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mmasc

What do you use to drain tuna?

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Question says it all. I like DRY tuna, so squeezing with the can lid won’t work for me. In the past I’ve used a fine mesh sifter/colander thing, but the forceful pressing caused it to break. Surely there’s something better. 🤔 I could buy another one, but I feel certain I’ll break it again soon. 

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Well, you can put it in a colander (more like a pasta colander that's heavy-duty) and let it drain out and gently pat with a paper towel.  Or you can squeeze with the lid, and then pour onto a paper towel lined plate and pat with another paper towel on top?

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8 minutes ago, J-rap said:

Well, you can put it in a colander (more like a pasta colander that's heavy-duty) and let it drain out and gently pat with a paper towel.  Or you can squeeze with the lid, and then pour onto a paper towel lined plate and pat with another paper towel on top?

I have tried the sturdier strainer but it tends to have bigger holes and I lose some tuna! I haven’t done the paper towel thing. I could try that. 

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I was going to suggest a rice washing bowl, but I think it would be better to try the pouch or the paper towel method first.  If you press out the moisture through a sieve with small enough holes, you're likely to end up with tuna stuck in the holes!  

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If you don't want to lose tuna and want it as dry as possible, put the squeezed-out-in-the-can tuna onto a kitchen towel and twist and squeeze any remaining liquid out. 

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I used to use the can, but it’s not enough to get rid of the fishy taste in water packed tuna.  So now I put it in a wire strainer and rinse it with cold running water.  Then I press it with the back of a spoon, and then fluff it up and then do it again.  I don’t have to press hard enough to break the strainer to get it dry if I do this a couple of times.

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1 hour ago, bibiche said:

If you don't want to lose tuna and want it as dry as possible, put the squeezed-out-in-the-can tuna onto a kitchen towel and twist and squeeze any remaining liquid out. 

I can see this working. Does the smell come out of the towel? Or do you just use the same towel every time for tuna only?

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9 minutes ago, mmasc said:

I can see this working. Does the smell come out of the towel? Or do you just use the same towel every time for tuna only?

I rinse out kitchen towels used for this purpose immediately and then wash them as usual. No residual odors. 

If you don't want to faff around with towels you could use a china cap, which is sturdier than a mesh strainer, but china caps are expensive and a towel will actually get the tuna drier, and is ultimately less messy.

Edited by bibiche
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I use my hands and just smush the water out. (But I'd love a tuna draining gadget, as long as it didn't hold stink. I hate tuna stink.)

Edited by alisoncooks
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6 hours ago, Jean in Newcastle said:

I got this little tuna strainer thing from the grocery store tuna aisle.  It's fairly thick plastic and hasn't broken on me.  And it doesn't cost much. 

Same here.  It's blue.  It works great.  And it came with a ring that attaches around the outside, to use with larger diameter cans (I haven't tried this).

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I just use the can but I squeeze it really hard and I can't imagine how it could get any drier.

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I usually press tuna through a Tupperware colander. Yes, real Tupperware. 🙂 It doesn't break.

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Don’t eat tuna.  I thought I was being cautious by only eating fish once per week since some recommendations say eat it no more than twice per week.  Nope, I got mercury toxicity anyway.

Think it won’t happen to you? It happens to a lot of people who just never figure out that is what happened. My education, experience, persistence and extreme analytical personality intersected to figure out things few other people figure out.

Wild salmon has very low mercury content. If you buy it in packets it doesn’t have skin and bones and is naturally on the dry side. Shrimp has undetectable mercury.

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