Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

easypeasy

ACT change - Students can re-take portions of the test?!

Recommended Posts

Wow!  I hadn’t heard about that.  It would help my daughter since it appears something was messed up with the math section of her test in September.  It will be interesting to see how colleges react since some require a certain score in a single sitting for scholarship eligibility.  I agree that I am not sure how I feel about the change especially to computer based on a test that is as fast paced as the ACT.  Plus it is really different to prep and take a 40 minute test than preparing to take a 4 hour one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Mom2mthj said:

Plus it is really different to prep and take a 40 minute test than preparing to take a 4 hour one.

I wonder how they will deal with the score skewing from taking a single section?  Test fatigue is very real. Only having to take a single section will most definitely alter scores.

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I wonder how they will deal with the score skewing from taking a single section?  Test fatigue is very real. Only having to take a single section will most definitely alter scores.


This change could be enormously helpful for one of my kids, but I can also imagine it quickly becoming a situation where more affluent kids sign up to take the test multiple times, and then only prep and concentrate on one or two sections each time.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


This change could be enormously helpful for one of my kids, but I can also imagine it quickly becoming a situation where more affluent kids sign up to take the test multiple times, and then only prep and concentrate on one or two sections each time.  

A couple of my kids specifically did not do well on the ACT bc it is a reading heavy test which left them exhausted. Since then, I have them all shift to the SAT. My physics grad student did extremely poorly on the science reasoning section bc he was so fatigued by the end of the exam (with absolutely no relation to his science reasoning.) Take the whole test 1 time and then multiple times one section at a time. Yeah.  Very, very different scores.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

A couple of my kids specifically did not do well on the ACT bc it is a reading heavy test which left them exhausted. Since then, I have them all shift to the SAT. My physics grad student did extremely poorly on the science reasoning section bc he was so fatigued by the end of the exam (with absolutely no relation to his science reasoning.) Take the whole test 1 time and then multiple times one section at a time. Yeah.  Very, very different scores.

 

And also a very different junior/senior year with test after test after test.

For my medically fragile kid, it's easy to imagine that something could happen and one section of the test would need to be scrapped.  So, being able to make up just that one section, would be fantastic.  But for my typical kids, I see this as just one more thing to contribute to the stress I see so many kids around here under.  Because if other people are taking advantage of this, then the competition just goes up a notch.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems like really huge news.  Not sure what to make of it. I agree with pp who said this will likely skew scores dramatically. Those of us in the know and with the resources to take the test multiple times could exploit this to great advantage.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

And also a very different junior/senior year with test after test after test.

For my medically fragile kid, it's easy to imagine that something could happen and one section of the test would need to be scrapped.  So, being able to make up just that one section, would be fantastic.  But for my typical kids, I see this as just one more thing to contribute to the stress I see so many kids around here under.  Because if other people are taking advantage of this, then the competition just goes up a notch.  

I wouldn't worry about it. It probably won't exist by the time your kids are old enough. My kids have been taking these tests long enough for me to have seen so many changes that I just roll my eyes now. No essay. With essay optional. Essay required. Essay optional. Most schools not wanting essay. 1600 scores. 2400 scores. 1600 scores. No score choice. Score choice.

whatever. I think testing companies are revamping to their own demise.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was just talking about the shift to taking the ACT on the computer with a senior that I'm tutoring. She and I both agreed we do better with the paper tests but the younger kids coming up through the ranks are used to computer tests.

I do wonder how the scores will change with the computer tests, but as I pointed out to some moms tonight, they'll just renorm once they switch over.

Being able to take the science section in a single sitting would likely have helped my dd#1. You have to really go quickly in that section to get through it all & you are exhausted by then.

None of dd#1's schools accepted ACT superscores. I wonder how colleges will react to the switch in 2020...

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I wouldn't worry about it. It probably won't exist by the time your kids are old enough. My kids have been taking these tests long enough for me to have seen so many changes that I just roll my eyes now. No essay. With essay optional. Essay required. Essay optional. Most schools not wanting essay. 1600 scores. 2400 scores. 1600 scores. No score choice. Score choice.

whatever. I think testing companies are revamping to their own demise.

 

Here, the norm is that kids are taking these tests by 10th, so 3 years for my oldest.  

For us, though, the advantages for one kid will outweigh the disadvantages for the others, but you're probably right that by the time he's old enough they'll have changed it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My junior (who could benefit from this in the fall) has a first choice school that super scores for automatic merit. As it is we are looking at his ACT strategically and trying to figure out which tests he can scrape up just a couple more points. I worry that once one test can be taken at a time the scores will skew higher and then the cutoffs will go even higher. While I don’t feel like it will make much difference for my kid it is kind of annoying to think it is one more tweak in trying to hit a certain score. I’m tired of chasing points and test prep. It’s necessary for us because the money is such a factor but it is kind of annoying to have so much strategy at play on these tests.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I've had time to churn on it for a bit - I'm frustrated. This would have really helped my dd who just graduated because she gets so exhausted with these tests. If she could have focused on two sections at a time? She'd have had a 36 on every section! lol (ok, not really... but...)

