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I have to admit I like The Hobbit and LotR.  Actually planning to reread in 2020 so will see how I feel in a few months.

I can’t seem to finish anything by Jane Austen but like the adaptions and the movies.

Edited by mumto2

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Moby Dick - I tried, really I tried...got about 3/4 done but just couldn't make myself finish. 

Harry Potter

Outlander - that one made me mad.  

DaVinci Code.

Another one for The Happiness Project

Infinite Jest (why is this book a thing??)

 

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1 hour ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Twilight and whatever that S&M series for women 10 years ago that got made into a movie was almost the line in the sand of friendships for me. Women I knew who hadn't read in YEARS read those books and thought they were amazing. I liked them better when they were unread. 

 

Fifty Shades of Gray, which I think was originally Twilight fanfic or something of the sort.

And seriously, if you want to read kinky dubcon, have fun! But don't pretend that it's healthy when it's not (what's described in the book is not safe, nor sane, and don't get me started on the consent issues) and don't pretend the writing is all that when, again, it's not. You're not reading that book for the literary value anyway, and everybody knows it.

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7 minutes ago, NorthwestMom said:

I agree with you all on so many of these.

I recently found Where the Crawdads Sing to be full of one-dimensional characters. 

 

I had so many people recommend that book and I ended up disappointed. It wasn't awful but I also didn't think it worthy of the praise I was hearing either.

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11 minutes ago, Teaching3bears said:

The god of small things

One Hundred Years of Solitude

The catcher in the rye

I finished them but did not enjoy them.

Add me to not getting Catcher in the Rye- my bff found it lifechanging when we were teens and told me I had to read it and I seriously did not care for it at all. But she was so wrapped up in it I felt horrible to tell her it wasn’t in my top anything. Good thing there wasn’t GoodReads back then to have to rate it! 

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Well, like mumto2, I adore Tolkien's writing. 😄 And I find Lord of the Rings to be incredibly powerful and moving, with so many rich  "life lessons" and spiritual depth about the Christian walk of faith. I've read the trilogy close to 2 dozen times, and have twice taught a year-long LotR Lit. & Comp. class (teaching it again next year, woo-hoo!), and every single time I read and/or teach it, I find new treasures to savor. 😉

And -- I do have a quibble with Terabith's "not exactly well-written" assessment. Tolkien was a philologist, so his rich vocabulary and precise word choices actually are strong support that something is well-written. And he was consciously echoing some of the medieval epic poetry techniques in his writing -- especially the use of alliteration, rhythm, and other sound devices -- again, another sign that the work was well-written, when you can successfully add poetic depth to your prose writing.

However, I'll totally accept the opinion that a person does not care for Tolkien's writing style, or that a person prefers fantasy writing that is more plot-driven, or has more fast-paced action, or about sudden twists, which tends to be the writing style of many contemporary fantasy books. And none of that is part of Tolkien's style. Nor his stated purpose (which was to build a world and inhabit with the peoples / cultures / histories and their stories so that they would speak his invented languages).

I think we sometimes forget that Tolkien was the innovator, and truly "kicked off" the modern adult fantasy genre.

End of quibble, and I DO respect your personal dislike of Tolkien's trilogy, Terabith. 😉 

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I think we sometimes forget that Tolkien was the innovator, and truly "kicked off" the modern adult fantasy genre.

 

And consequently, many of the things he did which were new and innovative are now expected and almost cliche. That's often the way - we build so much on the proverbial shoulders of giants that the giants themselves seem to shrink.

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52 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Add me to not getting Catcher in the Rye- my bff found it lifechanging when we were teens and told me I had to read it and I seriously did not care for it at all. But she was so wrapped up in it I felt horrible to tell her it wasn’t in my top anything. Good thing there wasn’t GoodReads back then to have to rate it! 

Me three. Eye rolling drivel, I didn’t like it at all.  

