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Ktgrok

what would a minimalist homeschool look like?

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On 12/6/2019 at 2:56 PM, birchbark said:

Liberally outsource in high school.

 

 

I'd like to hear more about what you mean here, if you're up for it. How does this relate to minimalism (or prioritizing, if you like) in the homeschool? We aren't there yet but almost and I think about it all the time. It seems like there are a lot more things to balance in high school, especially time commitments. Things probably also drastically change  when the kids can arrange activities for themselves, and drive themselves everywhere. All my friend's kids have delayed getting their drivers license, though. I don't know if that's a local quirk or what but from the outside it does seem to make things unnecessarily difficult for the homeschooling mothers. 

Edited by Quercus
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35 minutes ago, Quercus said:

 

  1. Acknowledge (or create) constraints
  2. Determine goals
  3. Let everything else go
  4. Trust that it will be fine

I need to sit with these. I don't seem to be doing any of them right now. Thanks for putting them in writing.

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8 hours ago, lewelma said:

Well, I think you are asking super fun questions.  Keep it up!

Thank you for this encouragement. I dont want to come across as the opinionated interloper.

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Friday we bought new cube storage for the kids' room and moved some toys into there and then yesterday I worked on organizing all the homeschool paper/records/etc. I have a million different binders and it is ridiculous so I'm moving to a filing system for completed work, and already have a file going for upcoming work that isn't just open and go. Trying to simplify all the various moving parts. 

Also still trying to figure out better art supply organization. 

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In researching Hake Writing and Grammar, I came across this old thread from these boards, which gives a succinct example of one way to have a very minimalist homeschool that is still traditional in approach: 

 

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3 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Friday we bought new cube storage for the kids' room and moved some toys into there and then yesterday I worked on organizing all the homeschool paper/records/etc. I have a million different binders and it is ridiculous so I'm moving to a filing system for completed work, and already have a file going for upcoming work that isn't just open and go. Trying to simplify all the various moving parts. 

Also still trying to figure out better art supply organization. 

I can't help you too much on the minimalist thing, but I can say that having a dedicated area for art supplies has been nice. The boys use their art satchels, and I (who have a lot more stuff) have a shelf for things like light boxes and books, and keep the paints, art pads, watercolor pads, and other things in rolling suitcases. Makes it easy to put away and load up for art in town every Thursday.

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Thank you to everyone talking in this thread.  Despite having a crazy busy week, I got several nagging physical organizing projects done related to homeschool.  I've also spent a lot of evenings re-thinking philosophical minimalism relating to homeschooling, and I decided to re-listen to Julie Bogart's Brave Learning (wonderful book, by the way).  

I'm not sure I am a philosophical minimalist when it comes to homeschooling, after digesting this all for a week.  But I do think I am leaning more and more towards rejecting many elements of the current "mainstream" homeschool culture.  Minimizing for me may mean saying no to all the voices in my head talking about this or that new "resource" and latest/greatest curriculum.  I am relying more and more on personal investment in my own education than reliance on another person's resource, and that has led, in many ways, to a feeling of greater simplicity and deeper learning.  I'm standing more firmly in my belief (encouraged by Julie Bogart and others) that a big, juicy conversation (BJC, let's see if my acronym catches on around here 😃) is more likely to generate authentic learning than any other form of schooling.  Creating opportunities for these BJC to exist means, yes, exposing my kids to history, literature, and science, but it is OK if my objectives for a lesson are set aside in favor of a more interesting BJC.  This mental flexibility is new to me, as I'm a complete control freak.  But I can SEE and FEEL that this is right when I'm interacting with my kids.  

So many bunny trails on this topic I'm ready to hop down!  So excited to relaunch our language arts after Christmas with a radical departure from what we've done up until now.    