And yes, it will absolutely lean to benefiting wealthier, system-savvy families and kids and leave others behind in the dust. It seems to override those schools that don't superscore the ACT (which is most schools, iirc).

Right now the test at least compares Fuji apples to Gala apples to Red Delicious apples. This change makes the leap to apples and oranges entirely.

Ugh, these tests.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if this is a way for the ACT to try to differentiate itself from the SAT in another way. "We're the test you can take one section at a time!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CollegeBoard just announced exam policy change that will allow all testers to redo 10  questions from their  SAT exam  for a yet to be determined fee.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, RootAnn said:

I wonder if this is a way for the ACT to try to differentiate itself from the SAT in another way. "We're the test you can take one section at a time!"

It is total marketing!  Now instead of paying for 2 or 3 tests people will pay for 4 or 5!

  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's definitely a relief for parents and students. It would have benefited my oldest. 

I do worry that: 

-scholarships will now require even higher scores because it will be easier to get closer to perfect scores

-the students that rely on their state's required but free ACT test their junior year to take the test and can't afford to test further will be penalized

-more and more colleges are opting out of these tests...I think they are getting a bit desperate.

-this is just a way to open up super scoring to all colleges

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This one-section-at-a time option would be moot for students interested in schools that don’t superscore, right? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I told my son about this, he said "But then it wouldn't be standardized anymore."  And he's right.  At the moment, the curve for the science scores, for example, are partially based on the fact that everyone is tired when they take that part of the test.  If some people are tired because they have done the entire thing before encountering the science section, and some people are just doing the science section and nothing else, that means that, at a minimum, new scores should not be compared to old ones.

I wonder why they keep trying to make this stuff easier when what they should be doing is raising the ceiling.

Edited by EKS
  • Like 6
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, EKS said:

When I told my son about this, he said "But then it wouldn't be standardized anymore."  And he's right.  At the moment, the curve for the science scores, for example, are partially based on the fact that everyone is tired when they take that part of the test.  If some people are tired because they have done the entire thing before encountering the science section, and some people are just doing the science section and nothing else, that means that, at a minimum, new scores should not be compared to old ones.

I wonder why they keep trying to make this stuff easier when what they should be doing is raising the ceiling.

It really comes down to the tests don't actually test what they are presented as testing. For example, they test reading speed over deep comprehension/verbal skills, math speed over complex math skills, endurance over 4 hrs vs. actual knowledge, etc.

I can't see a real motive for this other more $$ for more retesting. How Us will process the new data is definitely unclear.

Maybe ultimately they are planning the equivalent of single subtests similar to subject tests that represent derper understanding vs rewarding speed on superficial questions???

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One article I've read says the test must be taken in full initially before retaking particular sections.  I'm not sure how I feel about the test being computerized but I do like that students can get their scores back in a couple of business days versus weeks.  That will help alleviate anxiety and increase studying time for the next test.

Our local state university just announced recently that it will no longer look at ACT for merit-based scholarships and will rely on a student's GPA.  This sounds great, in theory, but we all know that GPAs can be inflated by taking less rigorous courses, easier instructors, or by homeschool parents 😉  When asked by a fellow homeschool mom how her child would be measured, the university told her they would be looking at the "program" the homeschooler used.  When asked what they meant by "program," they said they'd look at the curriculum.  When asked why curriculum because our state doesn't even require a "curriculum," they went blank and couldn't answer....LOL. 

All that to say that this whole college admissions process is innately flawed.  I've got a 10th grader this year so all these changes WILL affect him, for better or worse 😕 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have mixed feelings about it.  As usual, it will benefit people the most who can tutor sections individually, pay for multiple retakes, and give up multiple Saturdays.  But both my kids would benefit.  My kid's final score was great, but 2 of his subscores were on the lower end of what he was getting at home.  Also having a kid with high scores who did a fair number of practice tests, he found some sections are easier than others.  Especially in the math and science sections.  Things will just skew upward and everyone will waste more time jumping through this inane hoop.  

I definitely think it's just another way for the ACT to money grab.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I wonder how they will deal with the score skewing from taking a single section?  Test fatigue is very real. Only having to take a single section will most definitely alter scores.

I agree.  The ACT folks must also agree since they are not permitting kids to just register to take 4 individual tests - they must take an entire ACT test before they can register for an individual subsection sitting.  I wonder if colleges will require students to submit the scores from the test taken in a single sitting, or if the students can simply submit four subscores obtained from 4 individual sittings.  

