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My daughter needs to translate the following phrases and then turn them from the active voice to the passive voice in English and Latin. The homework is from a recorded class, so I don't have the answer sheet. Please help!

Translate: Senes id genus ludi non dilexerant

Active translation

Latin transformation:

Passive translation

 

Translate: Multi viri fortes haec Maria navigaverunt

Active translation:

Latin transformation:

Passive translation:

 

Translate: Auctor bonus multos libros legerit

Active translation:

Latin transformation:

Passive translation:

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I think you might have better luck if you post your daughter's answers and ask for feedback on them.  Or point to the specific issue she's having.  Or if she's so stuck that she has no idea even where to begin or what questions to ask, that might be something for her to email the teacher about.

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we've tried contacting the teacher multiple times and they've never responded. My daughter also doesn't really know where to begin. She's translated them as best she can into english, then rewrites the sentence from active voice (english) to passive voice (english). She just doesn't know how to convert Latin active voice to Latin passive voice. It's always been a struggle for her. I'd like to help, but I don't know how since I don't know latin and since i don't have the answers.

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Ok, it sounds like she understands active and passive voice in English, then?  Active voice is where the subject does the verb, and passive voice is where the verb is done to the subject.  It's the same way in Latin. 

So look at the changes she made in the English sentence.  Say you have "The boy rode the horse".  To change from active to passive, you switch the subject and direct object, and you change the verb from active to passive: "The horse was ridden by the boy."  You're going to make those same changes in Latin.  Just like in English, you're going to switch the subject and direct object, but where in English you switch the word order, in Latin you change the endings (there can also be a word order switch, but it's the endings that are key).  Switch the subject ending to a direct object ending and vice versa (watching out for differences in declension and number).  And just like in English, you're going to change the verb from active to passive, but unlike English it's strictly a matter of changing endings (again, watching out for changes in number, if the subject is singular and the direct object is plural, or vice versa).

If she hasn't already, I strongly suggest that she parses every word in each Latin sentence.  It's a lot easier to see what needs to be changed and what stays the same that way.  Parsing is where you state all the attributes of each word.  Nouns and adjectives have declension, gender, case, and number; verbs have conjugation, person, number, tense, mood, and voice.  With changing from active to passive, all that's going to change wrt nouns and adjectives is case; all that's going to change wrt verbs is voice and maybe number (if the subject is singular and the direct object is plural, or vice versa).  Once she's parsed the active sentence, and then written the parsings for the transformed sentence, then it's just a matter of adding the endings that correspond with the new parsings.

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I'm not much help but I can tell you that my son (ds14) really struggled with the active to passive translation. So I just wanted to offer my sympathies.  😃

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