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Kind of s/o dangerous sports

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5 hours ago, sweet2ndchance said:

Dh is absolutely adament that ds will not play football or other contact sports like he did as a kid. There are so many other ways for ds to get exercise and take risks without increasing his risk of multiple head injuries. He remembers all the times his coaches would tell him to "walk it off" or "get back in there" when he now knows he had just suffered a brain injury and should have been told to sit down or see a doctor. He was never knocked unconscious so it was assumed that he was fine but the cumulative affect of all the "walk it off"s are what caused his heaches that still affect him to this day.

True, lots of kids play these sports and are fine but to dh, it is not worth the risk for his child to have to suffer and feel the pain he has to deal with everyday due to contact sports. He was so scared when I was pregnant with ds and we still didn't have anything conclusive on what was causing his headaches that it might be something genetic that he might pass to ds. Now that we know what caused his headaches, he still does not want to chance ds having the same fate as him. 

FWIW football and other sports are now implementing a concussion protocol at a young age.  Football has moved that direction for some time but last season (at least in our state) basketball also implemented it as well.  Too late for many who were injured in the past but a step in the right direction.

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10 hours ago, kdsuomi said:

Also, swimming isn't what most would be referring to when talking about typical youth sports. 

?? 

Please don't tell me that most Americans only define typical youth sports as basketball, baseball and football, with a sprinkling of soccer on the side.  Where do all the American Olympic athletes spring from if there are only these 4 "sports?"  How would you define "sports" then?

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6 minutes ago, wintermom said:

?? 

Please don't tell me that most Americans only define typical youth sports as basketball, baseball and football, with a sprinkling of soccer on the side.  Where do all the American Olympic athletes spring from if there are only these 4 "sports?"  How would you define "sports" then?

Most Americans would define typical youth sports by deciding factors:
-is it something available everywhere?
-is it something affordable to most kids?

It's easy to find basketball courts and fields in nearly any town.  Even my town, which has a serious non-kid friendly vibe, has empty fields and what could be considered a basketball court.  It's a lot harder in some places to find a year round pool, any sort of rink, a track that's not locked up during off times, or access to special equipment like lacrosse sticks.

The kids that get to play something else have other factors.  Here there are two (TWO!!) curling clubs for kids.  Want to guess where most of the olympic curlers come from?  It's not going to be southern Texas.

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1 minute ago, HomeAgain said:

Most Americans would define typical youth sports by deciding factors:
-is it something available everywhere?
-is it something affordable to most kids?


It's easy to find basketball courts and fields in nearly any town.  Even my town, which has a serious non-kid friendly vibe, has empty fields and what could be considered a basketball court.  It's a lot harder in some places to find a year round pool, any sort of rink, a track that's not locked up during off times, or access to special equipment like lacrosse sticks.

The kids that get to play something else have other factors.  Here there are two (TWO!!) curling clubs for kids.  Want to guess where most of the olympic curlers come from?  It's not going to be southern Texas.

That is interesting. It seems rather limiting of a definition when the reality of youth participation actually encompasses a much bigger variety of activities. If people live in cold, hilly regions and can ski with ease and affordability, it's not a sport because you can't do it in Texas?

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2 minutes ago, wintermom said:

That is interesting. It seems rather limiting of a definition when the reality of youth participation actually encompasses a much bigger variety of activities. If people live in cold, hilly regions and can ski with ease and affordability, it's not a sport because you can't do it in Texas?

It's certainly a sport!
It just wouldn't be considered typical nationwide.  It would be considered more regional.

Nearly every kid growing up in the U.S. will have some sort of experience with the sports listed above: football, basketball, soccer, baseball..
The schools will teach rules and form for them.  They can play with their friends on the weekend.  Babies will have soft stuffed versions of the various balls.  These sports are accessible.

Even if actual skiing is affordable, a lot of kids will not be able to have the equipment: skis, boots, poles, goggles...these are things that have to be replaced as a child grows and they're not cheap, even used.  You don't have to replace a football nearly as often.

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1 hour ago, HomeAgain said:

It's certainly a sport!
It just wouldn't be considered typical nationwide.  It would be considered more regional.

Nearly every kid growing up in the U.S. will have some sort of experience with the sports listed above: football, basketball, soccer, baseball..
The schools will teach rules and form for them.  They can play with their friends on the weekend.  Babies will have soft stuffed versions of the various balls.  These sports are accessible.

Even if actual skiing is affordable, a lot of kids will not be able to have the equipment: skis, boots, poles, goggles...these are things that have to be replaced as a child grows and they're not cheap, even used.  You don't have to replace a football nearly as often.

Though for kids who play more than a pick-up game of football the protective gear does add up and has to be replaced as they grow as well!

The participation rates thing I linked above shows participation rates by family income at the bottom; for every sport participation goes up as income increases.

I agree with you generally though, affordable playing opportunities are out there for baseball/softball, basketball, and soccer in most places. Football is a bit more regional/local--not a lot of football fields in most inner cities, and the game is not as much of an obsession everywhere as it is in Texas. Availability of pools is very spotty in parts of the country, and ice rinks even more so. 

