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Homeschooled Kids Getting Enough Exercise?

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This is our first year homeschooling. I've noticed that my daughter (almost 10 years old) has gained a little weight since she's been home. She hasn't had her yearly check-up so I don't know where she falls on the weight distribution to know if she's officially overweight. 

She is not getting enough exercise since sh's been home. She attends a hybrid school a couple of days a week and has PE once a week. They have a very short outdoor recess at the hybrid school. She doesn't play any organized sports. She sometimes expresses interest in soccer but supposedly she's already "too old" to start soccer. She did gymnastics and dance a few years ago but did not want to continue with them. 

This is AZ so it's been very hot during the day until right about now. The neighborhood kids don't play outside during the summer. My daughter swam in our pool every day until about a month ago when the water began to get too cold. The neighborhood kids are starting to go outside about now but there aren't many kids and none of them are homeschooled. My daughter is an only child. 

Our family life right now is not conducive to promoting a family exercise culture. My life is crazy because I work outside of the home and homeschool. I try to use our elliptical trainer a few times a week but definitely need to do a better job with that. My husband has a long commute and has had a lot of physical issues this year with knee surgery. 

How can I help her to get more physical activity in her life? She needs a new bike so I directed my husband to take care of that this week. I recommended that they start a father/daughter tradition of weekly Saturday morning bike rides until it gets too hot again. 

What about kids exercise videos? Do any of your kids use them? 

Diet is another issue. Since she's been home during the day she's started snacking throughout the day. I always have fruit available for snacks. I also have snack food items like Cheez-its in the pantry for her snack at the hybrid school but she eats these during the days she is home. How can I cut down on the snacking when she's home all day? 

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9 minutes ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

This is our first year homeschooling. I've noticed that my daughter (almost 10 years old) has gained a little weight since she's been home. She hasn't had her yearly check-up so I don't know where she falls on the weight distribution to know if she's officially overweight. 

She is not getting enough exercise since sh's been home. She attends a hybrid school a couple of days a week and has PE once a week. They have a very short outdoor recess at the hybrid school. She doesn't play any organized sports. She sometimes expresses interest in soccer but supposedly she's already "too old" to start soccer. She did gymnastics and dance a few years ago but did not want to continue with them. 

This is AZ so it's been very hot during the day until right about now. The neighborhood kids don't play outside during the summer. My daughter swam in our pool every day until about a month ago when the water began to get too cold. The neighborhood kids are starting to go outside about now but there aren't many kids and none of them are homeschooled. My daughter is an only child. 

Our family life right now is not conducive to promoting a family exercise culture. My life is crazy because I work outside of the home and homeschool. I try to use our elliptical trainer a few times a week but definitely need to do a better job with that. My husband has a long commute and has had a lot of physical issues this year with knee surgery. 

How can I help her to get more physical activity in her life? She needs a new bike so I directed my husband to take care of that this week. I recommended that they start a father/daughter tradition of weekly Saturday morning bike rides until it gets too hot again. 

What about kids exercise videos? Do any of your kids use them? 

Diet is another issue. Since she's been home during the day she's started snacking throughout the day. I always have fruit available for snacks. I also have snack food items like Cheez-its in the pantry for her snack at the hybrid school but she eats these during the days she is home. How can I cut down on the snacking when she's home all day? 

 

Check out the neighborhood YMCA or equivalent family gyms.  Many home school families in the places we've lived take part in rec leagues, open gyms, and some have climbing equipment and open (indoor) swims that kids her age love.

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Would she be interested in any form of martial arts? People start at all different ages and ability levels. Also, I read that rec leagues for sports like soccer are becoming much more popular, so maybe see if there is one for soccer she could join. I know you said family exercise isn’t much of a possibility now, but how about just a half hour of biking together or with just one of you after dinner a few times per week in addition to the Saturday morning father/daughter ride?

