think lots of kids would be bothered by a constantly shrinking audience that amounted to their family and a bunch of empty chairs by the time they performed. Very anticlimactic, no thunderous applause, and could have performed for mom and dad in the living room, lol. 

By all means, leave with crying babies. However, if you have the ability to stay for an expensive performance, you likewise have the ability to stay for a free or cheap performance. (general you, not YOU)

  • Like 22

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay. Jeepers. The last kid deserves an audience as much as the first kid. 

signed, the parent of a distance swimmer who once swam a mile for a coach, a parent and a janitor. Oh, and a grumpy official whose kid was pouting in the locker room.

Someday your kid will be the last one. And be sad that no one was there to see them.
 

  • Like 25

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ime, having an audience makes for a different experience, sort of a "performance gear" that needs an audience to happen.

  • Like 10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have lived through at least 25 years of kid performances.  And either my husband or I did leave a few times when the younger ones were babies and toddlers.   But the other one of us stayed for the entire evening.   I always told my kids that if they were old enough to be in the show, they were old enough to watch everyone else.  To this day, it hurts me when my friends leave after their kids have performed but before mine have had their turn.  

Each time another showcase comes around, I want to come at intermission, miss the little kids, and just come for the portion that involves my high-school aged kids and their friends.  But I don't - because that seems rude, and a bad example for my teenagers.

Count me in as one more of the dinosaurs.  

  • Like 17

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel like there are two separate issues here.  One is whether it's rude to leave.  I think that depends on both the reason you're leaving (e.g. a toddler who just can't make it, or you're performing brain surgery tomorrow and need your sleep), and how that leaving is pulled off.  I think that walking out while the next number is going on, and blocking people etc . . . is inexcusable unless you get a text that a kidney is available (I'm exaggerating.  One the other hand, I think that sitting in the back because you know you'll sneak out when the baby gets fussy, or taking advantage of a break in the performance, whether it's an intermission or the 3 minutes when the orchestra files out and the choir arranges themselves, is much more reasonable.

But the other issue is that even if you've decided that you will sneak out if the opportunity presents itself, I can't imagine having a fit because my kid wasn't first.  You get what you get and you don't get upset.  Unless it's truly bad scheduling, like they put the oldest kids first and asked the 5 year olds to go on at 10 p.m., there's no excuse for that.  

  • Like 11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a dinosaur as well. We stay. We sat through a 3 1/2 hour recital for my middle DD one time; I don't know what the teacher was thinking. I honestly thought it was going to go on for days. There seemed no end to the parade of children playing piano both badly and well. Just child after child after child...

 

  • Like 4
  • Haha 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I feel like there are two separate issues here.  One is whether it's rude to leave.  I think that depends on both the reason you're leaving (e.g. a toddler who just can't make it, or you're performing brain surgery tomorrow and need your sleep), and how that leaving is pulled off.  I think that walking out while the next number is going on, and blocking people etc . . . is inexcusable unless you get a text that a kidney is available (I'm exaggerating.  One the other hand, I think that sitting in the back because you know you'll sneak out when the baby gets fussy, or taking advantage of a break in the performance, whether it's an intermission or the 3 minutes when the orchestra files out and the choir arranges themselves, is much more reasonable.

But the other issue is that even if you've decided that you will sneak out if the opportunity presents itself, I can't imagine having a fit because my kid wasn't first.  You get what you get and you don't get upset.  Unless it's truly bad scheduling, like they put the oldest kids first and asked the 5 year olds to go on at 10 p.m., there's no excuse for that.  

The performance/recital was from 3-4:30.  All kids who were young or had anxiety issues were scheduled to be in the first 10. The youngest child from one of the moms getting upset was 6.   I

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, itsheresomewhere said:

The performance/recital was from 3-4:30.  All kids who were young or had anxiety issues were scheduled to be in the first 10. The youngest child from one of the moms getting upset was 6.   I


Yeah, I can see kind of wishing my kid went first, but I can't condone complaining about it to another person, except maybe my spouse.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a dinosaur.  In most cases, the audience should stay for the entire performance.  Those who must leave early for any reason other than a crying or unruly child, should leave at intermission or at least between performances.   Also, those who must leave early or suspect they will need to remove a crying or unruly child should sit in aisle seats near an exit. They should exit as quickly and quietly as possible.   Save the scolding for later.

 

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, itsheresomewhere said:

The performance/recital was from 3-4:30.  All kids who were young or had anxiety issues were scheduled to be in the first 10. The youngest child from one of the moms getting upset was 6.   I

Yeah, they are being whiney butts then.  Kids 6 and up should generally be able to handle watching a program for an hour and a half.  ETA: especially at 3 in the afternoon.  And 4:30 end time is still plenty of time to get dinner together at a reasonable time too.  

