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The New “Calvert”?

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9 hours ago, knitgrl said:

I don't think I would ever describe homeschooling as convenient, except the part where we can sleep in and not have to have kids on the bus by 7:30am. 😆


😄 Convenience is actually a big part of our decision.  Dh works 4 on/3 off each week and usually those 4 days include the weekend.  We shift school to fit his schedule so we have more time as a family.  It's a lot less convenient to have a kid in school 5x a week and nobody having days off together so you can't do any family stuff.

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3 hours ago, HomeAgain said:


😄 Convenience is actually a big part of our decision.  Dh works 4 on/3 off each week and usually those 4 days include the weekend.  We shift school to fit his schedule so we have more time as a family.  It's a lot less convenient to have a kid in school 5x a week and nobody having days off together so you can't do any family stuff.

We’re 4/3 also. We do school throughout the scorching hot summer and take time off when the weather cools down. My teen kids require a lot more sleeping in these days or I get too much drama. We can take time off when company comes over or when a game releases the whole family has been looking forward to. Or plan visits to family out of state around museum exhibits. 😊

Edited by Plum
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2 hours ago, HomeAgain said:


😄 Convenience is actually a big part of our decision.  Dh works 4 on/3 off each week and usually those 4 days include the weekend.  We shift school to fit his schedule so we have more time as a family.  It's a lot less convenient to have a kid in school 5x a week and nobody having days off together so you can't do any family stuff.

I would not call that convenience, I would say that family is your priority. Our reasons for homeschooling have shifted. We started out for primarily academic reasons. Now, it's more for being together as a family. My husband and I both went to ps, as did our oldest child and I know it can be the best choice in different situations, but having homeschooled for five years now, it just seems so weird to send your kids to somebody else for 8 hours a day as default.

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On 11/18/2019 at 9:17 PM, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

In all fairness to the bolded- some people (like me!) start out that way, but quickly find their footing to shift to the positive and start becoming goal oriented instead of just reactive. But when you are leaving school, in general it is because you are dealing with a less than optimal, if not a crisis situation, vs. people who decide from the time before they give birth that they are homeschooling, where you have loads of time to think through things and develop high and lofty ideals. I've gotten to enjoy both sides in a way. We pulled our oldest out of school mid-junior high because nothing the school did made sense and I had just hit frustration max. I read Dumbing Us Down, and had waded into some general homeschooling type things, but had in no way wrapped my head around anything resembling a philosophy. But once we started i knew it was what I wanted to do with the younger ones who weren't anywhere near school age.

I still don't know if I have a philosophy almost 6 years later, but I definitely see it as something I want to do, not something I have to do. Most days. Although I'd never in a million years call it convenient!

 

You know, I'm realizing I wasn't super clear (both in my post and in my own head!) about the idea of positive and negative motivations. I actually don't think pulling your kid out of school and never having expected to homeschool automatically puts you in the negative category. My daughter went to kindergarten and I pulled her out after that year. And the reason that I pulled her out was actually because I had a positive vision for education: I knew what I wanted from her education (for her to be challenged, for the work to be on her level, for her to read interesting books, for her mathematical talents to be recognized), and literally none of that was happening. So we pulled her up because actual school wasn't living up to an already formed vision of an education. And we had taught her to read and to do math and to play piano ever since she was a preschooler, so we did have experience working with her. But we had absolutely never expected to homeschool her (even though we now love it and can't imagined doing anything different for a good long while.) 

On the other hand, some of the homeschoolers I know who've always dreamed of homeschooling had never sent their kids to any kind of childcare and in fact, seem to be homeschooling due to extremely exaggerated fears about what happens in school. So it almost seems like they've spent more time thinking about what they don't want out of an education than what they do want! So they know they don't want Common Core, and they don't want short recesses, and they don't want large classes, but they haven't spent a ton of time thinking about what they do want. Or they expect something magically good to happen because they are avoiding the monster that is school... 

Am I making sense here? I really wasn't trying to suggest that pulling your kid out after some school meant you only had (or even started out with) a negative vision. That'd be hypocritical of me! 

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On 11/19/2019 at 2:08 PM, square_25 said:

And I've literally heard someone give the reason of "I don't like getting up in the morning" as their reason for homeschooling. 

We are zoned for the best high school (public OR private based on the national exam marks) in the Country. This school is 6 blocks from our house.  My older ds offered to teach an olympiad maths class to their best students after school. When this school realized that ds was zoned, they asked him to attend. DS's response (haha): "I don't like waking up early." This very rules-based, strict, conservative high-school offered to have him officially skip the first two periods every day and arrive at 11am because they were desperate for his marks and IMO qualifications.  We found this *very* funny!