As for snacking, personally I’d get rid of things like the Cheez-its altogether if they are a temptation, and only keep healthy food available. Pairing some protein with the fruit may help her to fill full longer. And make sure she isn’t drinking empty calories like soda or juice.

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We have a shelf for "travelling snacks".  That shelf is snacks that can be packed for outside classes. Granola bars, pre-packaged nuts, etc. Those snacks are not eaten at home. (We need to do this to keep grocery costs down.)  At home snacks are healthier and require more effort from the kids.  A bowl of yogurt, hummus and cut-up carrots, cottage cheese, cut up an apple with peanut butter, make an egg w toast, etc.

The public schooled neighbor kids will play with my homeschooled kids  ;)   I'm assuming those are kids she played with before being homeschooled? If so, then nudge her out the door to find so-and-so. I sometimes make a specific suggestions. I might remind my ds, "You know, Connor's mother requires him to walk the dog, then do homework. I just heard the bus drop off Connor. Grab our dog and walk with Connor."

I cannot make suggestions about a specific sport. That's probably something you need to ask local parents.  They would know which types of sports have opportunities for 10 year olds to start. In our area, the girls' volleyball teams won't really get started until middle school. So, that's a sport that everyone comes in new to the game.

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This was always an issue for us too and wasn’t solved until we put our kids In swim team and made it a priority. In fact my teen daughter quit swimming and is really struggling to keep the weight off 

As far as snacking cheez it’s should not even make it into your pantry as they have 0 nutritional value. Just stop buying any white carbs at all. Choices limited equals Better snacking. Good replacements are like you said fruit, low fat yogurts and cheese sticks, and seeds and nuts such as sunflower seeds or almonds  in limited quantities. hummus and carrots are also favorites here. 
 

I made the mistake of buying a bag of pretzels the other week and now I regret it as they are just totally empty calories and Hugh glycemic index. Those pretzels might magically disappear and be replaced with more carrots 🙂 
 

 

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Also my kids spent the first 10 years of their childhood I. South Florida where people also don’t  play outside after school until November or December, so I understand your pain and that’s why I think your only option is organized sports -

another idea is to have her go outside after dinner to play with neighborhood kids. In Florida they would all play after dinner. It still wasn’t enough exercise but something 🙂 and fun 🙂

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Choose a sport (recreational or competitive), prioritize it, and make it mandatory. They can change to do something else each season if it's not to their liking. This is how my peeps met our family fitness goals while homeschooling.

 

Edited by Sneezyone
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I feel like this is an issue for many American kids in general. Nothing you're describing to me feels connected to homeschooling per se. Sometimes homeschooling allows kids to be more active. Sometimes school does, simply because kids walk or play afterwards with friends. In general, school PE and recess doesn't do enough to give kids the activity they need. Food also plays a role - sometimes kids snack more because they're home and it's easy and available. Other times, food at home is healthier and better than options at school. Basically, I wouldn't blame homeschooling.

Seconding the above. I think you just have to make it a priority. I find it tough too, especially for my kid who is less active and interested in being active.

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Family gyms are great - they have some fun classes for kids.

To throw out some of the ideas we’ve done over the years:

- organized classes (swim, swim team, dance, whatever is appropriate with at least weekly meetings)

- Parkour!  Our local parkour gym is amazing.  So much fun.  Our kids love parkour and we always come back to it.  Start with a beginner class, and your kid can work her way up.  Sometimes it’s called “free running” or even “ninja class”... lots of fun and very physical.

- Yoga for kids videos.

- There’s a homeschool PE curriculum, I can’t recall the name but it was fun in elementary school.

- after school play with neighbors and friends.  We’d organize kick ball in the cul de sac and improvise tag games.  And something they call Minecraft RL (they act it out).  Nerf gun wars.  
 

- Trampoline.  Oh my goodness.  I resisted for years and relented only because I had a sensory seeker.  Wow.  Totally worth it.  Outside.  We have safety rules, of course.

- Mini trampoline in house.  We did frequent breaks.

