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What do you think of Peloton commercial?

What do you think of the new Peloton commercial?  

79 members have voted

  1. 1. What do think of Peloton commercial?

    • Generally/mostly positively
      22
    • Generally/mostly neutrally
      39
    • Generally/mostly negatively
      14
    • Are you saying I could be *stuck* in Wichita? ~~~ I'm saying you *are* stuck in Wichita.
      4


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27 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

I think some of the ire might be because people see a woman like that and think she doesn’t have to work to stay looking like that.  And sure many don’t, I never had to until about 37ish. But even once the weight is lost, I have to keep working just as hard to keep it off. 

But if I thought she looks like she would be unhealthy if she lost more weight, and I viewed exercise purpose as purely weight loss, then yeah I guess my big concern would be why push that image of women having to gratefully sacrifice their health to make their husband  be happy with them?

I’d like to know her motivation for the work. If she’s doing it for him, which is does kinda seem that way, then I’m not opposed but I think they could do better for women. Maybe show her crossing the finish line at a marathon she wanted to run for a cause or something? Idk. 🤷‍♀️
 

I agree with the marketing comment above. The purpose and angle of the camera were confusing to me. Didn’t make me angry or anything. I just wasn’t expecting it to be a gift to her husband. That was weird. 

Y'all all need to go watch Brittany Runs a Marathon on Prime.  It is amazing. 

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9 minutes ago, plansrme said:

Y'all all need to go watch Brittany Runs a Marathon on Prime.  It is amazing. 

Yes! I just watched this last week. Made me want to run and I hate running!

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1 hour ago, Chris in VA said:

Peloton workouts can be really challenging.  That is why she looked slightly apprehensive.  

So a husband who buys a really great quality piece of equipment for his wife is abusive now? Sheesh. Maybe he wants her to enjoy working out because he loves her so much he wants her around for a while. Doesn't loving someone mean supporting their health? Ugh. I. can't. stand. people twisting good and making it about selfisness and controlling when it isn't about that at.all. 

What? No one said that (unless I missed it). The OP asked what we thought of an advertisement, not about giving exercise equipment as a gift.  

 

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35 minutes ago, Scarlett said:

That is because they didn’t have an actual year to make the commercial.

Oh but they totally could have started the commercial with like a hike where she's not feeling good and says something like "I gotta start working out."  Then interspaced the vlog clips of her working out, with clips of her going on the same hike and making a bit more progress.  And then, just cause it would be funny, a last clip of her running past her husband, laughing, then their stupid "I didn't know how much it would change me" 

47 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

I think some of the ire might be because people see a woman like that and think she doesn’t have to work to stay looking like that

Oh this is totally true.   Several of the stories I saw were about ridiculous is is that a 116 pound woman spent a year working out to become a 112 pound woman🙄

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I keep hearing about it but didn't have time to check it out until just now (OP link).  As ads go, it's no better or worse than most. 

People with time on their hands could do a pretty interesting analysis on why, to some people, this was worth the time and effort to make a stink about it.  Maybe some people need a job, a hobby, or a stocked broom closet for Christmas.  😛

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Also I don't understand the assumption that this is about weight.  Maybe she wanted to build up her stamina to run a marathon or do the iron-man.  Maybe she had some issues with energy.  Maybe she wanted an alternative to going to the gym.

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I’m offended that Peleton took a mid-ranged bike that wasn’t selling, then jacked the price way up, added slick advertising, and got away with it in a luxury market. I don’t think they improved the bike at all! I hate that price no longer has ANYTHING to do with quality. 

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I don't understand the uproar. But I also don't assume the worst about people or things in general. I am going to assume she asked for the peloton, and that she had goals for herself and that she was genuinely pleased with her own efforts and the support of her spouse. 

Is the girl in the gin commercial supposed to be the same girl from the peloton commercial? Is that why we are supposed to assume the husband is a jerk?

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5 minutes ago, DesertBlossom said:

I don't understand the uproar. But I also don't assume the worst about people or things in general. I am going to assume she asked for the peloton, and that she had goals for herself and that she was genuinely pleased with her own efforts and the support of her spouse. 

Is the girl in the gin commercial supposed to be the same girl from the peloton commercial? Is that why we are supposed to assume the husband is a jerk?