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34 minutes ago, Lori D. said:

Well, like mumto2, I adore Tolkien's writing. 😄 And I find Lord of the Rings to be incredibly powerful and moving, with so many rich  "life lessons" and spiritual depth about the Christian walk of faith. I've read the trilogy close to 2 dozen times, and have twice taught a year-long LotR Lit. & Comp. class (teaching it again next year, woo-hoo!), and every single time I read and/or teach it, I find new treasures to savor. 😉

And -- I do have a quibble with Terabith's "not exactly well-written" assessment. Tolkien was a philologist, so his rich vocabulary and precise word choices actually are strong support that something is well-written. And he was consciously echoing some of the medieval epic poetry techniques in his writing -- especially the use of alliteration, rhythm, and other sound devices -- again, another sign that the work was well-written, when you can successfully add poetic depth to your prose writing.

However, I'll totally accept the opinion that a person does not care for Tolkien's writing style, or that a person prefers fantasy writing that is more plot-driven, or has more fast-paced action, or about sudden twists, which tends to be the writing style of many contemporary fantasy books. And none of that is part of Tolkien's style. Nor his stated purpose (which was to build a world and inhabit with the peoples / cultures / histories and their stories so that they would speak his invented languages).

I think we sometimes forget that Tolkien was the innovator, and truly "kicked off" the modern adult fantasy genre.

End of quibble, and I DO respect your personal dislike of Tolkien's trilogy, Terabith. 😉 

That’s entirely fair.  I think I came to them too late in life and having read too much fantasy.  And while reading it, I felt like his philological concerns really hampered the flow.  Which is totally a preference issue, but he IS a master.  
 

I have never understood Catcher in the Rye. Even as a teen, I felt like it combined boring with melodrama.  
 

Actually felt the same way about Jane Austen, but at least with her books, I felt like she was a master but I hated her characters.  Just not my cup of tea.  
 

Couldn’t get into Outlander either, and I am a sucker for time travel books. 

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1 hour ago, NorthwestMom said:

I agree with you all on so many of these.

I recently found Where the Crawdads Sing to be full of one-dimensional characters. 

 

 

1 hour ago, Joker said:

I had so many people recommend that book and I ended up disappointed. It wasn't awful but I also didn't think it worthy of the praise I was hearing either.

I didn’t like it, either.

Jane Austin bores me, and Hemingway.... I just couldn’t even understand what he was talking about. I think I read the first chapter of Farewell to Arms 3 times and still hadn’t the slightest idea what it was even about. 

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1 hour ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

Add me to not getting Catcher in the Rye- my bff found it lifechanging when we were teens and told me I had to read it and I seriously did not care for it at all. But she was so wrapped up in it I felt horrible to tell her it wasn’t in my top anything. Good thing there wasn’t GoodReads back then to have to rate it! 

Catcher in the Rye is one of my most-hated books of all time.  I totally don't get it.

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36 minutes ago, Terabith said:

That’s entirely fair.  I think I came to them too late in life and having read too much fantasy.  And while reading it, I felt like his philological concerns really hampered the flow.  Which is totally a preference issue, but he IS a master...


That is totally understandable. I have a similar difficulty in that while I love sci-fi, I'm not really a fan of Jules Verne -- who, along with HG Wells, is one of the "fathers" of the sci-fi genre. I wish I did find his works more interesting, but alas, too much sci-fi under the reading bridge to be able to fully appreciate/enjoy Verne...

36 minutes ago, Terabith said:

...Catcher in the Rye. Even as a teen, I felt like it combined boring with melodrama.  


lol -- That was my reaction, too. I read it in my early 20s. At the time, I thought the problem was that I must have missed the window of opportunity for clicking with it (that it's a book that resonates with teens) -- but it sounds like, no, it's the book. 😉 🤣

Edited by Lori D.
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7 hours ago, MEmama said:

Harry Potter. 

Sorry. I just don’t get the love. 

I loved the books. I get the love. I had a very enjoyable summer reading them. I don’t get making them a religion. I swear the early days of Dianetics must have looked  just like this. 

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15 hours ago, Pawz4me said:

The Goldfinch

Hate both of her books. I can't believe that I read two of them. The worst part is that I can't get parts of them out of my head. 

15 hours ago, happi duck said:

I tried Outlander because of threads here and never could get into it.

I couldn't get beyond two chapters. Hated it. 

14 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

LotR.  . . . my children' consider it heresy.  I just couldn't' get into them.  They forced me to watch the movies - ok, final credits are rolling, can I leave now?

I've never been able to appreciate Tolkien. 