I struggled with this in grade school, too, so we had to sort of brainstorm.  Hope it helps!

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Since DD is the one who would be doing the exercise, it's critical to get her input about what would be of interest to HER as far as exercise. If there's not any buy-in or interest in -- or if there's actual outright dislike of -- a physical activity, it's only going to become a battle and make it that much harder to get her moving with any kind of exercise.

Doing something active with someone always helps make it more interesting, so biking with dad would be great. Or if she joined you in an exercise video. You and DD could take a brisk 20 minute walk together around the neighborhood before starting school each morning.

Also think in terms of short "bursts" of activity. What about during the day while you're homeschooling? For example, several times throughout the day, at the end of working for 50 minutes, stop for a 10-minute "brain break", and you both run to the corner and back at one end of your street, and then to the other corner and back. Or do an inside activity for 5 minutes -- jump rope, bounce on a mini indoor trampoline, put on a lively song and dance vigorously...

Accomplishing a set goal from an outside source can help keep you accountable and be more fun. What about together committing to completing the Presidential Fitness Challenge this year? Another "challenge" that can be done in your own timing and way, as a family, is if you've read the book or watched the movies of The Lord of the Rings -- The Walk to Rivendell Challenge.

Does she have friends in the hybrid school? Can you meet regularly with them for active play? (hikes, "airsoft wars", running around in the the backyard or at a park, etc.)
Or do any of the other students have classes in something active that DD can join (ballet, ballroom dance, folk dancing, martial arts, ice skating, tennis, etc.) For example, dance might be more interesting again if done with a friend. Also, some studios have recreational level of lessons -- for example, if you're in the Phoenix Valley area, it looks like the AZ All Stars has "recreational and competitive gymnastics, dance, cheer, and fitness instruction for ages 6-18."

While "club" sports are highly competitive (and expensive!), what about signing up for a weekly Parks & Rec class? One of our DSs had fun doing indoor hockey and basketball through P&R. The other did baseball through NYS (National Youth Sports). Again, if you're in the Phoenix Valley area, here's the website for that area. Both options were much more relaxed and less about aggressively trying to train to become a Division 1 level athlete by college, lol. Another "relaxed" activity might be  Sports Kids AZ, which has homeschool and after school physical activity options.

Or perhaps there is a "cause" that DD would love to support -- she could train for several weeks for a walk-a-thon, and get sponsors (relatives, friends, neighbors, etc.) to support her for each mile walked, and then walk 10-15 miles on the "Big Day", and then she gets to donate the proceeds to her cause. Or, if she likes biking, set it up as a long bike ride with dad as a "bike-a-thon". Or see if there is already a fundraiser for a cause of her interest that is doing something similar and join in.

Not very strenuous at all, but fun and it gets you moving a bit is an After School Bowling League.

Edited by Lori D.
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Be careful with overuse of mini tramp- one of my kids developed a weird lower back issue because of it which required physical therapy for 3 months, probably 30 minutes total should be the limit 🙂 but you can look it up 

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Your title (Homeschool kids not getting enough exercise) is not our experience at all. We live in a temperate climate though where my kids ran around outside, hiked, climbed trees, rode bikes and skateboards etc. We did homeschool park days once a month for awhile. One child did taekwando. Another runs long distance. Both were active in the YMCA. I also specifically taught PE at home (stuff like four square and other games) when my kids were small. And both kids took swimming lessons. I found that homeschooling gave our particular family more freedom to be active. 

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I think this definitely can be an issue with schooled kids too.  I think if you want active kids you have to model an active healthy lifestyle and  you have prioritize it.  Maybe you join a gym and all goes 4 times a week.  Maybe she joins rec soccer. Maybe you prioritize getting out in some way - family walks after dinner.  Has she completed a course of swim lessons?  Does she swim well.  If she is still working on that, signing up for swim lessons could work.     That got us to the pool 2X a week through some winters.  I required my kids to get through red cross level 6.  At that point, swim club or team could be something to look into.  

