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Wahhhh! Math

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So I have Abeka math ready to start today.  I just started tearing out worksheets and the level 2 looks easy for my son.  Even until the end of the book.  I know he can do more.  I guess I must supplement.  I don't know if I should let him hang back a bit and let him cement the facts and let something be enjoyable and easy or if I should push.  I tend to push my kids in every subject so maybe I should let something be easy.  I don't know.  Maybe if he does 2 worksheets a day, then we can move on to level 3.  I don't feel we can skip straight to level 3 because he hasn't done multiplication yet.  I was planning to double up lessons for awhile to catch up from our late start anyway.  I hate to try Math Mammoth because it's late to continue experimenting with another curriculum.  We are nearly finished with BA 2A and I don't know that I'll have time to work in BA 2B.  I also am registered with a school and need to stick with one program and I also need to quit wasting money on materials that don't fit.

I'm just venting.

 

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I feel your pain. We’ve all been there. I say double up and skip as much as you can then move on.

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Have you tried CLE math? You can use their placement test to figure out exactly which workbook to start at and easily skip the first one because it's all review of the previous year. If you're trying to catch up, skip the quizzes which makes the workbooks only 16 days each. 9 workbooks x 16 days each = 144 days 😊

Edited by Servant4Christ

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Let him complete the book you have. There is nothing wrong with letting things cement and gel when they are little. Pushing forward too quickly can end up backfiring a few yrs in the future. If he finds it super easy let him work by time vs lesson. For example, my 4th grader has almost finished 5th grade math bc doing multiple lessons in a day only takes 30-45 mins. I don't push her. She is her own impetus which leads to longer term rewards and gains.

She will probably finish through Horizon's 6th grade this yr. I wouldn't want to do prealg with her next yr if she wasn't the one behind the progression.

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I have breathed a little after initial panic and the good, great thing about Abeka is that it has so much review so he won't forget methods.  For example, he isn't great at telling time and that is reviewed throughout.

The thing I hate about abeka is that it has seasonal themed lessons so I absolutely feel I'll have to double up for both kids so we are doing the lessons with pilgrims on the worksheets around Thanksgiving time.  Wr often do math on Saturdays and then I feel my son's math is definitely easy enough to do 2 worksheets a day.  My daughter may not like that level of intensity.  We'll see.  The seasonal lesson thing really bothers me.  I will feel so behind all the time.  I know it probably shouldn't bother me as much but it just will🙁

ETA:  crisis averted, I suppose... until the next one.  I just was getting out math and found the grade 5 math actually doesn't have the seasonal lessons so that is less of an issue.  My son will go through his lessons fast so his seasonal lessons should be on time or early.

Edited by parent

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My daughter just asked, "Why this math is so easy?  Is it because I've been doing such hard math?"

Ugh... but it's a lot of review these first couple lessons.

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All six of my kids used Abeka for K through 3 math.  (We switch to Saxon for 4th grade through high school.)

We school year round, so the seasons didn't usually match up.  We just didn't worry about it and kept going.

And all of the books are easy at the beginning because most kids have the summer off and tend to forget a lot.  When I taught in a brick & mortar school, the entire month of September was review.

I would either let your dc skip through some of the really easy lessons, or have them work through them and let it be a confidence builder.

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3 hours ago, Junie said:

All six of my kids used Abeka for K through 3 math.  (We switch to Saxon for 4th grade through high school.)

We school year round, so the seasons didn't usually match up.  We just didn't worry about it and kept going.

And all of the books are easy at the beginning because most kids have the summer off and tend to forget a lot.  When I taught in a brick & mortar school, the entire month of September was review.

I would either let your dc skip through some of the really easy lessons, or have them work through them and let it be a confidence builder.

Yes, good point.  I will skip a lot, I think.  I just have to keep track because I have to submit progress reports including the number of lessons completed. 

My son just flipped through the entire book saying, "This is so easy, I could do the whole book now."  It is discouraging to me that it's only single digit addition for awhile (he was just doing 3 digit addition and estimating in BA) but the other concepts like clocks and calendars are good for him. 