I wondered that too about the gin ad.  I don’t get it, I guess. 

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12 minutes ago, SKL said:

Also I don't understand the assumption that this is about weight.  Maybe she wanted to build up her stamina to run a marathon or do the iron-man.  Maybe she had some issues with energy.  Maybe she wanted an alternative to going to the gym.


I completely agree with you except I do understand bc most people in the states do unfortunately associate exercise almost entirely with weight/looks. 

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Okay. I thought the gin ad was funny. And I am no where near a heavy or even moderate drinker and don’t like gin.

Maybe y’all have never taken a gal pal out for a drink so she can vent and relax through a rough time. Fine. Bet you fed her something though. Or maybe it was a frappe or tea.

The gin commercial wasn’t her dealing with the peloton husband - it was her coping with people being harsh about her character portrayal and looks in the peloton commercial.

 

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4 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:

Okay. I thought the gin ad was funny. And I am no where near a heavy or even moderate drinker and don’t like gin.

Maybe y’all have never taken a gal pal out for a drink so she can vent and relax through a rough time. Fine. Bet you fed her something though. Or maybe it was a frappe or tea.

The gin commercial wasn’t her dealing with the peloton husband - it was her coping with people being harsh about her character portrayal and looks in the peloton commercial.

 

Oooooh. Ok I get it now. 

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8 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:


I completely agree with you except I do understand bc most people in the states do unfortunately associate exercise almost entirely with weight/looks. 

I think the fact that they had the woman start and end slim was probably to avoid the offense that it would have caused to have a heavy woman thank her husband for giving her a tool to get skinny.  With the implication being that she was expected to get skinny for him.  [AKA you can't win.]

Even though a lot of non-slim real-life women do want a tool to help slim down, and there is nothing wrong with that ....

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3 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

I think it’s a dumb commercial.  “I didn’t know how much this would change me”

🤔

I didn’t see any change.  Like, the blogging didn’t show how she can now hike farther or how she is in some way actually healthier, and there’s certainly no change in her appearance.  

So it’s dumb.  

 

On a a separate note, one of the dumbest things about all peloton commercials (which are as hard to miss as perfume and car commercials this time of year, they are EVERYWHERE!) is how they are all in front of some giant picture window.   Why do the commercials always show these bikes set up right in front of giant windows?  Do people generally prefer to work out in front of huge windows or something?

I think it’s a way to show the weather and time of day. You can bike in the rain and snow (see the rain and snow out of the window? But you can still bike, because you’re inside! Yay!). You can bike at night (see how dark it is, but there you are in your bright home biking away!  Yay!)

1 hour ago, Murphy101 said:

I think some of the ire might be because people see a woman like that and think she doesn’t have to work to stay looking like that.  And sure many don’t, I never had to until about 37ish. But even once the weight is lost, I have to keep working just as hard to keep it off. 

But if I thought she looks like she would be unhealthy if she lost more weight, and I viewed exercise purpose as purely weight loss, then yeah I guess my big concern would be why push that image of women having to gratefully sacrifice their health to make their husband  be happy with them?

I’d like to know her motivation for the work. If she’s doing it for him, which is does kinda seem that way, then I’m not opposed but I think they could do better for women. Maybe show her crossing the finish line at a marathon she wanted to run for a cause or something? Idk. 🤷‍♀️
 

I agree with the marketing comment above. The purpose and angle of the camera were confusing to me. Didn’t make me angry or anything. I just wasn’t expecting it to be a gift to her husband. That was weird. 

I didn’t see it as it was a gift to her husband.  It seemed like she was just showing him how happy she was with what she’d gotten the year before.  I’m 99% sure that the next time we see the couple, she’ll be presenting him with a key to a car in the driveway with a big red bow on it. 😄

30 minutes ago, SKL said:

Also I don't understand the assumption that this is about weight.  Maybe she wanted to build up her stamina to run a marathon or do the iron-man.  Maybe she had some issues with energy.  Maybe she wanted an alternative to going to the gym.

My first impression was that it was for strength.  I’m thin right now and I seriously need some strength.  I need to start working out for health reasons beyond my size, fer sure.  I’m just being lazy about it.

 

I interpreted her apprehension as being, “I’m sooo out of shape, I hope I can keep up!”