I think if you just TELL her to do something, it's going to be much harder to stay on board for longer term.  I'd make it a family project and I would consider signing her up for something going forward.  

And I wouldn't worry too much, though if she's being inactive I think choosing to prioritize some more activity is a great idea.  Some girls just fluctuate weight a bit going into puberty.  

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Geocaching-just your family or find a teen group.

The local Y may know of groups or clubs for teens for running, biking, tennis,climbing etc

Teen archery groups fill up fast around here. Frisbee golf. One way to meet people her age. I have noticed more skateboarders around lately too. Maybe the local animal shelter would let her walk dogs,if she likes dogs. Or walk neighbors dogs during day.

 

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I like your idea of setting an example yourself with the elliptical trainer. Could you all take a family morning walk before it gets too hot?  The fresh morning air really helps one of my kids focus. I go every morning and he goes along if he is up. Lately, he has been asking me to get him up because he really enjoys it. 

My kids also do TKD and are active playing with neighbors outside almost every day. There is a big soccer goal in our yard and about 12 soccer balls. Usually there are one or two of my kids and some neighbors around using the equipment. They have invented some combination and cooperative games to play for when they don’t have even teams. (Right now they are playing “soccer tag”, in fact). 

Also. I have a 10 year old daughter and the coolest thing in the world to her is to be outside playing in the dark. We got a big assortment of light up wristbands and little click on/off lights we keep in a box near our front door and now that it is getting darker earlier they are using the lights a lot. Tag and hide and seek are a lot of fun in the dark when you also have to hide your light up wristbands!

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I have an only child, too, and all her friends live outside our neighborhood. Things we do to stay healthy and active:

Swim class twice a week at an indoor pool (she previously did Tae Kwon Do). Swimming and martial arts are great, because kids can progress at their own pace. Also, even kids who are not naturally athletic can learn to perform well in both sports--and both are useful life skills.

Elliptical with a tv in front of it! She can watch up to two shows a day while doing the elliptical and she has lost weight doing just that! 

An adult sized hopping ball (with a handle) or exercise ball in the basement--she's learned to do lots of "tricks" on it and all that fun bouncing is actually good exercise.

Mini trampoline in the basement.

Yoga videos.

Playing at the park.

Bike rides with dad.

Dog walking with mom.

Edited by MercyA
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10 yo girls often gain weight before a growth spurt.

Our family always played organized sports PLUS lessons (swimming, golf, etc) free play outside PLUS mom (me! Bc I was more patient and would do it for longer than dad, hahaaha) helping with sports skills...catching, batting, kicking around.

Dad used to take the kids to playgrounds and play "monster" which involved chasing them around the equipment. They'd go to different parks and each park had a different storyline/monster. 

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Exercising has two options:
1. It either has to be a family thing.
or
2. It has to be a parent directed thing.

It can be both, but I find I have to be as diligent about finding P.E. credits as I do math or language arts.  I even have it as a line in my online planner - I can see which days we did park days with our group or what ds has done on his own because I record it.  On the flip, it lets me know when it's been a while.

We've decided on ds doing one sport at a time along with family activity.  Anything else is gravy and I'm grateful, but I make sure these two things are kept on the calendar.  We do bike rides together, rollerblade, swim, yoga, and nature hikes.  Most sports are at least a 2 day a week commitment: practice and game, so that's another two days each week that I know he's getting exercise.

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In general, I think my kids are far more active than they would be if they were in school. 

At the local elementary schools, the kids only have 25 minutes combined for lunch + recess, but another 10 minute recess in the afternoon.  That means they are only getting at most 20 minutes of recess a day...and that is if they eat very quickly and don't have to take time to put on outdoor clothes before going outside (we live in Michigan where we need a lot of cold-weather clothing).  Then they also get an hour a week of gym class.