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52 minutes ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

I'm not sure I am a philosophical minimalist when it comes to homeschooling, after digesting this all for a week.  But I do think I am leaning more and more towards rejecting many elements of the current "mainstream" homeschool culture.  Minimizing for me may mean saying no to all the voices in my head talking about this or that new "resource" and latest/greatest curriculum.  I am relying more and more on personal investment in my own education than reliance on another person's resource, and that has led, in many ways, to a feeling of greater simplicity and deeper learning.  I'm standing more firmly in my belief (encouraged by Julie Bogart and others) that a big, juicy conversation (BJC, let's see if my acronym catches on around here 😃) is more likely to generate authentic learning than any other form of schooling.  Creating opportunities for these BJC to exist means, yes, exposing my kids to history, literature, and science, but it is OK if my objectives for a lesson are set aside in favor of a more interesting BJC.  This mental flexibility is new to me, as I'm a complete control freak.  But I can SEE and FEEL that this is right when I'm interacting with my kids.  

I completely agree. Discussion is key. 

There are of course many ways to embrace minimalist homeschooling, but for me it is about two things: deep thinking and engagement. These 2 goals drive every choice I make.  Engagement makes a kid keen to learn, so I pick topics that ds is interested in and I pick a way for him to learn that matches his learning style.  Deep thinking requires embracing complexity and removing silo-ing. It also requires open ended questions the encourage higher levels of thinking. 

Many types of learning approaches can encourage deep thinking and engagement.  So for me, give me a textbook that is just above my level and give me time to wrestle with difficult content, and I will be both engaged and thinking deeply -- making connections and evaluating, synthesizing, and interpreting.  But this would be a fail for my younger son.  Deep thinking and engagement for him require holistic tasks that require him to bring all content together into a complex multi-page answer. For example, for redox in chemistry, he will be writing a research paper on how batteries actually work and comparing different kinds, whereas I would study a textbook. Another example, for geography he has written a large scale research paper on comparing the development economics of Botswana to the DRC, and I have studied multiple textbooks that I cross reference and compare the ideas with a more theoretical context. 

So for me the goals of deep thinking and engagement can be met in many ways.  But you must *design* the learning tasks to meet these goals.  Most curriculum just don't. 

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I just started reading this thread today.  It is very interesting.  I have been homeschooling for about 13 years and have collected lots of stuff. It took awhile to zero in on things that I liked.  There is much I would like to shed, but my issue isn’t so much that I keep it in case I need it, but more who do I give it to.  I hate dumping homeschool stuff at the library book sale because we have just about 0 homeschool families except one other friend and I hate trying to sell it online because it is a hassle.  I have one lady that I gave my AAR to because my youngest was done with it, but she has 8 kids with 9 on the way and two dogs and I don’t want to inflict more stuff on her.  Any ideas?

Also, how do you approach a move to minimalism when the kids (and husband) aren’t particularly interested in that as a goal?  My mother has pestered my father for years to get rid of stuff (he grew up during the depression) while she has, for example, enough dishes to sink a ship and continues to buy my children way more than they need or that I can store.  I really don’t want my family to remember me as being just like her, but I am to the point that I can’t take the clutter any longer.

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Conversations are where learning happens here, as well! And yet...I keep focusing on texts. And I keep worrying about proving "to them" they have done work, although that is unlikely to ever be an issue. I'd love to read books from the library on historical topics and discuss them, and am not sure what is holding me back from that. 

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26 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

Conversations are where learning happens here, as well! And yet...I keep focusing on texts. And I keep worrying about proving "to them" they have done work, although that is unlikely to ever be an issue. 

I don't understand.  Proving to who?  Your kids? The government?  

When my kids were young I actually kept a diary each week sorted by subject and simply filled in the correct box for what we had accomplished in that week in each subject. ALL things counted, from field trips to discussions to movies to books to crafts to PE to home Ec to violin.  ALL of it. When you write it all down, it is absolutely amazing what you have accomplished during the week.

As my kids got older, I organized the learning at the *end* of the year into courses we had completed.  Planning is essential, but plans are useless.  I always planned out my courses, but I never followed my plans, which is why I wrote up the courses at the end.  I could then show the kids or the government or the universities what had actually gotten done. Rabbit trails could lead to entirely new courses as I dropped my plans in a related field. If your kids are learning every day in a deep and meaningful way, I just don't see how you can go wrong. 