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6 minutes ago, SKL said:

I think the fact that they had the woman start and end slim was probably to avoid the offense that it would have caused to have a heavy woman thank her husband for giving her a tool to get skinny.  With the implication being that she was expected to get skinny for him.  [AKA you can't win.]

Even though a lot of non-slim real-life women do want a tool to help slim down, and there is nothing wrong with that ....


I think they’d have been better off if they’d left the husband out entirely. I can’t remember the last time I saw a commercial of a man deciding to get exercising that they felt the need to incorporate a sexy approving benevolent wife. Sure it’s out there I suppose.

Contrary to pop culture, whether a woman wants or can get healthier or more fit isn’t about the men in her life.

I’d have enjoyed a middle aged couple deciding to buy their own thing for Christmas and the wife happily doing her own thing while the husband is amazed and supportive. 

This commercial is mostly confusing to me more than anything. No hard feelings or inspiration, just sorta blah about it. 

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3 hours ago, happysmileylady said:

I think it’s a dumb commercial.  “I didn’t know how much this would change me”

🤔

I didn’t see any change.  Like, the blogging didn’t show how she can now hike farther or how she is in some way actually healthier, and there’s certainly no change in her appearance.  

So it’s dumb.  

 

On a a separate note, one of the dumbest things about all peloton commercials (which are as hard to miss as perfume and car commercials this time of year, they are EVERYWHERE!) is how they are all in front of some giant picture window.   Why do the commercials always show these bikes set up right in front of giant windows?  Do people generally prefer to work out in front of huge windows or something?

The perfume adds crack me up.  Advertisers must be shaking their heads at the emperor's-new-clothes ridiculousness of the whole concept.  It's a smell and it's subjective.  "Fine  . . . just film more naked people in water.  Make sure they whisper and make sure people have to see the add twenty times before they even realize we're selling a fragrance."  I swear that's the formula.  

Yesterday I gifted my DH with some coffee beans.  I guess I was telling him he needed to wake TF up and get something done around here.

Have you all seen the Peleton add spoof site? I can't find it because of the recent uproar over the new commercial, but basically a guy took all of the photos from the print ads and rewrote them.  He has things like.  "Just built a $4000 stage in my living room to hold my new Peleton!"  

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5 minutes ago, KungFuPanda said:

The perfume adds crack me up.  Advertisers must be shaking their heads at the emperor's-new-clothes ridiculousness of the whole concept.  It's a smell and it's subjective.  "Fine  . . . just film more naked people in water.  Make sure they whisper and make sure people have to see the add twenty times before they even realize we're selling a fragrance."  I swear that's the formula.  

Yesterday I gifted my DH with some coffee beans.  I guess I was telling him he needed to wake TF up and get something done around here.

Have you all seen the Peleton add spoof site? I can't find it because of the recent uproar over the new commercial, but basically a guy took all of the photos from the print ads and rewrote them.  He has things like.  "Just built a $4000 stage in my living room to hold my new Peleton!"  

I couldn't find the exact site either.  Some are in the bored panda thing I linked to above.

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I think the gift aspect was because it's Christmas time.  😛

I don't have a husband.  I bought myself a fitdesk years ago.  I'm sitting on it right now.  (It is not a Peloton, LOL.)  I guess I am proof that a woman can want a fitness item without having a man in her life ... but at Christmas time couples do buy each other things ....

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15 hours ago, Just Kate said:

But it did work. According to the linked People video, Peloton’s stock went up by over 4%!

This is false. The stock fell and most analysts blamed the ad. It’s still down. They lost nearly a billion dollars.

 

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15 hours ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

My answer is other. I was happy with the uproar because we jumped in a bought a bunch of Peleton stock thanks to it.  It's already bounced, so thanks to all the faux outrage Twitter people- Merry Christmas to us, LOL. 

Same. Except I bought stock the week before the ad uproar. 

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My take is that it just didn't work.

I think you could make an ad where the husband gifts the wife with exercise equipment and it's FINE and not at all sexist. After all, women like to exercise. But the way the ad shows doesn't center her experience of loving exercise - it implies it's all for the husband because it centers him - his gift and her making this video throughout the whole thing, as if it's all for him. In that sense, I don't think it works at all. In private, within a relationship, that might actually be sweet. But framing it that way on the screen? I do think that's sexist. Not like, end of the world and I'm boycotting Peloton now sexist, but not a good look.