13 hours ago, hjffkj said:

The Happiness Project. I hated that book so much. They way she spoke about marriage made me just stop reading it. I hated it so much that I refuse to read her other books that people also highly recommend

Can't stand that book!

Other books that may have not been mentioned yet:

Any of the Twilight books

Water for Elephants

The Alchemist -  to me, the idea has been sort of plagiarized/copied from the children's book, "The Treasure", they're both very similar, except "The Treasure" was written first

Watership Down

Picnic at Hanging Rock

The Immotal Life of Henrietta Lacks 

We Have Always Lived in the Castle and The Lottery

The Power of Now

Speak

The Thornbirds

Love You Forever

The Giving Tree

Pretty much anything by Dan Brown

The Hunger Games

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3 hours ago, NorthwestMom said:

I agree with you all on so many of these.

I recently found Where the Crawdads Sing to be full of one-dimensional characters. 

 

 

I loved the setting and the premise, but most of the characters were stereotypes and I found the ending predictable. No spoilers, but did it take you very long to figure out whodunit?

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3 hours ago, Bluegoat said:

I hate some of the ones you guys mentioned, The Kite Runner, and I really dislike the Harry Potter books.

I also hate almost every Margaret Atwood book.  

Re; Stephen King, there seems to have been a period in the 80s/early 90s where they wanted to add a lot of sex to novels, I seem to remember reading that publishers insisted on a few steamy scenes per book.  Though I don't think that explains the bit in It, I think that was supposed to be something else.

Preach it. The reason I absolutely rocked English the year we covered The Stone Angel was because I cared so little about the book I was able to concentrate solely on symbolism and themes.

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5 hours ago, arctic_bunny said:

Preach it. The reason I absolutely rocked English the year we covered The Stone Angel was because I cared so little about the book I was able to concentrate solely on symbolism and themes.

That was me with The English Patient 🤣

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Little House - so disappointed and after I used up a bunch of Audible points to get all the books. I was able to refund a few books. 
 

You guys are making me nervous about a LotR year next year. Ds is listening to The Hobbit on his own I I guess that’s a good sign. 
 

Wuthering Heights. That book would have been better if it had stopped halfway through. It was still so creepy. 
 

I stopped reading Stephan King after high school though we really enjoyed Castle Rock on Hulu. It references all of those books I read back then. Yet I still don’t have any interest in rereading them. 
 

I really liked Dean Koontz in high school and a little after. A couple of years ago I was looking for some audiobooks to listen to while doing chores and found Odd Thomas. First book was great, the next was ok and I didn’t finish the rest of the series. 

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My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durell. The way the kids spoke to their mom rubbed me SUCH the wrong way that I threw the book across the room. lol

 

(I have set the goal of reading the Harry Potter series, but I'm kind of already floundering in only the second book. Someone encourage me to keep reading...)

 

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Outlander.

Also Outlander.

Oh, and Outlander.

Seriously, that book should have been 100% right up my alley. I even tried the show, thinking maybe it would get me over the hump. But geesh, it was awful.

I'm generally not that picky. I appreciate the classics, even if they aren't the most entertaining things I've ever read, and I can enjoy cotton candy pop fic without needing them to be quality works of literature. But that one, just no.

However, the worse books I've ever read are the Divergent series, hands down. They aren't even worth the paper for kindling. 

Edited by PeachyDoodle
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Harry Potter I could at least finish, but definitely didn't and still don't get the hype! 

I can remember being in my teens/early 20's and reading Catcher in the Rye multiple times to try and "get".  I so wanted it to be life changing.  It was not, and I couldn't even understand why it was to others.  I really wanted too.  

I finally gave up once again on Boy's Life.  😕

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20 hours ago, Selkie said:

Harry Potter and all of the Little House books except for Farmer Boy

I LOVED FB. Hated The Long Winter with the heat of 1000 suns—as an adult that is—-as a child I don’t remember hating it.  
 

 

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The Shack-just really didn't get into it.

Concerning Moby Dick and Pride and Prejudice, I think if I had tried to read the books, I wouldn't have enjoyed them. However, listening to them on audio while driving to work made them a better experience. I really don't think I could have slogged through. Same for Count of Monte Cristo and Great Expectations.