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6 hours ago, wintermom said:

?? 

Please don't tell me that most Americans only define typical youth sports as basketball, baseball and football, with a sprinkling of soccer on the side.  Where do all the American Olympic athletes spring from if there are only these 4 "sports?"  How would you define "sports" then?

Our sports culture is very regional because our climate varies so much. The best surfers are from Hawaii or California. The best downhill skiers from the Rockies. Hockey is most popular in the states that border Canada. Some sports are played everywhere because they're indoor (basketball, volleyball) or a traditional high school sport with lots of ancillary activities (football with marching band and cheerleaders) or a summer sport that can be played pretty much anywhere from Anchorage to Miami like baseball.

Our population is so large that even niche sports attract a large enough population to produce good players. So we have things like girls rugby in Texas because even though a tiny percentage of girls play, there are enough to have a bunch of tournaments and support teams from Laredo to Lubbock.

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I also never said that other sports aren't sports. They just aren't often considered typical youth sports here. I love hockey and wanted to play it as a kid. However, it was far too expensive due to the limited availability of it when I was growing up in southern California. 

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56 minutes ago, chiguirre said:

Our sports culture is very regional because our climate varies so much. The best surfers are from Hawaii or California. The best downhill skiers from the Rockies. Hockey is most popular in the states that border Canada. Some sports are played everywhere because they're indoor (basketball, volleyball) or a traditional high school sport with lots of ancillary activities (football with marching band and cheerleaders) or a summer sport that can be played pretty much anywhere from Anchorage to Miami like baseball.

Our population is so large that even niche sports attract a large enough population to produce good players. So we have things like girls rugby in Texas because even though a tiny percentage of girls play, there are enough to have a bunch of tournaments and support teams from Laredo to Lubbock.

I agree about weather playing a big factor...

I do have a quibble about baseball...the best players/teams come from warm weather states bc they can play year round. 

I also want to add another geography related specialty sport...you need a access to a few miles of calmish water for crew teams...

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This old football player (and rugger) is off to go see his son's water polo match.

His high school has a pool, but no lacrosse team (which was his long-term primary youth sport). He also dabbled playing rugby, soccer, and did a couple of years of Saturday hockey clinic.

To the OP's question, for me concussion risks are something I take seriously. Against it I try to balance passion, body type, the responsibility of youth sport coaches and leagues, and the positive aspects of participation in team sports and contact sports in particular.

It is not an easy equation to balance. I loved playing football myself, as in I could not have imagined not playing. It was my passion. I did not attempt to impose "my passion" on my son. In fact, I tried offering up all reasonable alternatives to him.

I'm not convinced hockey is less risky that football for big concussions (vs more frequent sub-concussive hits typical in football), depending on how it is played and coached--based on my limited exposure to hockey and long-time involvement with football. Hockey helmet technology is very poor in my estimation. Hopefully the merger of Cascade (leaders in lacrosse helmets) and Bauer (hockey) lead to further improvements.

Lacrosse is similarly not without risks. Far fewer sub-concussive hits that football, but still risks of big hits leading to concussions. I coached youth lacrosse for 5 years. I was a loud voice in our league for rule reforms that would eject any player whose behavior put another at risk of concussion and expulsion from the league for any repeated offenses. I was frustrated in my efforts in a league that prided itself in player safety. I always taught my teams clean play. That was not universal, and in some cases player behavior was beyond the control of good and caring coaches. I crossed myself (figuratively) every Saturday hoping no one would leave the game with a brain injury. There was NOTHING I cared about more.

There are always risks to participation in team sports and activities like skiing, kayaking, etc.

No one said being a parent would be easy. I make different judgements for my kid than I made for myself. But had my participation in football been infringed in my youth there'd have been a riot going on. For sure.

Life is a balancing act. Missing out on physically demanding sports bring it own downsides. Must run. Water polo match awaits. 

Bill

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, chiguirre said:

Our sports culture is very regional because our climate varies so much. The best surfers are from Hawaii or California. The best downhill skiers from the Rockies. Hockey is most popular in the states that border Canada. Some sports are played everywhere because they're indoor (basketball, volleyball) or a traditional high school sport with lots of ancillary activities (football with marching band and cheerleaders) or a summer sport that can be played pretty much anywhere from Anchorage to Miami like baseball.

Our population is so large that even niche sports attract a large enough population to produce good players. So we have things like girls rugby in Texas because even though a tiny percentage of girls play, there are enough to have a bunch of tournaments and support teams from Laredo to Lubbock.

This is the case all around the world. Climate and tradition/culture plays a major role in the participating levels. However, the US is probably in the very best circumstance to have participants in a huge number of different sports because of that climate variation, large population, and culture (private and public sector) that supports sport participation. 

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Not at this stage.  All three played football the last two years but Australian rules is totally different anyway.  I won’t be devastated if they give up as they get older because the injury rate goes up.

dd is currently doing horse riding which is up there in terms of risk I guess.  And dh works in a job that’s classified as high risk.

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