Edited by lewelma
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53 minutes ago, Mom2mthj said:

Also, how do you approach a move to minimalism when the kids (and husband) aren’t particularly interested in that as a goal?  My mother has pestered my father for years to get rid of stuff (he grew up during the depression) while she has, for example, enough dishes to sink a ship and continues to buy my children way more than they need or that I can store.  I really don’t want my family to remember me as being just like her, but I am to the point that I can’t take the clutter any longer.

I am a minimalist, my kiddos and hubby aren't, although they enjoy our tidy home that is easy to find things in.  Most professionals suggest starting with your own things and the communal things.  Seeing the positives (in the look of the house and your attitude) may encourage them to let go as well.  For younger kids offering to buy a single item or event if they "sell" their unwanted stuff to you may be the ticket to clutter freedom.  It has taken a while of me not nagging and making room for hubby's stuff while reducing the rest of the house, but he has started going through his things and reducing.  It had to be on his terms though.

As for how to get rid of your homeschool items.  There used to be a web site that gave materials to families in need, but I don't remember if they still exist or not.  Is it stuff that could be used in a classroom?  If so, offer it to local teachers.

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1 hour ago, lewelma said:

I don't understand.  Proving to who?  Your kids? The government?  

When my kids were young I actually kept a diary each week sorted by subject and simply filled in the correct box for what we had accomplished in that week in each subject. ALL things counted, from field trips to discussions to movies to books to crafts to PE to home Ec to violin.  ALL of it. When you write it all down, it is absolutely amazing what you have accomplished during the week.

As my kids got older, I organized the learning at the *end* of the year into courses we had completed.  Planning is essential, but plans are useless.  I always planned out my courses, but I never followed my plans, which is why I wrote up the courses at the end.  I could then show the kids or the government or the universities what had actually gotten done. Rabbit trails could lead to entirely new courses as I dropped my plans in a related field. If your kids are learning every day in a deep and meaningful way, I just don't see how you can go wrong. 

I don't even know, lol!

I mean, regulations say I need to keep a portfolio of work showing progress, but they are not sticklers about how much has to be shown. and if they went back to public school in some crisis it would be good to have I guess..

But in reality I have a dyslexic daughter and likely dysgraphic son so output is not an easy thing here. I worry I'm ruining their interest in things by requiring output. 

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Our "oxygen mask" level homeschooling is very stripped down. Do free reading, do Khan Academy, write a page about something. That's my bare minimum when life hits major chaos. It's a contrast with our typical daily schedule where my middle school students have 8 or 9 subjects every day.

Some of my kids thrive with those minimum requirements and spend the rest of their time following their own interests, gaining an in-depth education in the process. Others will finish that small amount of work after much complaining, and immediately switch on a YouTube video of someone else playing a game. (Particularly if I am at the hospital with another kid and dad is running the house by himself.) They need a lot more outside structure and motivation.

We do streamline a lot, even when we are doing every subject at full speed. Parent driven projects? Nope. Combining seven different textbooks for a single subject? Not these days. (I did when we had a fraction of the kids!) Daily lessons require zero prep. I am willing to go down rabbit trails when they come up. Most kids only have one notebook they are working in at a time, and they do all their work in it. Loose papers get photographed or scanned if we need to keep them, immediately recycled if not. 

Edited by beaners
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16 hours ago, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

 I am relying more and more on personal investment in my own education than reliance on another person's resource, and that has led, in many ways, to a feeling of greater simplicity and deeper learning.

 

This is an interesting observation. When I feel like I am not up to par in a subject, I tend to buy a lot of things. At first I did not think much of it. But I came to realize that I was buying those things not to compensate for what I lacked, but so that I could learn it, and therefore turn a lack into a strength.  If not a strength at least a competency. After I realized that, I still bought all the things. But then I USED them, learned what I needed to learn, and then got rid of all of it. I didn't need to hold onto it for the kids for some hypothetical later date. I can just talk to them about it in real time. 