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8 hours ago, Seasider too said:

 

I loved the setting and the premise, but most of the characters were stereotypes and I found the ending predictable. No spoilers, but did it take you very long to figure out whodunit?

Lord no. 🙄

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23 minutes ago, PeachyDoodle said:

Outlander.

Also Outlander.

Oh, and Outlander.

Seriously, that book should have been 100% right up my alley. I even tried the show, thinking maybe it would get me over the hump. But geesh, it was awful.

I'm generally not that picky. I appreciate the classics, even if they aren't the most entertaining things I've ever read, and I can enjoy cotton candy pop fic without needing them to be quality works of literature. But that one, just no.

However, the worse books I've ever read are the Divergent series, hands down. They aren't even worth the paper for kindling. 

That's how I felt about Outlander.  I was so disappointed.  While I generally dislike romance novels, I LOVE timetravel and put up with some romance in most of those types of books.  But, I just really disliked the book.

Oh and totally agree about Divergent. - and The Shack.  Two book that aren't worth the paper they're written on.  

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My great reading nemesis is Tolstoy's War and Peace.  Now that I live in a Balkan country and have that going for me, every attempt doesn't last longer than the first 50 pages; it seems to be a total soap opera with shallow characters...

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1 hour ago, Math teacher said:

The Shack-just really didn't get into it.

Concerning Moby Dick and Pride and Prejudice, I think if I had tried to read the books, I wouldn't have enjoyed them. However, listening to them on audio while driving to work made them a better experience. I really don't think I could have slogged through. Same for Count of Monte Cristo and Great Expectations.

The Shack!! Oh my word. Another life changer for different friend. I really, really tried to slog through it but was more :blink: the whole book than anything else and finally gave up. 

Also. I hated Great Expectations and Charles Dickens in general with an unholy passion. I know that might get me expelled from the boards, but there. I said it. (I also think Anne from Green Gables is super annoying- might as well get it all out.) 

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Also, I have decided since i turned 40 to stop reading "life changing books" other people tell me about when they describe them that way. It's just never going to work out and isn't worth the hurt feelings. Siddhartha I think is the last one someone tried to get dh and I to read that they described as "up ended my world". Thanks, but pass. 

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1 hour ago, Math teacher said:

The Shack-just really didn't get into it.

Ugh.  Yuck, yuck, yuck.

Quote

Concerning Moby Dick and Pride and Prejudice, I think if I had tried to read the books, I wouldn't have enjoyed them. However, listening to them on audio while driving to work made them a better experience. I really don't think I could have slogged through. 

Reading Jane Austen is not a slog for me, but Moby-Dick - I think I got through the first pages to a chapter a ton of times and just.could.not.  But then I tried again this year with the William Hootkins narration, and loved it.  Knock me over with a feather.  The book is funny, and Ishmael is full of snark.  For that one, I needed the audio, it seems...

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I can not give an opinion on Outlander, Twilight, or Fifty Shades, as I have apparently wisely stayed faaar away.  Just no.  Not my cuppa, don't have to read it to figure that out.

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19 hours ago, Lori D. said:

Also not at ALL fond of Katherine Paterson's Jacob Have I Loved or Bridge to Terebithia. (Although, her book The Master Puppeteer was a hit here.)

Until now, I thought I might be the only person in the world to dislike Bridge to Terebithia.

Also hated Catcher in the Rye.

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6 minutes ago, kbutton said:

Until now, I thought I might be the only person in the world to dislike Bridge to Terebithia.

Also hated Catcher in the Rye.

I'll join in on the Bridge to Terabithia hate, lol.

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11 hours ago, arctic_bunny said:

Preach it. The reason I absolutely rocked English the year we covered The Stone Angel was because I cared so little about the book I was able to concentrate solely on symbolism and themes.

 

Ah, es, The Stone Angel is actually Margaret Lawrence who is a slightly older CanLit staple than Atwood.  I like ML a lot, but I really struggled with The Stone Angel in high school, I think it's an inappropriate choice for teenagers.  It's just too difficult to identify or empathise in any way with a rather nasty old woman with no ability to see her own motivations who is facing her own mortality, and even her kids are middle aged and difficult to relate to.

I reread it a few years ago and while I still didn't much like the people I found it far more relatable, a sort of tragedy really.  But in terms of ML novels I think The Diviners is a much better choice for teenagers as it's a coming of age story, at least in part.  I am never sure why anyone would choose TSA for high schoolers instead.