Edited by happysmileylady
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, itsheresomewhere said:

Question here-  when did it become acceptable/normal to only watch your child at a recital/performance and leave?

I admit I am older than a dinosaur so maybe my thinking is a dinosaur on this.  I got into a debate with some homeschoolers who find it perfectly acceptable to only watch their child for a recital/performance and leave.  How it got started was several parents had a fit because their kids where in the middle of an 1.5 hour recital/performance and they wanted them to be at the beginning so they could leave.  Not for an appointment or anything, but why should they watch someone else’s child perform.  The other parents have informed me that I am way off base here and why would anyone stay to watch someone others kids perform.   So what is it like in your area- do you stay or is common to leave? 

 

Stay - unless mitigating special circumstances.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless it is an emergency or a gigantic festival where you wouldn’t be missed and it goes for hours, staying is the best choice.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In our area, it's expected that you stay. 

It's also expected that recitals/performances are somewhat rare events--hopefully no more than one a semester.

I'm guessing the 3-4:30 moms had other places to be with other kids and weren't taking the event seriously.  I'm finding this dynamic more. Everyone has their kid in a bazillion things and they just act like a shuttle service from 3-9 pm bouncing back and forth all over town and eating takeout.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We go to one of the largest and oldest community music programs in the country.  And from the start, kids are taught to be good audience members.  Even if there is a younger sibling that can't sit, one parent might tag team the lobby with the kid in the concert.  They reinforce it in lessons and classes and announce concert protocol at the beginning.  They put the oldest most advanced players at the end typically.   They do work hard to keep most performances to an hour.  

There are exceptions made.  But we always spoke to the teacher ahead of time.  My son who is now studying music in college maybe left a concert early a handfull of times in 13 years of lessons. And he performed a lot (he does theater too - that's a whole other ballgame).  His sister was 2 when he started and she was sitting quietly through hour long recitals with crayons by 3 or so.  They don't expect perfection from the younger audience members.  But they do expect training to be happening.  And it's WAY easier for younger kids when older kids are modeling the behavior.  

Anyway - I think that is completely rude and disrespectful to do on a regular basis.  I actually LOVE to sit through most recitals.  Little kids playing makes me cry now - so cute!  And I've loved watching kids progress over the years.  

  • Like 8
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, prairiewindmomma said:

In our area, it's expected that you stay. 

It's also expected that recitals/performances are somewhat rare events--hopefully no more than one a semester.

I'm guessing the 3-4:30 moms had other places to be with other kids and weren't taking the event seriously.  I'm finding this dynamic more. Everyone has their kid in a bazillion things and they just act like a shuttle service from 3-9 pm bouncing back and forth all over town and eating takeout.

I asked these moms and no they had no where to go.  They actually said why would we stay and watch kids who are not our own. 
 

 

Edited by itsheresomewhere
  • Confused 4
  • Sad 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ugh yes, everyone should stay and watch all performers. There are behavioral expectations for the audience!  It is very rude to attend a formal group recital and leave once your child is done, and yet I see this all the time and across all levels of performance. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, itsheresomewhere said:

I asked these moms and no they had no where to go.  They actually said why would we stay and watch kids who are not our own. 

I just don't get this at all.  Super self absorbed thought process to me.  My kids music studios have been like communities  to us over the years.  I really think the younger performer look up to the older performers.  My son has had little boys walk up to him and say "I want to play like you when I get older".  Older kids get to be leaders and model good behavior.  To me that's an important part of the whole process.    Such poor messaging to your child about respect and you're taking away possible role models  and inspiration.  Being a good supportive audience member and listener is a good life skill too.  When my kids were younger, we'd talk about recitals and which pieces we liked and we'd look them up, etc.

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Piano recitals, I stay. Band concert at the school, I leave. They do JH band stuff first, then HS. I leave after JH. We aren't the only ones who leave then, so I assume it is okay there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We did a few preschool performances for Christmas or "graduation", but it was just the preschool class doing it not the whole school, so no real leaving possibilities.  We never did public school performances.

DD did dance for many years.  Her first studio had the younger kids do the first half, and older after the intermission.  It was encouraged for families to stay for the whole thing, but many left because their kid was done.  They were also asked to pick up their child at intermission which I am sure contributed.  We always had DD come watch the big kids, and she loved it.  It felt rude for the families to leave early, although I never minded it being a bit less crowded.