My biggest issue with it was that she looks like she's abused. Like, that grin she keeps flashing? Holy crap. She looks like she is smiling so she doesn't get the crap beat out of her. It's the "I don't want to disturb anything in case I make a wrong move and get hurt" kind of grin. Obviously she's an actor. It's not real. But if I saw a real woman look like that at her husband all the time, then I'd be like, honey, are you okay, do you need help? I keep thinking how weird it is that they shot it like that. Like, is she just a cruddy actor and that's her "I'm exercising and genuinely happy" look? Because that's not at all how it reads to me. Or is it the (men, I assume?) who mostly directed and staged the ad think that's what happy women look like? And if so, what the heck are they doing to their wives that they think that looks like a normal, happy look? It's just SO STRANGE because there's no way they intended for her to look like she was afraid and grinning through it. That clearly can't have been the intention. Yet... that's totally how it reads to me and to a bunch of other people I've talked to.

Like, look at this woman. Is this a normal, I'm happy look?!?

peloton.JPG

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3 hours ago, plansrme said:

Y'all all need to go watch Brittany Runs a Marathon on Prime.  It is amazing. 

Oh thanks for the reminder, I’ve been wanting to watch this!!!

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43 minutes ago, Farrar said:

My take is that it just didn't work.

I think you could make an ad where the husband gifts the wife with exercise equipment and it's FINE and not at all sexist. After all, women like to exercise. But the way the ad shows doesn't center her experience of loving exercise - it implies it's all for the husband because it centers him - his gift and her making this video throughout the whole thing, as if it's all for him. In that sense, I don't think it works at all. In private, within a relationship, that might actually be sweet. But framing it that way on the screen? I do think that's sexist. Not like, end of the world and I'm boycotting Peloton now sexist, but not a good look.

My biggest issue with it was that she looks like she's abused. Like, that grin she keeps flashing? Holy crap. She looks like she is smiling so she doesn't get the crap beat out of her. It's the "I don't want to disturb anything in case I make a wrong move and get hurt" kind of grin. Obviously she's an actor. It's not real. But if I saw a real woman look like that at her husband all the time, then I'd be like, honey, are you okay, do you need help? I keep thinking how weird it is that they shot it like that. Like, is she just a cruddy actor and that's her "I'm exercising and genuinely happy" look? Because that's not at all how it reads to me. Or is it the (men, I assume?) who mostly directed and staged the ad think that's what happy women look like? And if so, what the heck are they doing to their wives that they think that looks like a normal, happy look? It's just SO STRANGE because there's no way they intended for her to look like she was afraid and grinning through it. That clearly can't have been the intention. Yet... that's totally how it reads to me and to a bunch of other people I've talked to.

Like, look at this woman. Is this a normal, I'm happy look?!?

peloton.JPG

If there were snow like that outside my window I would also be wearing the BWP face. 

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3 hours ago, marbel said:

What? No one said that (unless I missed it). The OP asked what we thought of an advertisement, not about giving exercise equipment as a gift.  

 

I was speaking to the article. But Farrar did. 

Edited by Chris in VA
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54 minutes ago, Farrar said:

My take is that it just didn't work.

I think you could make an ad where the husband gifts the wife with exercise equipment and it's FINE and not at all sexist. After all, women like to exercise. But the way the ad shows doesn't center her experience of loving exercise - it implies it's all for the husband because it centers him - his gift and her making this video throughout the whole thing, as if it's all for him. In that sense, I don't think it works at all. In private, within a relationship, that might actually be sweet. But framing it that way on the screen? I do think that's sexist. Not like, end of the world and I'm boycotting Peloton now sexist, but not a good look.

My biggest issue with it was that she looks like she's abused. Like, that grin she keeps flashing? Holy crap. She looks like she is smiling so she doesn't get the crap beat out of her. It's the "I don't want to disturb anything in case I make a wrong move and get hurt" kind of grin. Obviously she's an actor. It's not real. But if I saw a real woman look like that at her husband all the time, then I'd be like, honey, are you okay, do you need help? I keep thinking how weird it is that they shot it like that. Like, is she just a cruddy actor and that's her "I'm exercising and genuinely happy" look? Because that's not at all how it reads to me. Or is it the (men, I assume?) who mostly directed and staged the ad think that's what happy women look like? And if so, what the heck are they doing to their wives that they think that looks like a normal, happy look? It's just SO STRANGE because there's no way they intended for her to look like she was afraid and grinning through it. That clearly can't have been the intention. Yet... that's totally how it reads to me and to a bunch of other people I've talked to.

