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PeterPan

Don't judge me on this, but...

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Put a little milk in a double boiler, add cubes of velveeta, stir until melted. Stir in cooked pasta.

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I'm putting in serious research here. This is ridiculous. :biggrin:

No seriously, it's for ds' bday and I thought I'd go all the way... Can't get more cheesy and creamy than velveeta. And we have a bbq place here in town that I swear is using it. So I'm just figuring out how. It could be simple, like Danae is saying, or they could be doing something. It's kind of nicely creamy, supernaturally creamy, like only aliens landing could have made it happen. So velveeta or velveeta + bechamel and cheddar? I even read reviews saying to use cornstarch instead of flour. I've go a pound of the orange stuff, so I gotta make a plan and go for it. Hahaha

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If you want to do serious research see if your library has the book Modernist Cuisine at Home and read the section on hot emulsions.

The short version is, the oil and water in cheese separates when melted. Traditional Mac and cheese recipes use a starch to maintain the mixture, but that dilutes the flavor and has an inferior texture. Velveeta and American cheese are made by adding sodium phosphate to keep the fat and water molecules in the cheese from separating. But they’re also made with cheap bland cheese. You can create the same effect at home using sodium citrate and good cheese. Creamy cheese sauce, and even your own slices that melt like American but taste like whatever cheese you use.

Edited by Danae
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18 minutes ago, Danae said:

If you want to do serious research see if your library has the book Modernist Cuisine at Home and read the section on hot emulsions.

The short version is, the oil and water in cheese separates when melted. Traditional Mac and cheese recipes use a starch to maintain the mixture, but that dilutes the flavor and has an inferior texture. Velveeta and American cheese are made by adding sodium phosphate to keep the fat and water molecules in the cheese from separating. But they’re also made with cheap bland cheese. You can create the same effect at home using sodium citrate and good cheese. Creamy cheese sauce, and even your own slices that melt like American but taste like whatever cheese you use.

Yes, yes!! I found an article on it!!! https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/01/how-to-use-cornstarch-and-evaporated-milk-to-make-stable-emulsion-cheese-sauce.html  I didn't have sodium citrate lying around (I don't think?), so I ended up using cornstarch to stabilize the cheddar and doing the rest as Velveeta. I think it may actually be good. Didn't have to add salt, and it's in the oven. And I used evaporated milk for part, because it said that can help too. I think the sodium citrate would be even better, but this was with what I had. Have you tried it with the sodium citrate?

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I see you just posted that you're finished, but in case you want a quick mac and cheese for lunches...

You can cut Velveeta up and add it directly to boiled and drained pasta with a dab of milk. Keep the heat really low and stir. Serve from the stove top.

If you buy good American cheese, it's also very creamy (like Boar's Head or Land of Lakes from the deli). I don't find American cheese bland, but I am a super taster, so there's that. I rarely make the fancy kind, and we just consider this a different kind of mac and cheese, not inferior, just not fancy. My kids would eat it multiple times per week.

I don't do well with additives (in Velveeta) or as sodium citrate. They make me itch.

 

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3 minutes ago, kbutton said:

If you buy good American cheese, it's also very creamy (like Boar's Head or Land of Lakes from the deli)

I don't think I've ever bought american cheese. I don't know what the difference is between that and velveeta? I think I've heard of it so I get that it's at the deli counter. But beyond that, completely unknown. Which may make it the alien substance I was looking for, haha.

So for the b-day mac, I wanted to go all the way, something over the top. But yeah sometimes I have emergencies with kids coming over, picnics, etc. and need something straightforward. I will have to research this american cheese stuff... :biggrin:

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1 minute ago, PeterPan said:

I don't think I've ever bought american cheese. I don't know what the difference is between that and velveeta? I think I've heard of it so I get that it's at the deli counter. But beyond that, completely unknown. Which may make it the alien substance I was looking for, haha.