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I am coming at this topic from the end of home schooling. My daughter is 11th grade and dual enrolled. Most of her high school classes this year are at the college with the exception of ACT/SAT prep, bible and literature (1/2 credit courses), and Algebra II with a private tutor. We do still have a home school are and materials at home, but i am working on clearing out. Next year, all her classes will be at the college as she will be doing a full load of classes. I have so many books to move out!

If I were starting over with younger kids, I would be more unschoolish in their younger years. I would teach phonics and some basic math skills, but i would let everything else be interest led until at least age 10 or so. 

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1 hour ago, threewishes said:

but i would let everything else be interest led until at least age 10 or so. 

 

What would you ideally like to do between age 10 and ~? high school? When dual enrollment begins? Whatever amount of time in between early childhood and nearly-adult. 

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2 hours ago, Quercus said:

 

What would you ideally like to do between age 10 and ~? high school? When dual enrollment begins? Whatever amount of time in between early childhood and nearly-adult. 

I didn't start home schooling until 6th grade. For the middle school years, we had specific class that were still somewhat interest led. For example, in history for 6th grade, we focused on topics she enjoyed rather than time periods. History was as much hands-on as she wanted it to be. She is a visual learner, so videos and even computer games like Minecraft were a part of her curriculum. We did not use one source as a spine. We used lots of sources. I also did not worry about time. She didn't do an hour of history a day. We might do 2 hours on one day and none the rest of the week. Or we might to 20 minutes one day, 30 the nest and an hour the next. We were not required to keep track of hours, so we didn't. What I did focus on in middle school was building the skills she would need for higher level learning. We worked on writing, geography/history skills like map reading and timelines, science labs and math. She also started taking college level tests in 7th grade. She took the ACT in 7th and 8th grade and the PSAT in 9th grade. Now, my daughter happens to be a good test taker who does not have test anxiety, so this route might not work for everyone. High school has been more structured but still somewhat interest led. Her electives have definitely been her choice. Last year she took a life skills class with a co-op, a financial literacy class, and and art history class at home. For English, I have required certain things such as some Shakespeare and poetry, but the other short stories and novel have been her choices. Math is the only old one out because I am not skilled in it, and she does have a certain aptitude for mathematical concepts. I hired a tutor that she has been working with for over a year now. Math is not her best subject, but with the tutor, her ACT score in math improved 4 points this summer. 

Dual enrollment is not for every student, but my daughter has thrived in her college classes. This year and next, most of her high school classes will be at the college. She should graduate with an AA degree at the same time as she graduates from high school. In Florida, dual enrollment classes are free, so this is saving us a lot of money too. 

I would say that the best thing I did as a home schooling mom was to trust my daughter and let her choose areas of study even as a high school student. 

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On 12/7/2019 at 7:17 AM, Quercus said:

 

I'd like to hear more about what you mean here, if you're up for it. How does this relate to minimalism (or prioritizing, if you like) in the homeschool? We aren't there yet but almost and I think about it all the time. It seems like there are a lot more things to balance in high school, especially time commitments. Things probably also drastically change  when the kids can arrange activities for themselves, and drive themselves everywhere. All my friend's kids have delayed getting their drivers license, though. I don't know if that's a local quirk or what but from the outside it does seem to make things unnecessarily difficult for the homeschooling mothers. 

 

Yes, you're right, there is more going on in high school. When you outsource, there is much less for you, the mom, to worry about. You can focus on what you need to focus on without worrying that other balls are being dropped. Maybe that's a particular subject or an extracurricular you want to do together, or maybe you just need to focus on your relationship (which is a lot bigger deal in high school). For me, I also had younger children I was schooling.

Motivation, or the lack of it, can be a big factor in high school as well (I think more with boys). The fewer subjects you are responsible for, the fewer battles being fought-- in that scenario. 

We live rurally, so the best option for us was online classes. You're also right about getting the driver's license promptly. It opened up a lot of opportunities for us. So it's good to budget for both of these!