Like, look at this woman. Is this a normal, I'm happy look?!?

peloton.JPG


Wait. Women LIKE to exercise? Really? Because I don’t. I hates it. If the results weren’t worth it to me, hell no I would not have gone out in below freezing weather that sure as heck makes me look like that woman at 5am. In fact, one of my friends who goes walking with me and I have often laughed at the look on each other’s faces as we walk into the cold.  And actually, a bit of physical therapy will give a healthy respect for being careful about exercise and nervous about messing things up too.  I am paranoid about injury.

You see all that and what I see is a woman pushing through totally valid second thoughts about her sanity vs fitness goals.  Btdt.

BWP indeed.  I’m totally using that next time I see my friends. 😆

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24 minutes ago, Chris in VA said:

I was speaking to the article. But Farrar did. 

Um, I said the exact opposite? That you could make an ad where a husband gives his wife exercise equipment and have it not be at all sexist, just that this particular ad didn’t do that because of how they framed it as all about him.

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8 minutes ago, Murphy101 said:


Wait. Women LIKE to exercise? Really? Because I don’t. I hates it. If the results weren’t worth it to me, hell no I would not have gone out in below freezing weather that sure as heck makes me look like that woman at 5am. In fact, one of my friends who goes walking with me and I have often laughed at the look on each other’s faces as we walk into the cold.  And actually, a bit of physical therapy will give a healthy respect for being careful about exercise and nervous about messing things up too.  I am paranoid about injury.

You see all that and what I see is a woman pushing through totally valid second thoughts about her sanity vs fitness goals.  Btdt.

BWP indeed.  I’m totally using that next time I see my friends. 😆

Yeah, sorry... there’s a some missing there that I was thinking... I type too fast. I also am not a woman who inherently enjoys exercise, that’s for sure. But everyone is always telling me some people do. 🤷‍♀️

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It's a weird little ad, that's for sure. At least the wife isn't half naked in it (hello perfume ad I had to sit through yesterday).

It's awfully glossy - idk, American ads always look like that to me.

It's just a weird little story, also. Women gets bike (fine), woman is scared to start riding (um), woman rides all year, still looks the same (yeah, ok), then she makes a video of the 'journey' ? (peculiar). And the bloke is sort of there, but also not ? But he's the audience ? Idk. I think whoever came up with it just couldn't tell a story. I didn't know the brand before, now I do, I don't have a good impression of the brand, probably wasn't the target demo anyway.

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I do think one issue a lot of people had with the ad is that the woman is very slim. There’s no noticeable difference in her “after” from her “before” and she exercised for *a year*. 

Now, IMO, that is 100% because of their target market: affluent, health-conscious young people. The bikes themselves are quite expensive and you can only use the tech features if you have good internet (which would be a no for me); this also hints at a preference for people under, say 40, or maybe 35. I doubt many people in my age bracket find it thrilling to be in a virtual “class” with folks all over the world *while* they exercise. I personally would never consider that a perk. 

Before they released this tone-deaf commercial, I already thought their ads were a turn-off to me personally, because they would show a young, slim woman on there, biking hard until she’s literally dripping sweat. They actually zoom in on the sweat dripping off her face. This is a hard no for me. I hate to sweat! I know it’s healthy and all that jazz but if I have to exercise until I’m wringing wet with sweat every day, I just will not do it. I would have to go through my dang hair procedure all over again every day and so it would not happen! 

In general, I find nothing terrible about an exercise bike as a gift from a spouse, assuming the woman wants it or would probably be thrilled. My husband bought me an exercise bike one year, but I wanted one and we picked it out. I think it’s her beaten-puppy vibe that ruins this ad. It doesn’t seem like this is for her; it seems like it’s some need to win the approval of her onerous mate. 