So for the b-day mac, I wanted to go all the way, something over the top. But yeah sometimes I have emergencies with kids coming over, picnics, etc. and need something straightforward. I will have to research this american cheese stuff... :biggrin:

What most people think of as American is from the dairy section and is gross, lol! Be generous with the cheese and don't let it get cold before serving. Use enough milk that it stays creamy.

It's super fast and easy to make on the stove--faster than the powdered stuff from a box (which is just fine--we like Annie's when we do the box, for reference). Basically, we like mac and cheese of all kinds.

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2 minutes ago, kbutton said:

Read the label and decide. I don't remember what we get having that many ingredients.

It will be a "try new things" day. :biggrin:

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I make a baked mac and cheese that is pretty darn good, if I do say so myself. It's usually part Velveeta, part cheddar, part something else (American or gruyere or Munster, whatever's on hand). It starts with a bechamel and finishes with buttered panko crumbs on top. Baked, then broiled just for a minute. It's delicious! Just ask my kids. 🤣

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5 minutes ago, Noreen Claire said:

I make a baked mac and cheese that is pretty darn good, if I do say so myself. It's usually part Velveeta, part cheddar, part something else (American or gruyere or Munster, whatever's on hand). It starts with a bechamel and finishes with buttered panko crumbs on top. Baked, then broiled just for a minute. It's delicious! Just ask my kids. 🤣

That’s pretty much my recipe.  I prefer the bread crumbs to be the ones with Italian seasoning. But that is basically it.....I try to have Colby as part of the cheese mix.  It is OK w/out velveeta but a soft kid type cheese really helps things, I found one that was just fine in England too.

 My mom threw in one can of evaporated milk and an egg or two......she owned a diner before I was born and her Mac and cheese was really popular,  as in people asked me about it when I was little.😉. The eggs don’t make it creamier but it does hold better I think with the eggs and it certainly has a prettier color.

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41 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

Yes, yes!! I found an article on it!!! https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/01/how-to-use-cornstarch-and-evaporated-milk-to-make-stable-emulsion-cheese-sauce.html  I didn't have sodium citrate lying around (I don't think?), so I ended up using cornstarch to stabilize the cheddar and doing the rest as Velveeta. I think it may actually be good. Didn't have to add salt, and it's in the oven. And I used evaporated milk for part, because it said that can help too. I think the sodium citrate would be even better, but this was with what I had. Have you tried it with the sodium citrate?

 

Yes. I keep a bag of sodium citrate around for making melty cheese. It is magic.

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I have a crockpot recipe that uses 3/4 cup cheddar 3/4 cup colby jack 3/4 cup swiss and 1/2 cup velveeta plus evap milk, salt, pepper, and 2 T butter.  

I hope your mac and cheese works out great!

Edited by cintinative
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3 minutes ago, cintinative said:

I have a crockpot recipe that uses 3/4 cup cheddar 3/4 cup colby jack 3/4 cup swiss and 1/2 cup velveeta plus evap milk, salt, pepper, and 2 T butter.  

I hope your mac and cheese works out great!

Ooo, that blend of cheeses sounds good! I'm eating what I made now, and it's not too bad. I baked it, and it absorbed a lot of the creaminess. Definitely worth trying again, lol.

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1 hour ago, PeterPan said:

I'm putting in serious research here. This is ridiculous. :biggrin:

No seriously, it's for ds' bday and I thought I'd go all the way... Can't get more cheesy and creamy than velveeta. And we have a bbq place here in town that I swear is using it. So I'm just figuring out how. It could be simple, like Danae is saying, or they could be doing something. It's kind of nicely creamy, supernaturally creamy, like only aliens landing could have made it happen. So velveeta or velveeta + bechamel and cheddar? I even read reviews saying to use cornstarch instead of flour. I've go a pound of the orange stuff, so I gotta make a plan and go for it. Hahaha

I do a béchamel and then add in cubes of Velveeta. And I won’t judge you, because, although I’m kind of a food snob in most respects, there is just nothing like mac and cheese made with Velveeta. Oh, and use the small shells because they are like little cups of deliciousness. 