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On 12/8/2019 at 8:27 AM, Ktgrok said:

Friday we bought new cube storage for the kids' room and moved some toys into there and then yesterday I worked on organizing all the homeschool paper/records/etc. I have a million different binders and it is ridiculous so I'm moving to a filing system for completed work, and already have a file going for upcoming work that isn't just open and go. Trying to simplify all the various moving parts. 

Also still trying to figure out better art supply organization. 

I love cube storage. All of my daughter's homeschooling stuff currently sits in an IKEA Kallax, and I adore that thing. 

Now to think about the original question, lol! 

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For my accelerated 7 year old, a minimalist homeschool means focusing on the 3R's and music and letting everything else be interest-led. Right now, it means we do math, writing and piano every weekday (and piano in fact every day), and we've started doing a spoken foreign language most days, but most other things are optional. I don't assign reading and I don't assign output on the books she reads. She gets lots of play time and lots of input into her schedule. 

We've wound up a lot less unscheduled this year than I expected, because given the choice, my daughter wants to do lots of things as opposed to just a few... she's less of a homebody than I am. She says her favorite thing about her homeschooling are the classes at the local homeschooling center, which means we're there 4 out of 5 days a week. However, again, this was something she decided she wanted. 

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On 12/11/2019 at 8:44 AM, birchbark said:

When you outsource, there is much less for you, the mom, to worry about.

Well, I am going to have to disagree about outsourcing. I have found that outsourcing has led to much more stress and busyness in our homeschool, and has been the opposite of minimalism. Outsourcing means assessment, and assessment means being *prepared* on a certain day to be *judged* on your *performance.* Those three words -- prepared, judged, and performance -- are key.  I have always done a few outside courses to help motivate my kids to study for test, but in general when you are being judged on your performance, you are no longer learning for the sake of learning.  You are typically not also in LOVE with your life and your studies.  You feel judged, and feel pressure to perform for the person judging you. 

Now you would think that without tests and required output to drive a kid forward that not much would really be learned. But I have found the opposite. Having relaxed homemade courses without assessments and grades has meant that my kids could learn what they wanted to learn, at their own speed, to the depth that interested them, and then move on to the next thing. I can give them As for excellent learning without them having to *prepare* for a test. Preparation takes time and often results in lower-level learning on the blooms taxonomy chart. You have to memorize rather than working on interpretation, evaluation, and synthesis. Homemade classes for us have been *way* less stressful than outsources classes and have resulted in equally effective learning. Very definitely minimalism for us. 

maybe you just need to focus on your relationship (which is a lot bigger deal in high school).

I did want to acknowledge this. Clearly, if this is your situation, it negates what I said above. 🙂 

 

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We have a significant age gap (gaps, really) in our family that has shaped how we homeschool. The oldest two girls were homeschooled from 2nd/4th grade through 6th/8th grade. Both chose to attend PS for high school. I was very intense & schooly with them. Looking back, it was a stressful time in our lives and the way I homeschooled added to the pressure; we were involved in multiple outside groups, I faithfully did many mom-directed subjects daily, they studied musical instruments and performed regularly on top of participating in a club sport many days weekly. Oh, and I had a preschooler and a pregnancy/newborn/toddler along for the ride.

The younger two girls are 4 & 4.5 years apart from the next oldest child. They’ve never attended outside school. We did participate in a coop, but when it no longer served us, I dropped it without regret. We eliminated all the fluff to free up more time for playing and interest-led learning. Both have a huge, time-consuming outside passion (ballet for one, horse riding for the other); both study the core subjects intensively and well; and both have plenty of rest, downtime, and fun. It’s like two different families really. 

We are a large family living in a smallish historic home. Our bedrooms are small/shared, closets are tiny, and I have no tolerance for clutter. My homeschooling style has evolved to a much more minimalist approach which works best for everyone. We travel more, cook/eat at home more, keep fewer ‘things’ and have more meaningful experiences. I wish I could go back to my younger self and tell her to streamline, relax, and narrow her focus, but I think the journey to reach here was formative. I was learning possibly more than my kids along the way...

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So, at the end of two weeks of our new more streamlined approach, this is what we are doing. 