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43 minutes ago, parent said:

Yes, good point.  I will skip a lot, I think.  I just have to keep track because I have to submit progress reports including the number of lessons completed. 

My son just flipped through the entire book saying, "This is so easy, I could do the whole book now."  It is discouraging to me that it's only single digit addition for awhile (he was just doing 3 digit addition and estimating in BA) but the other concepts like clocks and calendars are good for him. 

Don't over think this.  If you have to submit a progress report, state _____ had already achieved mastery of skills covered in lessons x-y and progressed to lesson z.  Lessons z to bb were completed.

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1 hour ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

Don't over think this.  If you have to submit a progress report, state _____ had already achieved mastery of skills covered in lessons x-y and progressed to lesson z.  Lessons z to bb were completed.

Oh, I overthink everything and try to abide by all the rules.   I'm overly fastidious about some things, I suppose.

I've just had a really stressful week.  My husband was gone from Wednesday- Sunday and I had a workshop to do with 2 older kids on saturday, a violin lesson was moved to Monday so that day was less of a school day.  I haven't done any school with my littlest this week .  I just feel like I'm another week behind and this math thing is making me more nervous.  My son did 3 math lessons today very easily, so I will press ahead, and hopefully ground him well and then push right into book 3.  My goal is year round school anyway.  And I do need something more independent than BA.  At least Abeka is something with straightforward instructions that he can do on his own.

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My son has completed nearly 30 Abeka lessons, and my daughter has completed about 20 (with many review problems skipped, I just circle the ones I want her to review).  My son is loving it and asking for more, I suppose because he feels successful and confident that it is so easy.  The things he needs to solidify are things like calendar terms, length and capacity measurements.  He is slow to produce an answer when I ask what month is after May, for example.  I need to practice more skip counting with him to get him multiplying. 

My daughter seems to have lost some of her multiplications facts.  She thought 6x7 was 41.  Ugh.  So, she is reviewing her times tables.  She hasn't been doing much of them over the summer I guess.  Otherwise, it doesn't look like she will have anything new in Abeka until lesson 100.  Fraction review will be good for her.  I gave her a fraction review page about a month ago and she seemed to have forgotten how to cancel when multiplying and how to convert mixed numbers to improper fractions.  She got it again when I explained it, but certainly is a less solid skill for her.

They are both strongly resistant when I suggest returning to BA.  Today I gave one page to my son and he did it without issue.  Maybe the key is giving them one page instead of 5.  I feel at a loss.  I do believe spiral and review is important.  BUT, I do need them to be able to do something independently.  I do not want them to not make progress.  The reason we are homeschooling is to tailor the curriculum to each child.  I just do not know how to tailor it or challenge them while giving them an independent math program.

I with admit something crazy, crazy, insane that is going on this semester.  I already was doing too much last year and decided to cut back.  But I am unfortunately doing more.  All music lessons were supposed to be on the same day, but our violin teacher forgot to add my youngest as a new student and had her schedule set so he had to go on a different day.  My oldest aged into the next lego league so we have 2 lego meetings (different days) instead of just one.  My daughter started ballet after a long lapse (only one day a week).  She started orchestra.  She started in a craft club that she loves and it's something I would never do with her because I hate crafting.  So, we were going to do less, but we added 4 daytime events to our calendar.  We also are out 4 nights a week for sports, church and music class, and sport on Saturday.  Nights are the same as last year so not a big issue.  The problem is that I do not even have one full day that I stay home.  This means I need some independent things that a child can do during the other activities and math has generally been the easiest.  I also use math as independent work when I practice music with one child at a time (takes about 2 hrs of my day).