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Do you have an instant pot? I often have made the instant pot mac and cheese. But basically it's just pasta, evaporated milk (or cream), cheese, butter, and a bit of mustard. 

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You can buy velvet a Mac and Cheese in a box, or at least you used to be able to. I haven’t looked for a while.

How do you not know American cheese.  Paired with bologna and some wonder bread it was a staple of my childhood.  

I will add this for your research.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.theonion.com/kraft-introduces-new-kraft-doubles-for-couples-1819569567/amp

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For baked Mac and cheese I do bechamel with Velveeta and extra sharp cheddar. I undercook the pasta and reserve about 1 1/2 c (per pound of pasta) of pasta water to add to the sauce. Really runny going in, but creamy coming out. 

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16 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

You can buy velvet a Mac and Cheese in a box, or at least you used to be able to. I haven’t looked for a while.

How do you not know American cheese.  Paired with bologna and some wonder bread it was a staple of my childhood.  

I will add this for your research.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.theonion.com/kraft-introduces-new-kraft-doubles-for-couples-1819569567/amp

Ok, I'm a little jaw drop on the s*x cheese, lol. 

So yeah, we did eat bologna growing up, but that's a good question what the cheese was! My mother had some things on her sin list (white bread, southern accents, not sure what else), so I was more likely to have tuna with alfalfa sprouts on homemade whole grain. That's why the Velveeta was a big splurge. :biggrin:

8 minutes ago, Lawana said:

For baked Mac and cheese I do bechamel with Velveeta and extra sharp cheddar. I undercook the pasta and reserve about 1 1/2 c (per pound of pasta) of pasta water to add to the sauce. Really runny going in, but creamy coming out. 

Ooo, that would solve a lot of problems! It kept slurping up liquid (because I undercooked the pasta), and adding milk just gave more protein to glump. So I think you're right some cooking water would take care of it. And that's a good tip to take it to downright runny. I was just shy of there.

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1 hour ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

You can buy velvet a Mac and Cheese in a box, or at least you used to be able to. I haven’t looked for a while.

 

Yes, you still can.  I have a box in my cupboard.  I rarely eat the stuff, but sometimes I get a roaring craving for it and I like to know it’s there. I don’t want to make a huge amount of mac and cheese from scratch and the boxed stuff gets me through my craving until the next time.  

I know what I’ll be eating for lunch tomorrow, after reading this thread.

1 hour ago, PeterPan said:

Ok, I'm a little jaw drop on the s*x cheese, lol. 

 

The s*x cheese article is from a satire website—it’s not real.  Did you not eat grilled cheese sandwiches with American Cheese?  They’re a little piece of heaven.

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11 minutes ago, Garga said:

Yes, you still can.  I have a box in my cupboard.  I rarely eat the stuff, but sometimes I get a roaring craving for it and I like to know it’s there. I don’t want to make a huge amount of mac and cheese from scratch and the boxed stuff gets me through my craving until the next time.  

I know what I’ll be eating for lunch tomorrow, after reading this thread.

The s*x cheese article is from a satire website—it’s not real.  Did you not eat grilled cheese sandwiches with American Cheese?  They’re a little piece of heaven.

Grilled cheese sandwiches are my other purpose for Velveeta. That and mac & cheese. Although I rarely eat either because of the whole darned lactose intolerance thing. But if I’m making the trade, it has to be Velveeta! 

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6 minutes ago, Quill said:

Grilled cheese sandwiches are my other purpose for Velveeta. That and mac & cheese. Although I rarely eat either because of the whole darned lactose intolerance thing. But if I’m making the trade, it has to be Velveeta! 

Totally agree, Velveeta grilled cheese are the best!

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I do the trick others are mentioning and add just a little bit of American to the mix to make it come out a little creamier. I usually do just a bit and a lot of cheddar and a bit of whatever else I have on hand. But you could do half Velveeta and half decent cheese so it has some flavor to it.

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For small batches, Velveeta comes in packages already smooth. You just squeeze it out of the pkg over hot noodles and stir. I use these, because we rarely have it and it's easy and mess free.

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