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lamolina

Unaccredited transcript with poor test scores?

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Hello everyone-

I am wondering what you would do in this situation. My daughter (currently a sophomore) takes some of her classes at an accredited homeschool hybrid and some at home. She does well in everything except math in which she has a learning disability. As of right now her transcript will be unaccredited I do have the option to go through a local accrediting group and then she would graduate with an accredited transcript. Normally I wouldn't be too concerned about this but with her math disability I expect her to have issues with either standardized test. I don't know if a "mommy transcript" with a possible low test score will cause her issues? 

The biggest cons for me with doing the accreditation are the large amounts of extra work, extra cost, inability to make a class honors, and they also are unable to call a class AP on the transcript even if it is taken by an organization that offers official AP classes.  

Would you accredit or take your chances!? 

Thanks!!

Edited by lamolina
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I wouldn't bother with accreditation. Does your DD have accommodations for standardized testing? If not, I would make that the top priority.

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No, I wouldn't. "Mommy" transcripts are your official transcripts. Accreditation is almost always totally unnecessary. Homeschool students get into selective schools and the vast majority of state schools (not to mention any community college) with them just fine. And the benefits of not doing it (money, time and hassle saved, plus more control) far outweigh what are nearly always nonexistent benefits.

The only tiny exceptions would be if you're aiming for a specific college that is known to not accept homeschool diplomas (and this is really a tiny number of schools, all in state as far as I know) or if your student is aiming to go abroad.

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No, she will not be aiming for selective schools and will not be going abroad. I am in the middle of requesting test accommodations for her with ACT and then will move to SAT if she needs to take it also.  She has an official diagnosis from a neuro psych so I hope that does it. 

Thanks for the encouragement, I just didn't want her to end up applying and have a decent/good GPA but a poor test score and have her transcript questioned. 

She will do some dual enrollment for her junior and senior years which I guess will help to confirm her outside the home abilities. 

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Totally agreeing with previous posters. The only other place that I've seen require an accredited diploma (other than those rare U.S. colleges and some international schools, as listed by Farrar), are some trade schools and cosmetology schools -- they frequently want either an accredited diploma or a GED.

Rather than paying for accreditation, I would spend the money on a math tutor who specializes in helping students with your DD's specific disability, and get a paper trail going now of official diagnosis in order to line up accommodations for testing as Corraleno says above. And that "paper trail" established in high school will also open doors to potential FREE helps in college, that would otherwise come at an out-of-pocket expense if you don't have an official diagnosis before high school graduation.

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46 minutes ago, lamolina said:

No, she will not be aiming for selective schools and will not be going abroad. I am in the middle of requesting test accommodations for her with ACT and then will move to SAT if she needs to take it also.  She has an official diagnosis from a neuro psych so I hope that does it. 

Thanks for the encouragement, I just didn't want her to end up applying and have a decent/good GPA but a poor test score and have her transcript questioned. 

She will do some dual enrollment for her junior and senior years which I guess will help to confirm her outside the home abilities. 

If she has a math disability, ACT is definitely the best choice, because math is only 25% of the composite score, compared to 50% of the SAT. Keep working on the math prep, but don't neglect test prep for other three sections, because test-taking strategies can make a BIG difference there, and you want to squeeze every possible point out of those sections if you know her math score will be low.

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