The new studio didn't separate by age groups for the performance.  It was all mixed together, often with a overarching theme.  So, you couldn't just pick up a kid mid-recital (I am sure they would make exceptions for special circumstances).  Everyone stayed to the end.  I liked that a lot better.  The littles always had activities to do backstage to keep them entertained.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, MysteryJen said:

Stay. Jeepers. The last kid deserves an audience as much as the first kid. 

signed, the parent of a distance swimmer who once swam a mile for a coach, a parent and a janitor. Oh, and a grumpy official whose kid was pouting in the locker room.

Someday your kid will be the last one. And be sad that no one was there to see them.
 


I feel like sports are completely different. 
 

My son plays baseball.  Two games a week, three seasons a year.  That’s a lot of baseball.  I don’t think twice about taking my younger kid to nearby playground and asking a friend to text me if he got off the bench so I could rush back, or leaving half way through for a younger sibling’s bedtime.  because 80 games is a lot of time!  Same kid does band and choir and musical theater, and unless you count church that’s like 10 shows a year combined.

Plus the point of the concert is the audience.  The point of the race is the time or the win.

I think teammates should stay, and coaches on all the teams should stay to see that last swimmer, but I also know as the aunt of a high school runner, a meet can last 8 hours.  I couldn’t do that week after week.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thinking back on this, when I was a kid our dance center managed to avoid this problem by insisting that every class except the babies take part in the grand finale at the end. It wasn't until adulthood that I understood why they made us all do that.

And yeah, other than the babies going first, it was all split up - your age-grouped tap class might be near the beginning, the same age-grouped ballet class just before the intermission, and the same age-grouped jazz class might be near the end. This was ostensibly to give us all time to change, but in retrospect I wonder if this was also to keep butts in seats.

  • Like 8
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I had kids in public school, I saw this all the time. It was annoying because people rarely left quickly and quietly. There were a few times I had to leave early with a baby or because I needed to pick up another child at an activity, but I always felt bad and didn't make it a habit. If I knew I had to leave, I tried to sit somewhere near the door at the end of an aisle. 

Now I usually only go to my dd's dance recital. Our studio owner does everything professionally, has it down to a science, and nobody is leaving early from that show. Other than preschoolers, all dancers are in a backstage area that nobody without volunteer ID for that night can access and she has a police officer there to enforce it! Unless there's a true emergency, nobody is able to take their child before the end of the show. I guess grandma or aunt could leave during the show or someone with a preschooler could sneak out, but if a dancer left during the show, they would probably need to find a new studio.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Thinking back on this, when I was a kid our dance center managed to avoid this problem by insisting that every class except the babies take part in the grand finale at the end. It wasn't until adulthood that I understood why they made us all do that.

 

This is what ours has always done. Grand Finale= Everyone. If your kid can't stay to be in it, you're out of the recital. It's all or nothing, which is fine with me, because otherwise they would drop like flies, and some of the classes are really small- they should still get applause!  The audience dramatically thins after intermission anyway, but I get having young kids, or older grandparents or what have you needing to leave. At least the finale ensures a fair portion is there for all of the acts. 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the ones having a fit because they were inconvenienced that their child wasn't first - so they could leave - are the ones in the wrong.  they're quite gauche.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always tried to stay for the entire recital - especially with the violin as the advanced students sounded amazing! It's also planting the seed with my dc of songs they may soon be playing. When they've already heard the pieces, they enjoyed learning them more and they learned them faster. It's motivating and educational for your younger students. 

Having said this, I would much rather people just leave if they are only going to stay and read texts and stuff. That is equally rude, and has the potential to be distracting for others trying to watch the performances. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is normal to stay. If you must leave (small restless babies and toddlers, other child's performance got scheduled for the same evening across town, etc.) sit near the back along an aisle so you can leave unobtrusively.

Expecting your child's performance to be moved to the beginning because you just don't happen to want to sit through others is exceedingly rude.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You stay, but...

At dd's voice recitals, people get up and take family pics while their kid is singing.  Then they all leave when finished.  As a parent and former musician, a basic human being with manners, I find this highly annoying and disrespectful.  There is usually a break between groups, and I can understand leaving then if necessary, but still...   Maybe it is the new norm.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dinosaur here.

I go to performances where my kids aren't involved. I go to support other kids we know and to support the activities themselves (when I have to pay to get in).

Shocking.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course you stay, but it is also good manners for the recital director to arrange the performance(s) so that little kids are not in a three-hour (or longer!) performance.  When my girls were littles in ballet, the many, many little girls' performances were split between two recitals.  The older girls performed in both, and their parents came to one (but all of one).  It was a sane approach.  The OP's 1.5 hours seems reasonable; but an all-class ballet recital would have been four hours long!

