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annegables

words you see here but not "in the wild"

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Preferably education-ish words

Dialectic. I have seen it here and maybe in some CAP or Circe stuff, but never anywhere else. I had to look it up. I thought it was more esoteric, like quadrivium. But then I was reading a John Taylor Gatto book (Weapons of Mass Instruction) and he used it regularly. I finally looked it up and wondered where it had been all my life. Oh. It is "just" a conversation with two or more points of view where people are trying to get at the truth through reasoned argument?! Slap a sticker on me and call me a banana. Now I can smugly say that my homeschool centers around dialectic conversation and it just sounds so amazingly intellectual.

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Socratic discussion.  I would have assumed it had something to do with learning philosophy. Turns out it is another way of saying dialectic conversation.

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"Educational Philosophy"- ummm what is that and why should I have one? 

Charlotte Mason

Nature Study (when someone outside of HS asks you what science your kids are on this year and you say "We do Nature Study" watch their faces.) 

CiRCE

Grammar stage, Logic state,Rhetoric. 

Most people IRL have no clue about "rhetoric" beyond thinking "it's a BS speech to try to talk you into something"

Concept, not single words but "grade and ability aren't  determined by age" 

Child-led

Pedagogy - people outside of certain circles have no idea what this word means either

Progymnasmata

"Are you old earth (OE)  or young earth (YE)?" I have only ever heard in context to schooling and not a SINGLE time outside of the homeschool world. I did not know this was a thing. But it's a big thing.  big enough to lead to Homeschool Conference kerfuffle thing. 

Hmmm......i'm sure there are lots more. Lot of names/things I assume are known with in the homeschooling world are known too, but NOPE. I have exactly one friend who knows who Andrew Kern or CiRCE are, as well as CM. But ask about Abeka or BJU DLO and they can talk all day. Because of this place, I assume *everyone* has heard of WTM. Sadly, nope. Not many at all. I'm Evangelical about this forums and have directed a lot of people here. They are stalkers though- not participants so far as they've told me. 

One of the bigger things for me coming here was learning all of the abbreviations. 

 

Edited by Æthelthryth the Texan
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Rigor. Not a word I had to look up, but I only seem to encounter it on the WTM forums. It is not typically used on other homeschooling forums I am part of, nor is it part of any non-homeschooling realm I take part in.

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I feel so much better now about having to look up so many words while perusing these forums.  😅 I mean, I knew my formal education was somewhat lacking - but there are times here that  I feel like I’m having to translate from another language altogether! 

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3 hours ago, annegables said:

Slap a sticker on me and call me a banana. 

Forget all the fancy pants words. I like this 👍

 

I was about to say that this will now be part of our family lexicon, but then I realised that maybe I was contradicting myself 😄

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2 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Every profession has technical language. This language isn’t unique to homeschooling but to education and classical education in particular. 

Exactly, when I studied my teaching degree several years ago I used all that education specific language in every essay 

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2 hours ago, Expat_Mama_Shelli said:

I feel so much better now about having to look up so many words while perusing these forums.  😅 I mean, I knew my formal education was somewhat lacking - but there are times here that  I feel like I’m having to translate from another language altogether! 

I have that problem because just about everyone on this forum is from North America and I am from Australia. I have to translate my comments into another dialect, I am not sure I get it right sometimes as some of the responses I get seem to indicate I have caused offence somehow

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summative vs formative assessment.  I've been using it on the board recently because it is so helpful in differentiating what we do.

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1 hour ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

It seems appropriate to learn new vocabulary on a forum the celebrates learning and education. I hope that is never dumbed down. 

I fully agree. My point in starting this thread was that dialectic seems like a word I should have encountered long before now. It is not exclusive to homeschooling or classical education. It also seems much more intimidating than it really is. Sort of like Socratic dialogue. After reading The Republic, I finally realized what Socratic dialogue really is and was like, got that box checked.