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One thing I will say about classic books that I've struggled with is that unlike pop books that are awful, I have found reading with a good, serious book group can make a huge difference.

I read Tom Jones for a book group about five years ago and while I got through it I struggled, it was dense and long but I also disliked all the people in the book.  But the whole story became much more interesting to me in light of the discussion we had.  Similarly with Mansfield Park, while I like a lot of Austen I didn't like that because I really wanted to slap Fanny Price around, but getting more deeply into the book changed my feelings about her and the story generally.  I find I miss a lot of Austen's humour as well reading alone.

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2 hours ago, PrincessMommy said:

That's how I felt about Outlander.  I was so disappointed.  While I generally dislike romance novels, I LOVE timetravel and put up with some romance in most of those types of books.  But, I just really disliked the book.

Oh and totally agree about Divergent. - and The Shack.  Two book that aren't worth the paper they're written on.  

 

I’ll jump on the no-love-for-Outlander bus. I really *wanted* to like it, but found the amount of sexual content way beyond my comfort level - I had to stop reading, I think in the third book. I tried watching the series once it came out on DVD, but IMO, it is downright pornographic. 

I didn’t mention 50 Shades, Twilight and the like because I thought the thread was about actual quality literature that we just didn’t care for. There’s a lot of ink on paper that doesn’t fit that category!

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52 minutes ago, Bluegoat said:

 

Ah, es, The Stone Angel is actually Margaret Lawrence who is a slightly older CanLit staple than Atwood.  I like ML a lot, but I really struggled with The Stone Angel in high school, I think it's an inappropriate choice for teenagers.  It's just too difficult to identify or empathise in any way with a rather nasty old woman with no ability to see her own motivations who is facing her own mortality, and even her kids are middle aged and difficult to relate to.

I reread it a few years ago and while I still didn't much like the people I found it far more relatable, a sort of tragedy really.  But in terms of ML novels I think The Diviners is a much better choice for teenagers as it's a coming of age story, at least in part.  I am never sure why anyone would choose TSA for high schoolers instead.

 

I love both Margaret Atwood and Margaret Lawrence - I think I've read every book they've ever published.

But, I also didn't appreciate The Stone Angel in high school.  I liked it much better when I re-read it in my 40's.  I think it's on the high school lists because it's short.  I also read The Diviners in high school and loved it.  It's a much longer book, with a lot more risque sexual content, exposure to the seedier/grittier side of life,  and some language - another reason it wasn't on my high school list, I think.

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15 hours ago, Bluegoat said:

 

 there seems to have been a period in the 80s/early 90s where they wanted to add a lot of sex to novels, I seem to remember reading that publishers insisted on a few steamy scenes per book.  Though I don't think that explains the bit in It, I think that was supposed to be something else.

My friend's BIL is a successful thriller author.  His publisher wanted him to add s3x . . . . he was quite devious.  He found a source for very . . . . . over the top .  . .  graphic . . . lets just say, the publisher was blushing red when they told him to "never mind".

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1 minute ago, gardenmom5 said:

My friend's BIL is a successful thriller author.  His publisher wanted him to add s3x . . . . he was quite devious.  He found a source for very . . . . . over the top .  . .  graphic . . . lets just say, the publisher was blushing red when they told him to "never mind".

Tell him thank you from me. I really don't appreciate that in  a book.

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OH I THOUGHT OF ONE!  Eat Pray Love has always struck me as such a vapid piece of work, I’m amazed it has such enduring popularity in the last two generations of women (my mom’s and my own).  Like, I must be missing the gene that cares about someone else’s journey of self discovery and acceptance.  Give me pulpy fiction, fantasy, or nonfiction historical works any day.  

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15 hours ago, Tanaqui said:

 

Fifty Shades of Gray, which I think was originally Twilight fanfic or something of the sort.

And seriously, if you want to read kinky dubcon, have fun! But don't pretend that it's healthy when it's not (what's described in the book is not safe, nor sane, and don't get me started on the consent issues) and don't pretend the writing is all that when, again, it's not. You're not reading that book for the literary value anyway, and everybody knows it.

