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My DD wants human anatomy and I want to add labs for credit to make it a full science credit. The class (coursera/ open university/don't judge)  doesn't seem to expect at home labs and I couldn't replicate university labs anyway, so I will be assembling some things. I know that the requirement for labs is 30 hours.That seems like a lot if it means seat time, but I think I can manage 3 labs a month for 10 months. Or maybe I could do 15hours for a half credit?

Does anyone have a list of suggested labs for  a high school course? I think it could get really expensive so I want to make sure I have realistic expectations before getting into it. 

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if you go to Home Science Tools they have individual specimens along with dissection guides that are pretty reasonable. My ds is studying A&P this year.  As he learns the various body systems, I have found a dissection speciman to go along with it.  For example after he studies the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, he will dissect a sheep's heart and lungs. He is also doing several microscope labs with tissue slides. 

https://www.homesciencetools.com/biology/dissection/

https://www.homesciencetools.com/biology/human-anatomy-physiology/

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3 hours ago, regentrude said:

Virtual labs?

 

 

Who claims that??? 

I was going by the HSLDA. Virtual labs would be ok for some, but I'd like her to do some hands on things as well. Dissections aren't my thing- I opted out of them myself in high school because of issues with where they may be getting the animals, so virtual labs for that would be ideal. 

30hrs sounds like a lot to me too, but if you divide it over a year it may be fair. I saw some homeschool people promoting a 2 day intensive for "all the labs" you'd need to turn your science into lab science. That sounds a little crazy too. 

What do you think is realistic? 

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1 hour ago, aaplank said:

if you go to Home Science Tools they have individual specimens along with dissection guides that are pretty reasonable. My ds is studying A&P this year.  As he learns the various body systems, I have found a dissection speciman to go along with it.  For example after he studies the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, he will dissect a sheep's heart and lungs. He is also doing several microscope labs with tissue slides. 

https://www.homesciencetools.com/biology/dissection/

https://www.homesciencetools.com/biology/human-anatomy-physiology/

Those are some I was looking at. How many will you do? 

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7 hours ago, Paige said:

I was going by the HSLDA. ...

What do you think is realistic? 

And what does the HSLDA base their claim on? They are not the transcript police.

I did not go by quantity but by quality and did  labs to achieve the educational goal I had with them, irrespective of time. None of the colleges my kids applied to wanted to know how long the labs took.

The students in my college class spend 12 hours in lab per semester, and that counts as the lab portion of the course with integrated lab. The class that is 24 hours of labs is even a separate lab course.

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7 minutes ago, regentrude said:

And what does the HSLDA base their claim on? They are not the transcript police.

I did not go by quantity but by quality and did  labs to achieve the educational goal I had with them, irrespective of time. None of the colleges my kids applied to wanted to know how long the labs took.

The students in my college class spend 12 hours in lab per semester, and that counts as the lab portion of the course with integrated lab. The class that is 24 hours of labs is even a separate lab course.

I don't know. I saw how some states' public schools were using that number too (150hrs for regular course/180 for course with labs) so they may have pulled it from that.

When I saw 30hrs I was surprised because I don't think I spent 30hrs in lab with my anatomy and physiology class in college and we had a lot of labs. It was a 1 semester course, very intense, and lots of time in lecture. 30 hrs would have been about 6 labs a month, or more than once a week. Considering it was a 2 day a week class, there's no way it had that much hands on lab work. 

 

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I don't understand how a public school's schedule would allow for more instruction time in such an increment for a lab science course, so that seems weird to me. Typically all courses are given the same amount of time in class (unless they're two periods, in which case, they'd be a lot more hours than that) because they have to have everything be interchangeable for changing classes. How would a public school science course get that extra 30 class hours? None of the high schools were I taught had a provision for something like that. I guess it could be more homework time... but we're talking about labs. That implies there's less instructional time overall and more homework and more labs. I guess that could work... but I don't believe for a minute it's actually happening like that.

I'm with Regentrude. HSLDA is not the transcript police. Apparently they not only fear monger about legislation, but they also scare homeschoolers into thinking they need more lab hours than nearly anyone is actually getting.

Edited by Farrar
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Way back in the dark ages when I was in high school, science classes had labs once a week in addition to the regular class time.  That one day both the regular class time and the period right before or after it was used for labs.  Usually it was a study hall, gym or lunch that was replaced with the extra period.  We had 50 minute class periods with 10 minutes switch time in between.   We had to eat lunch in that 10 minutes if we were missing lunch for lab.