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our teacher made this a rule a long time ago (she's been teaching 30+ years) because her son (in another studio) was always the last to perform, and by then nearly everyone would leave.  Not a new occurrence.

I would ask the teacher to make it a rule.  But people with crying babies should be in the hall or get a sitter.

@beckyjo My peeve, no one should be playing badly.  Teachers and parents need to encourage kids to play something they know well, not their latest piece. My daughter's studio's recitals are inspiring because everyone, even the littlest do not perform until they do it well, even if they only bow at a recital.  My middle son's studio's recitals are rather unpleasant because more than half of the kids are unprepared, play badly, then get embarrassed.  It is like they are trying to give the kids insecurity and stage fright.  

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last dance recital I went to started off packed and by the end had less than 20 people left.  Hundreds of people left.  I was so furious.  I made my kid quit dance after that because I was so angry at the culture of the studio. 

  • Sad 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's rude to leave.  That said, obviously if you have an unhappy toddler, by all means GO!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nope not a dinosaur.  not leaving is the right thing to do. I think it's sad that they have to explain this etiquette at the beginning of every program, show and concert.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another vote that obviously you stay unless there's a health, baby, etc. reason not to.

The social contract is that everyone stays for the performance and in return, the studio/teacher/school doesn't let it be interminably long and breaks up the children who have just learned to play their first violin piece with children who can actually play so that our ears can recover.

I don't think any of us are dinosaurs for thinking this. I've been to a lot of things like this over the years and I've never seen everyone leave. Maybe a few people duck out, but generally they clearly have young kids. In other words, I don't think we should all bemoan everyone's manners. I think we should all insist that this is the norm and people who don't do that (again, unless they have a reason) are the weird ones. Because they are. Like, some norms change, but I really don't think this one has. I'm sure there are pockets of horrible rude parents and bad schools and studios, but really.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At my dd’s dance recitals that always happens. They ask people to stay until intermission at least and most comply but there are always those that get up as soon as their little ones are done. 
 

It’s a mixed bag though. The studio does not need to make the recitals so freaking long. And they have those little kids in for so many late nights and recitals in the week leading up to the show. Those families with little ones are exhausted. So reason had already gone by the wayside.

My most recent experience has been attending dance recitals and they have been oppressively long. I think the people in charge could head some of this off by making shows a reasonable length. 

I have a big kid so she is always in the finale and most people have left but I can hardly blame them.

But I do agree with you, OP. But I tend to notice people being self absorbed in all kinds of ways. I don’t know if it is getting worse or I am just noticing it more as I age.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Farrar said:

and breaks up the children who have just learned to play their first violin piece with children who can actually play so that our ears can recover.

 

 

See, I have to disagree with you here.  I've been to a number of recitals that include relatively unskilled performers, and my preference is when they go from worst to best, so that when you get home, you only remember the last 1/3, even if your own kid was second.

This approach also solves the problem of people wanting to go early because then they'd have to admit publicly that their precious child isn't a prodigy.  Although actually, I think the studio that does it that way does it by the length of time you've studied.  I don't think they're actually ranking kids and telling them "you're before Fred because he's better than you". 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, itsheresomewhere said:

Question here-  when did it become acceptable/normal to only watch your child at a recital/performance and leave?

In my book--never! That's just plain rude!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recently the trend where we've lived is to have piano recitals in the mall before Christmas.  They last from 10am-8pm on a Saturday.  For that type of recital I'm not staying.

For a quiet room or auditorium and a 90 minute performance I'll stay for the whole thing.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Katy said:

Recently the trend where we've lived is to have piano recitals in the mall before Christmas.  They last from 10am-8pm on a Saturday.  For that type of recital I'm not staying.

For a quiet room or auditorium and a 90 minute performance I'll stay for the whole thing.

Oh. Interesting. Once we had a recital that was sort of a recital and sort of a concert for older folks in a senior living home. That also didn't feel like a situation where we all needed to stay.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stay!

ALL the kids work hard to polish their performances and each one deserves an audience. It is rude to leave in the middle.

I think it’s important for every student to stay and watch, because  recitals usually progress from novice to more skilled participants. It helps younger pupils have a vision of where they’re going as they continue their studies.

We have noticed it in the last year and this for recitals of middle and high schoolers where there aren’t any toddlers around to melt down. The same folks are characterized by it, so it’s not due to exceptional circumstances - they just don’t appear to be interested in anyone else. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...