My kids (ages 4, 6, 8 and 10) move around a lot more than that.  First of all, they spend very little time sitting still.  All my 3 older boys have ADHD, so they do math while rolling around on the floor, march in place while writing, read while holding themselves in a plank position, and contort themselves in twisted yoga pretzels while listening to read alouds.

Second, they have a lot of time each week to participate in physical education extracurriculars.  My kids average 4-5 hours a week in gym/swimming/rock climbing/ninja classes.

Lastly, because school gets done pretty quickly, my kiddos also have a lot of time for free, active play.  It may not be running laps levels of activity, but playing imaginative games with dress-up clothes, fighting battles with nerf guns, getting up and down and moving around while playing legos all keep them moving much more than sitting still.

As for snacks, they have always been scheduled at our house.  We do have some snack-y snacks in the house, but the kids are not allowed to help themselves.  Since I schedule and serve mostly-healthy morning and afternoon snacks, then I find that any further clamoring for food is mostly a delay tactic rather than actual hunger.  So, if a child is whining about being hungry, I will almost always offer carrots or a cheese stick...and if they don't want either of those then I conclude they weren't really hungry to start with.

Wendy

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If she is interested in soccer, it's not too late to start rec soccer.  I would start there.  We did weekly family hiking trips for much of the time we were homeschooling, so that helped.  

My 5th grader is now in school for the first time and I've been nicely surprised with it.  Besides 2 recesses a day totaling more more than an hour they have PE 3x a week.  Also, he's running cross country this fall and will do track and field in the spring.  

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5 hours ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

Diet is another issue. Since she's been home during the day she's started snacking throughout the day. I always have fruit available for snacks. I also have snack food items like Cheez-its in the pantry for her snack at the hybrid school but she eats these during the days she is home. How can I cut down on the snacking when she's home all day? 

So if she has unmedicated ADHD, she might be more prone to grazing, impulsive or mindless eating, etc. Some of the ADHD meds, like Vyvanse, are on-label for binge-eating and have that nice side effect of cutting down the mindless snacking and impulsive eating that leads to weight gain. 

Also she might just flat be HUNGRY with looming puberty and need more frequent snacks. You might need to toss the Cheezits (which are kind of addictive, lol) and only have around acceptable snacks. You could keep them together or put up lists. She might like the convenience of portioned fruit smoothies (Sam's Club sells these) or small yogurt cups. They also sell single serving guacamole cups.

Does she have sensory issues or anything affecting her comfort with eating? 

In general, you'd like to see one hour of red faced a day. That's how @Laura Corin put it years ago, so that's how I've tried to think of it. Given your weather and that AZ has creepy things (yes?), maybe a Y membership or streaming exercise videos through the youtube on your fire tv/roku/smart tv? At the Y, you could just go walk together 2-3 nights a week. You need to be taking care of yourself too. :smile:

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3 hours ago, itsheresomewhere said:

At her age, weight gains comes with growth spurts.  Don’t forgot to remember that.  
 

Yup my dd would fill out then spurt up. So if we were getting worried she looked fluffy, we'd wait and up she would go. So far ds doesn't, but that's actually a little scary. With him I'm just constantly offering food, lol. 

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I haven’t read all the replies yet, but as I keep scrolling past your thread title, a thought keeps nagging at me. 

If I were to get a do-over of my home teaching years, one thing I would definitely change would be to MAKE time and budget funds for physical fitness, treating it as a priority. Fitness is a habit best formed in the younger years. Soccer, swimming, martial arts, cross country running, regular gym workouts - I’d choose something that demanded work and generated sweat and we would all do it together, like it or not. 

My sons were naturally more active - maybe that was their personalities, but personally I believe it is due to being boys. My daughters like to be active, but they have neither the strength nor the endurance they could have trained themselves into had fitness been instilled at younger ages. They are working on fitness now - gym, running, yoga - but the mental part of it is challenging because it was not an integral part of their early lives. 

That’s my two cents - now I’ll go read and see if I’ve just repeated someone else. 😆

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My kids don't function well if they are not active, and outside classes is what they need.