My daughter had similar when she was in high school.    So 1 to 2 hours a week for a 40 week school year.

ETA:  When I was in college, I had labs once a week for 2 1/2 to 3 hours in addition to the normal class lecture time.  It was part of what made it so hard to do science as a part-time student.  

Edited by Where's Toto?
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19 hours ago, Paige said:

Those are some I was looking at. How many will you do? 

He's doing the cow's eye, sheep's brain, sheep's pluck (heart & lungs), 12 tissue slides, and a blood typing kit, for his lab portion.  He did 30 hours of lab for an advanced biology course last year, and got burnt out.  His labs are much more manageable this year, and with several books, videos, Crash Course, and a good A&P coloring book, he's loving science this year.

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I have taught A&P for high schoolers in a co-op setting. We did three dissections (cow’s eye, sheep’s heart and fetal pig). I took the class to see a live cardiac surgery (a nearby hospital has a viewing dome for the public).

The majority of the rest of  the “labs” were looking at slides. I used all virtual slides from the computer. You can find the database of slides from many major med school online. My personal opinion was that they got as much out of looking at and identifying things from an online photo of an excellent specimen and good preparation of a slide than from using a microscope themselves, other than the microscope skills themselves.  If I was teaching it at home I’d probably do the slides on our own with a microscope as well for the experience but we didn’t really have microscopes available to us as a class. I think Homeschool Science sells a set of slides that go along with the Apologia A&P class. 

The books we used (Apologia...chosen by the co-op but I think it’s an ok book) also had three other labs. One was to take a chicken bone and put it in vinegar. All the calcium carbonate will get dissolved and you end up with just the collagen. Another was to do a simple nerve two-point discrimination test when studying the nervous system. And the last one was one looking at a bicarbonate buffer system when we studied the kidney. I can’t remember exactly what they did (they did all of those at home) but you could probably google for ideas if you want to do that one. Blood typing would also be a reasonable lab. 

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21 hours ago, Alice said:

I have taught A&P for high schoolers in a co-op setting. We did three dissections (cow’s eye, sheep’s heart and fetal pig). I took the class to see a live cardiac surgery (a nearby hospital has a viewing dome for the public).

The majority of the rest of  the “labs” were looking at slides. I used all virtual slides from the computer. You can find the database of slides from many major med school online. My personal opinion was that they got as much out of looking at and identifying things from an online photo of an excellent specimen and good preparation of a slide than from using a microscope themselves, other than the microscope skills themselves.  If I was teaching it at home I’d probably do the slides on our own with a microscope as well for the experience but we didn’t really have microscopes available to us as a class. I think Homeschool Science sells a set of slides that go along with the Apologia A&P class. 

The books we used (Apologia...chosen by the co-op but I think it’s an ok book) also had three other labs. One was to take a chicken bone and put it in vinegar. All the calcium carbonate will get dissolved and you end up with just the collagen. Another was to do a simple nerve two-point discrimination test when studying the nervous system. And the last one was one looking at a bicarbonate buffer system when we studied the kidney. I can’t remember exactly what they did (they did all of those at home) but you could probably google for ideas if you want to do that one. Blood typing would also be a reasonable lab. 

My daughter used the apologia anatomy and physiology book at home to and did these labs. I will say that it was helpful to gain the microscope skills for when she took A&P in college. 

I don’t know if our labs added up to 30 hours, but college lab time isn’t always “lab” either. I’d do a good amount and not worry about time that strictly. Really, for a lab science, it’s pretty easy to go over 180 hours combined time for the year if it’s a meaty course. 

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The only college I've heard of specifically requiring weekly, hands-on science labs from all students is Arizona State University.  If that school is not the goal, you may be fine with a combination of virtual and hands-on labs.

Edited by klmama
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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm late to the party but I have been on this site a lot lately so I knew the teacher had some stuff listed for Anatomy and Physiology

@Paige

https://www.biologycorner.com/anatomy/

This is a high school course.  It looks like she has two course projects posted as well as cat dissection.  Plus her course outline, etc.

If you look at the biology pages she has sheep's brain dissection and fetal pig dissection.

ETA: Sheep's brain was in a different spot. https://www.biologycorner.com/anatomy/sheepbrain/sheep_dissection.html

 

Sheep's heart dissection is here: https://www.biologycorner.com/worksheets/heart_dissection.html

 

Edited by cintinative
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