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2 hours ago, Farrar said:

This is false. The stock fell and most analysts blamed the ad. It’s still down. They lost nearly a billion dollars.

 

It's only a loss if you sell. They bounced back after the ad drop. It dropped today because of the Citron Report, but they're still up $12 on the year. Most analysts are still rating it a buy. 

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2 hours ago, Farrar said:

My take is that it just didn't work.

I think you could make an ad where the husband gifts the wife with exercise equipment and it's FINE and not at all sexist. After all, women like to exercise. But the way the ad shows doesn't center her experience of loving exercise - it implies it's all for the husband because it centers him - his gift and her making this video throughout the whole thing, as if it's all for him. In that sense, I don't think it works at all. In private, within a relationship, that might actually be sweet. But framing it that way on the screen? I do think that's sexist. Not like, end of the world and I'm boycotting Peloton now sexist, but not a good look.

My biggest issue with it was that she looks like she's abused. Like, that grin she keeps flashing? Holy crap. She looks like she is smiling so she doesn't get the crap beat out of her. It's the "I don't want to disturb anything in case I make a wrong move and get hurt" kind of grin. Obviously she's an actor. It's not real. But if I saw a real woman look like that at her husband all the time, then I'd be like, honey, are you okay, do you need help? I keep thinking how weird it is that they shot it like that. Like, is she just a cruddy actor and that's her "I'm exercising and genuinely happy" look? Because that's not at all how it reads to me. Or is it the (men, I assume?) who mostly directed and staged the ad think that's what happy women look like? And if so, what the heck are they doing to their wives that they think that looks like a normal, happy look? It's just SO STRANGE because there's no way they intended for her to look like she was afraid and grinning through it. That clearly can't have been the intention. Yet... that's totally how it reads to me and to a bunch of other people I've talked to.

Like, look at this woman. Is this a normal, I'm happy look?!?

peloton.JPG

I didn't get that impression at all.  People all look different.  First impressions of total strangers on screens are pretty unreliable, and therefore most people adjust for that when they watch a commercial.

The reaction on this post shows that your reaction was not the typical one for people who have not been pre-warned to look for something sinister.

Seems to me that one or two influencers influenced a bunch of people and that got the ball rolling.  I doubt they all would have had that reaction had they not heard anyone else's reaction first.

I don't really care - I think overpriced exercise equipment is a frivolous purchase and really don't care about preserving Peloton stock prices.  But honestly I think people are easily swayed ... and that can be problematic in general.

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As far as people liking to exercise or wanting to like it ... yes I know women who like it.  Yes I know women (and have sometimes been one) who want to like it because it would help them meet some goals.  And yes I know women who get motivation from being in a virtual "class."  It doesn't sound far-fetched to me.  I assume the marketing department did the leg work on that before they mass marketed this product.

I do hate to sweat, but I don't mind it so much if I am alone in my house and can take a shower after.

And again - it doesn't need to have anything to do with the user's waistline or weight.  I ran a 5K last month and came in behind a number of women who were overweight.  They were fitter than I (or my slim but lazy daughter for that matter).  Maybe they worked out regularly.

As far as the making a video, they needed to find some way to show the feature and try to make it look valuable in some way.  Who else would you share that kind of thing with ... your mother in law?  LOL I can't imagine wanting to use that feature at all, but maybe some people would.  There are people who are constantly making dumb little videos and I don't get that either.

Edited by SKL

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37 minutes ago, SKL said:

As far as people liking to exercise or wanting to like it ... yes I know women who like it. 

 

I love working out.  It gives me a sense of accomplishment that I don't get from anything else and it helps with my anxiety.  I'm always thrilled to receive fitness items as gifts.  

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38 minutes ago, SKL said:

As far as the making a video, they needed to find some way to show the feature and try to make it look valuable in some way.  Who else would you share that kind of thing with ... your mother in law?  LOL I can't imagine wanting to use that feature at all, but maybe some people would.  There are people who are constantly making dumb little videos and I don't get that either.

I'm confused about the bolded. What feature are you referring to? 

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3 hours ago, Farrar said:

My take is that it just didn't work.