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4 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

Every profession has technical language. This language isn’t unique to homeschooling but to education and classical education in particular. 

Having been in different corners of the education world for a long time, I would say a lot of it is unique to this corner of homeschooling. Yes, to classical education too. But so much of the conversation here is not at all like in the rest of the education world.

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This feels like a lighthearted discussion being dragged into “you should have known what you were getting into” territory. Of course everything has its language. But there are definitely words I don’t run into outside of this board, even when I read about education or talk to homeschoolers in person or on other homeschooling boards.

”Unschooling” vs “child-led” vs everything else. Yikes. These terms are fraught, and treated extremely differently in different parts of the homeschooling community.

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"Meaty". I see that a lot in the homeschooling world, in reference to whether a curriculum has enough depth to challenge the kids.  

 

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It's funny how often ppl here "follow rabbit trails" and then "dive deep."  That's more metaphorical than actual vocabulary, but still not often heard outside of homeschooling.  

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I was nerding out with another homeschooler IRL and we were discussing how if we hear someone say "scope and sequence" it makes us want to talk to them. Boy, anyone with informed opinions on scope and sequence is someone I want to talk to, and I dont even care if we remotely agree or not!

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On 12/22/2019 at 6:02 PM, Jackie said:

This feels like a lighthearted discussion being dragged into “you should have known what you were getting into” territory. Of course everything has its language. But there are definitely words I don’t run into outside of this board, even when I read about education or talk to homeschoolers in person or on other homeschooling boards.

”Unschooling” vs “child-led” vs everything else. Yikes. These terms are fraught, and treated extremely differently in different parts of the homeschooling community.

I dont think I actually know what "child-led" means anymore. It seems like a word (phrase?) that should be straightforward, but isnt. 

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10 hours ago, daijobu said:

It's funny how often ppl here "follow rabbit trails" and then "dive deep."  That's more metaphorical than actual vocabulary, but still not often heard outside of homeschooling.  

Diving deep into a meaty rabbit trail. 😛

 

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8 hours ago, lewelma said:

Child-led vs interest-led has come up on the board just this week. 

Yep. Which is where I realized that people seem to have different working definitions of the two, and there is a fair amount of overlap, like a Venn Diagram. Ohh! If I should make a giant Venn diagram of educational styles....

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On 12/22/2019 at 8:36 AM, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

CiRCE

 

The first time I saw CiRCE mentioned my mind immediately went to, well, Circe, and I wondered if it were a radical feminist pagan classical curriculum. Nah, it's an acronym and more of the usual classical Christian stuff, but I still think that of all the character names that one could use for a classical Christian curriculum, Circe is an odd choice. 

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11 hours ago, MissLemon said:

Diving deep into a meaty rabbit trail. 😛

 

How about a child-led deep dive into a meaty rabbit hole?  To have a rigorous dialectic conversation. 

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A few were either new or used in a new context for me:

scaffolding- of course I immediately understood the meaning, but had not seen it used outside of construction sites before this board!  

spine- same as above.  The meaning is clear, but the context was new.

neurotypical- first saw this term (as well as neurodiverse) on this board.  This may indicate I live under a rock?

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, mellifera33 said:

 

The first time I saw CiRCE mentioned my mind immediately went to, well, Circe, and I wondered if it were a radical feminist pagan classical curriculum. Nah, it's an acronym and more of the usual classical Christian stuff, but I still think that of all the character names that one could use for a classical Christian curriculum, Circe is an odd choice. 

The reason behind the name is funny (I heard it on a close reads podcast episode) and I might get the details wrong. Basically, Andrew Kern was making acronyms out of Greek mythology characters and that is how the name CiRCE was born. It was the name of his "company" before he ever really had one. Then it became a real company and started growing, and now he was stuck with this name, that is effectively an enchantress who turns men into pigs. So Kern joked that Circe turns men into pigs and CiRCE is trying to turn pigs into men.

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