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MercyA

Mistranslations on kids' pajamas

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I really, really hope this is not interpreted as me being mocking or mean. I feel compassion for workers at companies which can't afford (or don't want to pay for) good English translations on their products. While I was looking for pj's for my daughter, I found some interesting English-y words and phrases on some of them. 

I give you:

Rabbit pj's which inexplicably say, "Love the rain of cats" or possibly "Love the rainos cat." Kind of cute. Could be a unique gift! 

Rabbit pj's which say "YIFH F*&@#" 😮and "With a smile and shower, don't forget to clean your ear. Morning smile." Possibly a good reminder for someone? 🙂 

Cat pj's which say "CARTOON" and "Create your unique, warm, and stylish romantic home." Clearly a cut-and-paste job.

Duck pj's which say "NAUGHTY." No, just no.

I actually like these and am going to ask my daughter if she wants them: cat pj's that say, "Sea thet." A reviewer thought perhaps they meant "sea treat" or "sea food?" Anyway, they're really cute. 🐱

Edited by MercyA
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I kind of want to make those rabbit PJ's our "family PJ's" for Christmas, but I don't think i could afford the therapy bill.  

Just kidding, of course, those are seriously bad translations.  

 

ETA: So, I just looked up YIFH on Urban Dictionary.  Some things don't belong on children's pajamas.  Suffice it to say, that I'd never have written the above if I'd googled first. 

Edited by CuriousMomof3
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12 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

I kind of want to make those rabbit PJ's our "family PJ's" for Christmas, but I don't think i could afford the therapy bill.  

Just kidding, of course, those are seriously bad translations.  

ETA: So, I just looked up YIFH on Urban Dictionary.  Some things don't belong on children's pajamas.  Suffice it to say, that I'd never have written the above if I'd googled first. 

Oh my goodness. I didn't know it meant anything in particular. :blush: You could always go for the "rain of cats" rabbit pj's instead!

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2 minutes ago, MercyA said:

Oh my goodness. I didn't know it meant anything in particular. :blush: You could always go for the "rain of cats" rabbit pj's instead!

 

Except now I'm worried what I'll find when I google PAB and BRL.  Hopefully those are just the names of the bunny's ears.

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I wish I could find the photo I took.  My son had a set of plush ninja turtles with a tag that started with "WARNLING" and just got progressively funnier from there.  I don't think it's rude to poke fun at a COMPANY for this sort of thing.  Their safety warnlings should be in clear English.  That's part of doing business in a foreign market.  Yeah, warnling is a word at my house now.  

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29 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

Except now I'm worried what I'll find when I google PAB and BRL.  Hopefully those are just the names of the bunny's ears.


So, I couldn't resist.  I am now convinced that any combination of 3 letters will lead to something unsavory if you type it into urban dictionary. 

 

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Yikes!  On *kids* pajamas?  Those acronyms are pretty bad even for an adult who knows (maybe a hen party gag?) but for kids ....  (head shaking emoticon should be here) 

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Translations are the fount of humor and levity.

Consider these gems:

At a restaurant in the Middle East: The water in this establishment is safe. It has personally been passed by the manager.

An unfortunate, literal translation from German if I remember correctly: Nothing sucks like Electrolux (a vacuum cleaner)

At an upscale hotel - forgot what country:  Ladies are asked not to have children in the lounge.

 

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1 hour ago, Liz CA said:

Translations are the fount of humor and levity.

Consider these gems:

At a restaurant in the Middle East: The water in this establishment is safe. It has personally been passed by the manager.

An unfortunate, literal translation from German if I remember correctly: Nothing sucks like Electrolux (a vacuum cleaner)

At an upscale hotel - forgot what country:  Ladies are asked not to have children in the lounge.

 

The Electrolux is actually correct British English of the day https://gabriellaferenczi.com/2017/05/20/nothing-sucks-like-electrolux/

I remember that slogan.

Edited by Laura Corin
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My son came back to the states (from China) with very similar shirts, PJs, sweats, and jackets.  🤣

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My brother buys what he calls “silly  English phrase” clothes for my kids.

he lives in turkey and they’re always funny. I’ll post a pic when my dd gets up.

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22 hours ago, Laura Corin said:

The Electrolux is actually correct British English of the day https://gabriellaferenczi.com/2017/05/20/nothing-sucks-like-electrolux/

I remember that slogan.

 

Evidently it was considered ambiguous at best or even plain unskilled due to the other meaning of "suck" in various English speaking parts of the world.  🙂

 

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25 minutes ago, Liz CA said:

 

Evidently it was considered ambiguous at best or even plain unskilled due to the other meaning of "suck" in various English speaking parts of the world.  🙂

 

No, that's the point. At the time in Britain, we were largely unused to other meanings of 'suck'. We might have heard the usage in American films, but it wasn't part of British vocabulary. Thus it was a perfectly good slogan for Britain at that time.

According to the article I linked, the slogan was not used in the US, so Electrolux did nothing wrong: it was only in the Internet age that it was picked up as funny. Wikipedia lists it as an urban legend that this was a blunder https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brand_blunder

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We have a gymnastics mat that says "in the sue of this mat."  We joke that they planned on getting sued. (We actually like the mat, and bought a second one a few years later, it said "in the use of this mat," version 1 is much funnier.

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4 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

No, that's the point. At the time in Britain, we were largely unused to other meanings of 'suck'. We might have heard the usage in American films, but it wasn't part of British vocabulary. Thus it was a perfectly good slogan for Britain at that time.

According to the article I linked, the slogan was not used in the US, so Electrolux did nothing wrong: it was only in the Internet age that it was picked up as funny. Wikipedia lists it as an urban legend that this was a blunder https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brand_blunder

I think I remember that add from when I was younger 

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On 12/2/2019 at 4:56 AM, CuriousMomof3 said:

I kind of want to make those rabbit PJ's our "family PJ's" for Christmas, but I don't think i could afford the therapy bill.  

Just kidding, of course, those are seriously bad translations.  

 

ETA: So, I just looked up YIFH on Urban Dictionary.  Some things don't belong on children's pajamas.  Suffice it to say, that I'd never have written the above if I'd googled first. 

I get Young Israel of Forest Hills 😁

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Many years ago I worked for a Japanese translation company.  Sometimes we would have clients who were dead set on using a particular English word or phrase as, basically, decoration, regardless of meaning.  It made for some VERY frustrating conversations.

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9 hours ago, JennyD said:

Many years ago I worked for a Japanese translation company.  Sometimes we would have clients who were dead set on using a particular English word or phrase as, basically, decoration, regardless of meaning.  It made for some VERY frustrating conversations.

 

I have heard of this back in the late nineties - especially with Asian countries where some executives evidently thought it was cool to put any English word on clothing regardless of meaning.

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