I think you could make an ad where the husband gifts the wife with exercise equipment and it's FINE and not at all sexist. After all, women like to exercise. But the way the ad shows doesn't center her experience of loving exercise - it implies it's all for the husband because it centers him - his gift and her making this video throughout the whole thing, as if it's all for him. In that sense, I don't think it works at all. In private, within a relationship, that might actually be sweet. But framing it that way on the screen? I do think that's sexist. Not like, end of the world and I'm boycotting Peloton now sexist, but not a good look.

My biggest issue with it was that she looks like she's abused. Like, that grin she keeps flashing? Holy crap. She looks like she is smiling so she doesn't get the crap beat out of her. It's the "I don't want to disturb anything in case I make a wrong move and get hurt" kind of grin. Obviously she's an actor. It's not real. But if I saw a real woman look like that at her husband all the time, then I'd be like, honey, are you okay, do you need help? I keep thinking how weird it is that they shot it like that. Like, is she just a cruddy actor and that's her "I'm exercising and genuinely happy" look? Because that's not at all how it reads to me. Or is it the (men, I assume?) who mostly directed and staged the ad think that's what happy women look like? And if so, what the heck are they doing to their wives that they think that looks like a normal, happy look? It's just SO STRANGE because there's no way they intended for her to look like she was afraid and grinning through it. That clearly can't have been the intention. Yet... that's totally how it reads to me and to a bunch of other people I've talked to.

Like, look at this woman. Is this a normal, I'm happy look?!?

peloton.JPG

Oh jeez, that’s probably my face every time I walk into the Y. I have worked really hard at getting into shape this year and every new step has come with a lot of trepidation. In that way, I found the commercial relatable. That you connected it to fear of her husband is surprising to me and I can’t say that it makes sense unless one is looking to draw those kinds of lines. 
 

 

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Why do we have to think anything about the commercial?  Or the actor for that matter?  It's designed to sell a product to a certain demographic.  It either gets you interested in the product or it doesn't.  The actor herself happens to have wide deepset eyes and eyebrows that combine to make her look anxious in general but really, the ad isn't there to make some big overarching statement about society or life etc. even though that seems to be the narrative that people try to give it in social media comments etc. 

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2 hours ago, Quill said:

I do think one issue a lot of people had with the ad is that the woman is very slim. There’s no noticeable difference in her “after” from her “before” and she exercised for *a year*. 

Now, IMO, that is 100% because of their target market: affluent, health-conscious young people. The bikes themselves are quite expensive and you can only use the tech features if you have good internet (which would be a no for me); this also hints at a preference for people under, say 40, or maybe 35. I doubt many people in my age bracket find it thrilling to be in a virtual “class” with folks all over the world *while* they exercise. I personally would never consider that a perk. 

Before they released this tone-deaf commercial, I already thought their ads were a turn-off to me personally, because they would show a young, slim woman on there, biking hard until she’s literally dripping sweat. They actually zoom in on the sweat dripping off her face. This is a hard no for me. I hate to sweat! I know it’s healthy and all that jazz but if I have to exercise until I’m wringing wet with sweat every day, I just will not do it. I would have to go through my dang hair procedure all over again every day and so it would not happen! 

In general, I find nothing terrible about an exercise bike as a gift from a spouse, assuming the woman wants it or would probably be thrilled. My husband bought me an exercise bike one year, but I wanted one and we picked it out. I think it’s her beaten-puppy vibe that ruins this ad. It doesn’t seem like this is for her; it seems like it’s some need to win the approval of her onerous mate. 

 

It's that plus the sheer boredom of a woman cycling for a year and then...making a video about it for her hub. I mean, it would have been more inspiring if she started off on the exercise bike and then by the end of the year she was doing an Iron Woman competition or something. I still don't understand why she was nervous about the bike in the first place, also. Like, did she think she was gonna break it or something ?

I would be happy if someone gave me an exercise bike, but I'll be damned if I'd make a whole 'journey' video about it for them. 

Agree with you on the sweat. I do not need to see zoomed in sweat pictures. Gross.

Edited by StellaM
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I just watched the gin ad - I'm thick or something - what is going on in that ad ? What is happening that people like it ? Why is it better than the Peleton ad ? 

At least in the Peleton ad I understood what was happening, even if what was happening was lame.  Why do they say 'you're safe here' ? Why are they snide about her drinking the gin, but then they give her more gin ?