I feel like they are mathy kids.  My son got a 100 on nearly every test last year.  This year, both have gotten about 97 on all quizzes and tests, just making simple mistakes.  I want them challenged and growing, which Abeka does not seem like it will do, but they seemed to constantly ask me questions when working on BA, always interrupting my work with another child.  I do also read them LOF, but only about 2-3 chapters a week lately.  I just feel like Abeka is not enough.  I do not know what to do.  I will keep pushing through Abeka until I figure it out, but I really need to figure it out 😞

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There is a reason math books have lots of repetition. Most kids need it. Just bc we as adults can flip through and say nothing new does not immediately mean that it is dispensable.

fwiw, all of my kids are strong math students. My oldest is a chemE and another was a math /physics major. Those 2 used absolutely nothing other than Horizons math through the 6th grade text. (Horizons is similar to Abeka.) With my youngest 3 kids I added HOE and it was a good supplement for word problems. 

Fwiw, I don't believe BA or SM are necessary for a strong math foundation. Understanding what they are doing......that is vital. But, there is more than one way to accomplish that goal.

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ETA: and I would give up homeschoolin with the schedule you describe. No way I could function under that much outside commitment. If you are happy, great. If not, I would prioritize. Kids don't need to do everything now (or even ever......my younger kids will never be on a soccer team bc I left that mommy role yrs ago.)

Edited by 8FillTheHeart

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8 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

There is a reason math books have lots of repetition. Most kids need it. Just bc we as adults can flip through and say nothing new does not immediately mean that it is dispensable.

fwiw, all of my kids are strong math students. My oldest is a chemE and another was a math /physics major. Those 2 used absolutely nothing other than Horizons math through the 6th grade text. (Horizons is similar to Abeka.) With my youngest 3 kids I added HOE and it was a good supplement for word problems. 

Fwiw, I don't believe BA or SM are necessary for a strong math foundation. Understanding what they are doing......that is vital. But, there is more than one way to accomplish that goal.

Good point.  Actually I have a math minor and math heavy degree after using Abeka math at Christian schools through middle school then Saxon after that.  So, that is why I thought it was sufficient when I started them at K, but I think maybe they could do better if I challenge them more now.  And my son especially is old for his grade so I will definitely push him fast through level 2 to level 3.  I was just so discouraging looking through my daughter's grade 5 book and it looks so easy.  She is not as keen on math either though.  She finds it tedious.  I'm just full of indecision and self doubt on this.  I know in my eyes everything is easy.  TWTM does say that children who do Abeka "know math".  Ok, I'll relent a little again.

 

11 minutes ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

ETA: and I would give up homeschoolin with the schedule you describe. No way I could function under that much outside commitment. If you are happy, great. If not, I would prioritize. Kids don't need to do everything now (or even ever......my younger kids will never be on a soccer team bc I left that mommy role yrs ago.)

Yes, things just snowballed.  Some of these things are just 1.5 hr from leaving and returning home, actually, littlest's violin lesson is less than an hour, but still a hassle.

I think we will likely drop Lego first.  That is 2 days freed.  Then next semester we will likely change ballet studios and do an evening class at a closer location.  I really feel she needs to improve her posture and she's loving it.  We also only committed to one semester with orchestra.  Maybe next semester we can combine violin lessons.  I would be back to 3 full days at home!

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I don't think BA would work as our main curriculum, because I don't think that puzzles are necessarily the way kids pick up new concepts, and because my daughter wouldn't enjoy that kind of problem day in and day out. However, why not do a page of fun puzzles as a change of pace once a week or so? I do think having problems that don't have immediate answers is good for kids and builds resilience. Whether it's something worth doing every day really depends on your kids. 

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35 minutes ago, parent said:

I do need them to be able to do something independently.  I do not want them to not make progress.  The reason we are homeschooling is to tailor the curriculum to each child.  I just do not know how to tailor it or challenge them while giving them an independent math program.

My experience, with my kids, is that I can either challenge them *or* I can have them work independently - I can't do both at the same time.  If I want them to do it independently, it needs to be something they find straightforward and fairly easy.  If I want to challenge them, I need to be right there, guiding, encouraging, pushing as needed. 