I never had any interest in it, but did read one review . . . 

the reviewer pointed out if you weren't told this girl was an adult, you'd think she was a kid/teen.  the reviewer likened it to kiddie p*rn.

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15 hours ago, KungFuPanda said:

I loved the books. I get the love. I had a very enjoyable summer reading them. I don’t get making them a religion. I swear the early days of Dianetics must have looked  just like this. 

My 13 year old was looking for something to read. I suggested the Harry Potter books because we have them and I thought she'd enjoy them. She not only enjoyed them, but she's obsessed. Everything is about Harry Potter these days. I'm so sorry I suggested them. I may never suggest another book to her as long as I live. I enjoyed the Harry Potter books when I read them, but now I just want Harry and his friends to go away!

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On 12/31/2019 at 6:35 AM, Plum said:

You guys are making me nervous about a LotR year next year. Ds is listening to The Hobbit on his own I I guess that’s a good sign. 


Don't panic! (lol) What you're hearing on this "disliked ___ book" thread is those who disliked LotR -- you're not hearing from those who liked or loved the trilogy, because that would go in the "loved ____ book" thread. (Except me, since it is one of all all-time faves -- see my post up-thread in defense of Tolkien's writing. 😉 )

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23 hours ago, happi duck said:

I love Go Set a Watchman!  ("Sequel" to To Kill a Mockingbird but it's more the first draft of what became TKAM)  My brother is the only person I've met who also loves it.

I loved it too.   It wasn't as good (to me) as Mockingbird,  but I still loved it.

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3 hours ago, Bluegoat said:

 

Ah, es, The Stone Angel is actually Margaret Lawrence who is a slightly older CanLit staple than Atwood.  I like ML a lot, but I really struggled with The Stone Angel in high school, I think it's an inappropriate choice for teenagers.  It's just too difficult to identify or empathise in any way with a rather nasty old woman with no ability to see her own motivations who is facing her own mortality, and even her kids are middle aged and difficult to relate to.

I reread it a few years ago and while I still didn't much like the people I found it far more relatable, a sort of tragedy really.  But in terms of ML novels I think The Diviners is a much better choice for teenagers as it's a coming of age story, at least in part.  I am never sure why anyone would choose TSA for high schoolers instead.

My apologies. I felt like I had the wrong Margaret, but was too lazy to google. I am officially not a fan of either.

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I agree about Outlander.  I read the first two or three and just stopped there.  Really not that good.

Divergent I was doing find until the ending.  What a crap ending that was.  I feel the same way about a lot of Jodi Picoult.  My Sister's Keeper had the worst ending ever.  I hate when authors do something just for the sake of shock value.  Totally ruins the book/series for me.

I read Twilight way back when oldest dd was into it.  I've read worse.

I read two pages of Fifty Shades and just said no.  The writing was awful.  And I read a lot of cheap mass-market romance novels.  Just awful.

I read the Handmaid's Tale when I was in my early 20's and found it very disturbing.  I keep meaning to reread it and see if I get more out of it now that I'm older.

I stopped reading Stephen King years ago after reading pretty much everything he wrote.  I think I reread The Stand once in the past ten years and nothing else of his.

I so still like (some) Dean Koontz.  

Never attempted Moby Dick, had to read Siddhartha in high school and don't remember much about it (so definitely not life-changing).   I love Count of Monte Cristo and The Three Musketeers.  

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Rachel Hollis? 

😄😂🤦🏻‍♀️

Get over it, Quill! Lol! 

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4 hours ago, Bluegoat said:

 

Ah, es, The Stone Angel is actually Margaret Lawrence who is a slightly older CanLit staple than Atwood.  I like ML a lot, but I really struggled with The Stone Angel in high school, I think it's an inappropriate choice for teenagers.  It's just too difficult to identify or empathise in any way with a rather nasty old woman with no ability to see her own motivations who is facing her own mortality, and even her kids are middle aged and difficult to relate to.

I reread it a few years ago and while I still didn't much like the people I found it far more relatable, a sort of tragedy really.  But in terms of ML novels I think The Diviners is a much better choice for teenagers as it's a coming of age story, at least in part.  I am never sure why anyone would choose TSA for high schoolers instead.

 

I loved The Stone Angel (sorry) but I read it as a 45 yr old.

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