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I don't know that it's exactly sexist.  It's poorly written, though.  "I didn't know how this would change me".  Ok, so how exactly did it change you? Physically? Mentally? Spiritually? The commercial doesn't really demonstrate how it changes her.  She doesn't look any different.  They don't show improved biking times or distances in the ad.  She doesn't sound more confident at the end of this "journey".  So...? Where's the beef, lol?

 

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I looked up the lyrics for the song that plays during the commercial, and I feel like it just makes it even weirder.  "She's So High", by Tal Bachman. The lyrics are about this perfect woman who's out of reach.  Bleh.

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I wasn't aware of it until I saw this thread. 

I watched it and shrugged.  What exactly is the uproar about?  If a woman wants an exercise bike and her husband gets it for her for Christmas it's a good thing.  If she isn't interested in exercise and he gets her one it's a bad thing.  Based on the context of the commercial she seems to have been into exercise and she's happy.  Great! 

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5 hours ago, Farrar said:

 

Like, look at this woman. Is this a normal, I'm happy look?!?

peloton.JPG

For me this looks like "I feel stupid videotaping myself  and I have overly expressive eyebrows but I kinda want to document my journey anyway." 

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1 hour ago, MissLemon said:

I don't know that it's exactly sexist.  It's poorly written, though.  "I didn't know how this would change me".  Ok, so how exactly did it change you? Physically? Mentally? Spiritually? The commercial doesn't really demonstrate how it changes her.  She doesn't look any different.  They don't show improved biking times or distances in the ad.  She doesn't sound more confident at the end of this "journey".  So...? Where's the beef, lol?

 

Right?!?!?  Exactly.  There's NO change demonstrated in the commercial!  That's what makes it dumb and confusing to me.  

And I think the backlash, unfortunately is all about people thinking there's supposed to be a change in her weight, which is why all that stupid 116lb to 112lb crap started.  Which, to me carries this undercurrent of body shaming, like if a woman is smaller, she's not supposed to want to work out anyway so the only reason her spouse gifted her this thing has to of course be that he's a chauvinistic ogre who thinks his wife should have some unrealistically low weight so he can show her off.

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Those of us who have been through a transformation that started with a new healthy physical habit can understand "I didn't know how this would change me."

And yes, a good exercise habit can change a person in physical, mental, social, and spiritual ways.  Even if she started out slim in the first place.

If she did stick to a good habit for a year, think about how that contrasts with most of us, who tell ourselves on January 1 "I'm going to exercise more bla bla bla" and we're over it 10 days in.

(Still - it's just a commercial, meant to sell people something expensive that nobody needs.  But it isn't any worse than any other commercial.)

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14 hours ago, Farrar said:

Um, I said the exact opposite? That you could make an ad where a husband gives his wife exercise equipment and have it not be at all sexist, just that this particular ad didn’t do that because of how they framed it as all about him.

Ah, I must have misunderstood. You said she looked abused by her husband, so I thought you meant buying a bike was part of that abuse. Comments of people quoted in the article implied it was abusive to do so. 

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On 12/10/2019 at 12:19 PM, fairfarmhand said:

Me neither. The gal seems fine with her gift. 

But then my dh buys me cows for gifts so I understand unconventional gifts. 

Funny thing is that is a pretty valuable gift 😆

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I don’t understand how an actress playing an imaginary woman can “look abused by her husband” or not look “normal” or “happy.” People analyzing it like it’s authentic footage is what confuses me. Sometimes there are just bad commercials. It doesn’t mean imaginary lady needs an imaginary intervention. I think imaginary lady just created an imaginary fitness habit. That’s HARD for some (real) people and WOULD be life changing even if your size remained the same. 

People LOVE to pile on. They just do. 

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4 minutes ago, KungFuPanda said:

I don’t understand how an actress playing an imaginary woman can “look abused by her husband” or not look “normal” or “happy.” People analyzing it like it’s authentic footage is what confuses me. Sometimes there are just bad commercials. It doesn’t mean imaginary lady needs an imaginary intervention. I think imaginary lady just created an imaginary fitness habit. That’s HARD for some (real) people and WOULD be life changing even if your size remained the same. 

People LOVE to pile on. They just do. 

Yep, she's an actress. I think it is a weird commercial and no, doesn't make me want a Peloton (can't think of anything that would).

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