Some that have worked well for us include Martial arts, tumbling, and Irish dance. All of my kids except the toddler are in physical activity classes at least three hours each week, everyone nine and up is doing a minimum of five hours a week, usually at least double that for teens.

It means our schedule is crazy, but we honestly function better on so many levels with lots of physical activity.

Edited by maize
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Thanks for the ideas. 

To clarify, there's no ADHD or any other disorder. It could be a pending growth spurt. A few weeks ago, she developed breast buds. She's about a month from turning 10. 

She's made some friends at the hybrid school. It was slow going at first but finally she began to make friends. But none of those girls live anywhere near us. 

I think some of this inactivity is because it's so new to her to be home during the day. 

She played with the neighborhood kids when she was in school but there aren't that many kids and sometimes they are not around. There is only one girl on the block. She's a year older than DD and they are very different. They play together by default but they get on each others' nerves. 

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We do run into this issue too. We just don't have room in our schedule to commit to organised sports. We try to get to the pool - I'd like to say weekly/biweekly but in reality we're lucky to go once a month. The kids do a lot of at home stuff, intentional physical work (wood chopping, lawn mowing etc) as well as incidental (running around playing, walking, bike riding etc).

It is an issue for us because it is an issue for me. Dd and I keep planning to do walks/jogs but we both give up too fast... that's my fault.

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5 hours ago, Margaret in CO said:

What about horse riding? If the kid does stall cleaning to pay for it, double whammy! Hauling hay, water, and manure is hard work. 

 eh, I wouldn't recommend this avenue unless your daughter is begging for it on her own and horse crazy.  It's an extremely expensive, dangerous sport unless you live on a ranch and grow up with horses, it is truly very very expensive and dangerous. 

Now, if she is horse crazy and asking for it, it is a life changing worthwhile experience, although there is a very inherent risk of extreme danger.  BUT some girls (and boys) can't live without horses 🙂

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1 hour ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

Thanks for the ideas. 

To clarify, there's no ADHD or any other disorder. It could be a pending growth spurt. A few weeks ago, she developed breast buds. She's about a month from turning 10. 

She's made some friends at the hybrid school. It was slow going at first but finally she began to make friends. But none of those girls live anywhere near us. 

I think some of this inactivity is because it's so new to her to be home during the day. 

She played with the neighborhood kids when she was in school but there aren't that many kids and sometimes they are not around. There is only one girl on the block. She's a year older than DD and they are very different. They play together by default but they get on each others' nerves. 

 

We lived in five different neighborhoods and in ONLY One did the kids go out to play after school and that was the lowest socio-economic neighborhood.  Unfortunately the modern kids "don't play...they march." that is to activities ,after school care, math class, music lessons and on and on and on.  We hardly ever found kids to play with mine, even if they really liked them they just were never, ever home except Sunday, and even then that was usually filled with catching up or the kids would be zoned out exhausted in front of a TV.

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Just one thought about a ten year old girl starting the very beginning of puberty:  I would focus on healthy habits but not on weight itself.  So definitely work on healthy exercise habits and healthy snacks and healthy eating in general.  But I would not focus on the number on the scale or even on added fat - esp. since as others have pointed out, weight can fluctuate naturally with growth spurts.  This doesn't mean that I am advocating childhood obesity (though it sounds like that isn't a concern per se) but it does mean that healthy attitudes towards different body shapes and compositions need to start by this age and are often modeled by Mom and Dad. 

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We have a Wiiu and they had games like walk it out, & outdoor adventure that we used when we had to stay inside. There are probably newer versions. We also got a large exercise ball and they sat on that doing schoolwork or at the computer. I did the Wiiu with them a lot of the time and it is fun.

 

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3 hours ago, Calming Tea said:

 eh, I wouldn't recommend this avenue unless your daughter is begging for it on her own and horse crazy.  It's an extremely expensive, dangerous sport unless you live on a ranch and grow up with horses, it is truly very very expensive and dangerous. 