This move will just feed the testing frenzy and line the pockets of the ACT.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, alewife said:

The ACT folks must also agree since they are not permitting kids to just register to take 4 individual tests - they must take an entire ACT test before they can register for an individual subsection sitting.  I wonder if colleges will require students to submit the scores from the test taken in a single sitting, or if the students can simply submit four subscores obtained from 4 individual sittings.  

 

What is also unclear...can you take the full test then take individual sections to slowly replace your original score?  Can you take two individual sections in one day?  The possibilities seem endless.  For better or worse, I wish they would just leave these tests alone, but now we have a new game we have to figure out.  I still remember when you had points taken away for a wrong answer on the SAT.  I see this as an opportunity for test prep people to write new books to sell us in addition to the money the ACT will take from us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mom2mthj said:

Where did you hear about college board changes?  I can’t seem to find that.

I think that was a joke (or at least I hope it was).    My D was annoyed when she realized that the subject test she had just taken was being dissected on reddit before the kids on the West Coast would have been in the exam rooms.   Reddit would blow up if the kids had an opportunity to redo answer questions.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Plum said:

It's definitely a relief for parents and students. It would have benefited my oldest. 

I do worry that: 

-scholarships will now require even higher scores because it will be easier to get closer to perfect scores

That's exactly what I see happening. It will be interesting to see if colleges act preemptively and change the required scores before even the first wave of students do this. It almost seems like they would have to, because a lot of schools will not be able to afford paying higher than anticipated scholarship money. 

3 hours ago, madteaparty said:

This one-section-at-a time option would be moot for students interested in schools that don’t superscore, right? 

The wording makes it seem like they might be sending the final scores, as opposed to the college getting all scores and seeing which sections were redone: "and will allow students to combine section scores for a "superscore" to send to colleges."

idk, lots of missing information, and it's a big change to be implementing so quickly. I think it's going to be a disaster. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I wonder how they will deal with the score skewing from taking a single section?  Test fatigue is very real. Only having to take a single section will most definitely alter scores.

For my BK, it would be a game changer. She has taken the ACT three times, twice with accommodations, once without. In all cases, her first test taken was the highest score, the second the next, and the last two were in the toilet. She just plain only had about an hour of concentration in her. 

 

For super high performing kids, it might make the difference between a 30+ and a 34+, but most schools which have scholarships for the 34+ want a single sitting, and all the highly competitive schools that have super high ACT averages superscore, and tend to have an affluent enough population that they are probably doing this anyway. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, dmmetler said:

For my BK, it would be a game changer. She has taken the ACT three times, twice with accommodations, once without. In all cases, her first test taken was the highest score, the second the next, and the last two were in the toilet. She just plain only had about an hour of concentration in her. 

 

For super high performing kids, it might make the difference between a 30+ and a 34+, but most schools which have scholarships for the 34+ want a single sitting, and all the highly competitive schools that have super high ACT averages superscore, and tend to have an affluent enough population that they are probably doing this anyway. 

 


Does your BK (no idea what that acronym stands for) have special testing, or just standard accommodations?

With  special testing, they can take the test over the course of two weeks.  That might help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


Does your BK (no idea what that acronym stands for) have special testing, or just standard accommodations?

With  special testing, they can take the test over the course of two weeks.  That might help.

BK is my bonus kid-not mine biologically, but I've been her primary advisor for the last few years as she has headed into adulthood, since her parents cannot supply that kind of support. She gets extra time and breaks, but not much else-honestly, I think the neuropsych eval didn’t even consider how much fatigue was able to be compensated for in a homeschool environment, so she didn’t request the special testing. At this point, it doesn’t matter-she will be going back to the CC in Jan, and if she decides to transfer to finish, her GPA is all that matters, and she gets much better supports there than she did from the ACT folks. (She had a stroke-type event about a year and a half ago, right at the end of her senior year, so the last school year was lost regaining skills and completing the classes she had been taking DE, and this fall has been spent on vocational planning taking into account some new limitations she now faces.  The CC has been very supportive and willing to revise her plan based on her new medical concerns). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I reading correctly that they will allow students to take the sections electronically at home? How will they prevent cheating?

 

ETA: I now see the text about testing centers.  Never mind. There was a comment that mentioned testing at home. I should have reexamined the article. 

 

 

Edited by cintinative

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, cintinative said:

Am I reading correctly that they will allow students to take the sections electronically at home? How will they prevent cheating?

 

 


I didn't read it that way.  I read that they can take it electronically at some kind of test center or school.

There are plenty of other standardized tests given that way.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


I didn't read it that way.  I read that they can take it electronically at some kind of test center or school.

There are plenty of other standardized tests given that way.  

Yes. That is the way the CLEP is given.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be happy if they just made themselves irrelevant.  I agree with the statements above that really differenting between the top test takers and adding more thinking and application skills rather than just speedily doing basic questions would show more about a student.

 

We played the game because we had to for the money but what a waste of time and money that could have been spent doing productive things. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...