Edited by lewelma
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On 11/19/2019 at 9:33 AM, Meriwether said:

I remember when it used to be a lot busier here. One thing I noticed was that traffic slowed about the time I saw threads chastising people for asking questions that had already been discussed. Posters were strongly encouraged to read old posts instead of asking themselves. There are a number of issues I see with that. It discouraged discourse. The search function here is terrible. It implied that discussion on a number of topics was finished. As helpful as the pinned threads are, I think they also decrease the amount of discussion.

I love re-reading old threads, but it is NOT the same as the back and forth of current conversation. I would *love* to rehash ideas that can be found in old threads because with new voices and old voices with new experiences, we will come up with new directions for old topics. 

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On 11/19/2019 at 5:31 AM, Evanthe said:

At the first college, the admissions advisor found out that we homeschool and the first thing she said was, "what online program or co-op do you use"

There are only a few other homeschoolers at MIT, but ds has said that all of them that he has met either attending B&M highschool or went full time to CC. DS thinks he might be the only homeschooler who actually did homegrown coursework with his MOTHER. haha

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7 hours ago, lewelma said:

I love re-reading old threads, but it is NOT the same as the back and forth of current conversation. I would *love* to rehash ideas that can be found in old threads because with new voices and old voices with new experiences, we will come up with new directions for old topics. 

Yes! Active discussion, the back and forth of ideas, is what makes the forum intellectually stimulating.

Personally I think it could be interesting up revive some of the good discussion threads from the past and continue them. The bias against zombie threads shouldn't apply to those with deep discussion that are worth bringing back.

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6 hours ago, lewelma said:

There are only a few other homeschoolers at MIT, but ds has said that all of them that he has met either attending B&M highschool or went full time to CC. DS thinks he might be the only homeschooler who actually did homegrown coursework with his MOTHER. haha

It's entirely possible we'll go the route of a flexible B&M high school for social reasons. I am pretty sure we would provide an academically superior experience if we homeschooled, but I'm worried about DD getting lonely. This year, 3 of her friends are moving!! Homeschoolers seem a lot less tethered to the place they live, for obvious reasons. At least around here :-(. 

We'll see what she wants, of course. Right now, she loves being homeschooled, and it's possible I'll be able to cobble together a social group that doesn't leave ("I'll teach your kid math and you STAY PUT." :P) But I understand how that happens... 

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Sometimes I feel like I am so outside anyone's box that it is hard to communicate. My own educational background is so unusual--my early years were basically unschooling in an enriched environment with a music emphasis, 3rd-12th grades involved attending eight different schools in five different countries with three different primary languages of instruction. And I was what this board would call 2e--probably high IQ but with ADHD and dyslexia. Huge swaths of my time in school were spent in a sort of haze, either because my brain was overwhelmed and couldn't focus or because I was in that language immersion stage where things aren't making very much sense yet. Most of the academic stuff I learned I learned on my own, through reading.

Education as an adult-directed, consistent, straight path sort of thing is not my starting point.

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4 hours ago, maize said:

Most of the academic stuff I learned I learned on my own, through reading.

Education as an adult-directed, consistent, straight path sort of thing is not my starting point.

Same. But I don't have the excuse of being in a foreign country, lol. Just the ADHD, some ASD tendencies, etc. Plus social anxiety, and a severe addiction to books 🙂

Why pay attention in geometry when you can read Stranger in a Strange Land? (wait...I think that was Algebra? No clue, lol)

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On 11/18/2019 at 4:36 PM, knitgrl said:

I don't think I would ever describe homeschooling as convenient, except the part where we can sleep in and not have to have kids on the bus by 7:30am. 😆

I've found it to be easier than dealing with traditional school.  Or maybe it would be more accurate to say that the difficulties are in different areas.

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21 hours ago, EKS said:

I've found it to be easier than dealing with traditional school.  Or maybe it would be more accurate to say that the difficulties are in different areas.

This, I think. Personally, the school difficulties are in areas that would be more stressful for me than the difficulties involved in homeschooling.

But, really, what I meant when I first said that the homeschoolers I know do it for convenience is that it's convenient for them to have the kids do their work online with fairly little input from the parents. Of course the schedule itself is convenient too. They don't have to mess with curriculum, teaching (though I do know some who will help their kids), getting kids ready and out the door, adjusting vacation schedules, etc. It's all pretty convenient.

I don't think it's wrong to have convenience as a reason for homeschooling. I've just seen a lot of families for whom it's the only or major consideration, and academics isn't considered at all. Someone had commented that apparently there are homeschoolers for whom academics aren't a priority (something like that) and it struck me as interesting that I've never met any irl for whom academics was even part of their decision. 

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