Now, if she is horse crazy and asking for it, it is a life changing worthwhile experience, although there is a very inherent risk of extreme danger.  BUT some girls (and boys) can't live without horses 🙂

Ah, but those memories last a life time! Dangerous? My kids have been hurt worse doing other things. It was so fun to watch dd on her absolutely green 2yo at the rodeo grounds today. We hauled him down as it was a gymkhana, and it was good for him to experience the chaos. 

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11 hours ago, Ordinary Shoes said:

I try to use our elliptical trainer a few times a week but definitely need to do a better job with that. 

How can I help her to get more physical activity in her life? She needs a new bike so I directed my husband to take care of that this week. 

 

We have the hot weather issue here too. Would a stationary bike next to your elliptical trainer be feasible? That way she gets to bike on the stationary bike while you are on the elliptical trainer. I find it easier to exercise when my kids are exercising and I make them take exercise breaks when they have been sitting down for hours. I sign my kids up for weekly tennis lessons because I know we will slack otherwise. My husband does not exercise at all and the bulk of his walking is shopping as he is a shopaholic. So it is up to me to ensure our kids exercise. 

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Your situation does sound challenging. Here are some little ideas. Have a set break time every day (maybe half hour/20 minutes) Can you put on fun music and have her dance and jump around during that time ? or have a mini trampoline as well? Gym mats for practicing gymnastics? Ikea might sell a balance beam. Or, when the weather is not too hot, make it her outdoor time. Give her a jump rope and balls and other fun outdoor stuff she can do alone. Monkey bars? Basketball hoop? My 13-year old runs around on his own here and there if he is outside. When I was that age I spent a lot of time throwing a ball against a wall.

If it is too cold to swim outdoors is there an indoor pool where she can go?

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Also, maybe she can help with physical chores? Mowing, raking, weeding, carrying laundry around the house, dusting, bringing groceries in, cleaning floors, etc.


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17 hours ago, Margaret in CO said:

Ah, but those memories last a life time! Dangerous? My kids have been hurt worse doing other things. It was so fun to watch dd on her absolutely green 2yo at the rodeo grounds today. We hauled him down as it was a gymkhana, and it was good for him to experience the chaos. 

 

I know so many people with fractured skulls, mutiple brain injuries, one who is brain damaged for life, one who has lost her sense of smell, one who spent a SIX MONTHS in physical therapy rehab due to dozens of shattered pieces of her leg and hip, many hundreds of cases of regular fractures to wrist, and legs, one who had sepsis because a horse stepped on her foot and within 24 hours she developed sepsis, numerous cases of helicopter rides to the trauma center...these are all people I know personally from one large upscale barn/facility with several experienced trainers. 

It's great, but unless your kid is begging for it, not worth it.

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2 hours ago, Calming Tea said:

 

I know so many people with fractured skulls, mutiple brain injuries, one who is brain damaged for life, one who has lost her sense of smell, one who spent a SIX MONTHS in physical therapy rehab due to dozens of shattered pieces of her leg and hip, many hundreds of cases of regular fractures to wrist, and legs, one who had sepsis because a horse stepped on her foot and within 24 hours she developed sepsis, numerous cases of helicopter rides to the trauma center...these are all people I know personally from one large upscale barn/facility with several experienced trainers. 

It's great, but unless your kid is begging for it, not worth it.

It's a safer alternative here, over hockey or football!

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My soon to be 10 year old girl is filling out a bit. I'm assuming a growth spurt is coming. 

Most of the homeschoolers I know are fairly active. My own kids are pretty active. They play outside. We have bikes and balls and a trampoline. Most of them also do TKD. My most stationary kid is 5'9" and just over 100 pounds. He drinks a Boost drink after eating a meal 3x per day. I want him to have the extra calories while he is growing. Weight is complicated. Two kids can have the same behaviors but  very different outcomes. I would stop buying the processed snacks and do what you can to promote activity without making it about her weight. 

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