At breakfast I read a short chapter from Minn of the Mississippi, which has plenty of interesting science as well as being good literature. The chapters are short enough that I'm usually done when they finish eating. 

Then they get ready for the day and each child has a "daily work" binder with 5 dividers for the days of the week. On Sunday I put their "individual" work in there.

For my 1st grade boy that means:

-two phonics pages from this set https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Digraphs-Worksheets-Phonics-Workbook-2270082

-one handwriting page from this set (we already did the first book in the series and I have all of them) https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Lowercase-Intervention-or-Homework-Practice-HWT-Style-Font-1696921

-3-4 pages I print from Mathematical Reasoning - I got the PDF so I could print the ones I want him to do, and skip the stuff he's already solid on. He's loving it. 

-a page I created/printed that has a cute photo of a dog reading a book that says "Read Something" which is his reminder to do independent reading. 

 

For  the 4th grade girl (the one with dyslexia)

-one lesson from Math Lessons for a Living Education

-one lesson from Language Lessons for a Living Education

-Either two pages from Abecedarian or a two page spread from Super Speller (alternating)

-Then the cute homemade pages with photos to remind her to:

        -read something

       -do one handwriting page from Cursive Success

      -do a typing lesson from Touch, Type, Read, and Spell which reinforces phonics as well as teaches typing

      -practice her spelling cards (visual flashcards for most common words - we do about 5 a week- where there are pictures in the words and she likes to redraw them. Not a full spelling solution, but because she is so artistic it hits a sweet spot with her and gives her confidence in her every day assignments to at least be able to spell the most commonly used words and I do these with her, breaking them down into their sounds, etc as appropriate for dyslexic education)

 

Then for our group work we are currently doing an advent unit study. The younger one was fighting it as he didn't want to write his answers on the reflection pages, but didn't want to just skip them when his sister was doing them. So yesterday I took the time to find an alternate page for him that went with the same theme as her reflection page - in fact I found a coloring page and a page with a maze on it and let him choose. That made him happy to have his own work, and everyone did well. 

We are also doing a Holidays Around the World unit, and then we are doing a Space Science unit from the good and the beautiful. But now I'm not trying to hit all three of those in the same day. Or at least, not push too much. So yesterday we did the craft from the Holidays study for Mexico, but that was it from that. And Space was a short lesson that we did outside. 

I subscribed them to more educational youtube channels and they chose on their own to watch some videos on bees and bee keeping, how candy canes are made, and others. they've been watching Crash Course Astronomy as well in the evenings. I am refraining from printing note booking pages about crash course Astronomy, lol. 

And I have art assignments from Art with a Purpose I was forcing them to do, and I realized that forcing art is not what I want for them. So I subscribed them to the Art Hub for Kids youtube channel and last night when they were looking for something to do with DH I put on one on drawing Rudolph and they had fun doing that. 

I've cleared my shelves of all the stuff I am not using RIGHT NOW. Stuff I may use is in a bin in the living room on shelving, out of sight. Stuff for another year is in two medium plastic bins in the closet in our room. Not having it out, taunting me, is a huge mental relief. I heard or saw some one talking about the silent to do list - the idea that your stuff is always talking to you, and it really hit home. So those flashcards left over from CLE that we are not using but I want to keep were just screaming "maybe you should do more fact drill, are you sure you don't want to use me?" every time I walked by. Etc etc. 

We are also going to try to do more out of the house stuff that I've been skipping in order to try to get all the academic stuff done. Because in the big picture my goal is not kids that made it through all the lessons of our history curriculum, my goal is happy, well rounded kids who love life. 

That is the perspective I've been missing - the long term view. When I try to think what my goals are for this year, I get bogged down in minutia. If I think about my overall, long term goals it is easier to see that not all of it has to happen this year, this week, this day. Yes, I want her to have an overview of history by middle school, but we have time. Yes, I want her to be able to write well by the time she graduates, but that doesn't mean she has to be writing a certain amount this week. Obvious, and yet not. 

Edited by Ktgrok
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