When I reached the point where I *needed* the kids to do a substantial chunk of their work independently, because there simply was not enough time in the day for me to supervise everyone in everything, finding worthy-yet-doable independent work became a major focus.  As did prioritizing what I wanted to do with them.  And working out a rough schedule of who does what, when.  For each kid, I listed out what I did with them (teaching the 3Rs, basically) and listed out what they could do independently (3R assignments plus things like copywork and typing and independent reading), and then slotted it together.  I redo it every school year plus with any major curriculum change, and I post it on the fridge as a checklist, so the kids know *exactly* what independent work they are supposed to do.  I personally like to work with each kid in a block - I work with the oldest mid-morning to lunch, the middle right after lunch, and bookend the youngest, half first thing, half last thing - and it gives them each blocks to work independently. 

(FWIW, I don't expect much independent work out of my youngest, who is 2nd grade; in general I haven't asked for much independent work out of my kids prior to 3rd grade - just writing words, plus a touch of math, and independent reading if they are reading (only oldest was reading in 2nd).  Time-wise it was no problem with my oldest, required some finagling with my middle to fit her around her older sister, and with youngest has resulted in me doing less with him than I did with his sisters when they were his age, because he can't do more independently and there's just no time for me to do more with him.  I'm teaching a solid six hours every day as it is, and I need all of it.)

36 minutes ago, parent said:

I want them challenged and growing, which Abeka does not seem like it will do, but they seemed to constantly ask me questions when working on BA, always interrupting my work with another child.

I used to do both the SM wb and IP with my girls, but I ended up dropping IP - despite how much I liked it and thought it was a worthy challenge - because I needed them to do it independently (no time to consistently do it with them) and they simply. could. not. do it independently.  Either they asked constant questions or they just skipped everything hard (2/3 of the book, it seemed) and never went back to it.  As the kids got older and the youngest got added, I simply didn't have the time to devote to it anymore.  I was a bit sad about it - IP was *such* a good thing for oldest, and dropping it for her, and not being able to make it work at all for middle - I wished it could have been otherwise.  But not enough to give up the other things we were doing.

It really sounds to me like you might just have to choose between less-challenging math they can do independently, or more-challenging math you do together.  Or make the less-challenging independent math primary, and supplement as you can with more challenging math you do together.  Or drop some of the extra-curriculars, to free up more time to do more challenging math together.  There's only so much time in the day - if challenging them in math is a major goal, then it sounds like you'll need to drop other things to free up time for it. 

But fwiw, I did the opposite: stepped back some on challenging math to free up time for other things.  Math used to be our top focus - spent probably 60-90min on it every day - but it definitely pushed out other things.  For a time, I thought the trade was worth it - and I don't regret it - but I couldn't do it forever.  Eventually we needed to add in some of what was pushed out, and math could not longer be that much of a focus (it's still a fairly big one, though).  It sounds like music is taking up the lion's share of your attention now - and if that means that math needs to be independent, then it might mean that math can't be too challenging.

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You all are so encouraging.

Yes, music takes up so much time.  They are doing so well with it, but it does seem rather imbalanced.  We had a message at church recently about lives being full of clutter, not bad things, but just too much filler and not having time for good works.  That really hit home but it is hard to streamline everything.  I feel music is a good work.  They are starting to play in church, which is so rewarding for myself and for the kids and they love it because they receive so much positive feedback.  I am sorry that I do not have time to volunteer.  I feel my youngest is old enough that we could help at the local food pantry but I cannot fit it in anywhere and that would be more rewarding in the long term than lego league, I'm sure.  We are doing well with getting most of our work done during the day.  The standard subject that has suffered the most is my daughter's writing.  We didn't do it again today.  Must do tomorrow.  We have only done about 6-7 of the paragraphs in IEW (outlines, rough draft and final draft for each) in the month we have been home.  But the subject I never get to that is the ultimate good work is Bible.  I probably did 5 Bible lessons in all of last year, only one so far this year.  I just do not seem to start with it and never fit it in.  I may try to just substitute our lunch time literature read aloud with a  children's Bible.  I do feel that it is very wrong for me to consistently leave it out.  

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I think the questions you need to ask yourself are

1- do your days reflect the days you want to live (and your children to live)

2-can you maintain this lifestyle long-term in a happy, healthy manner, and 

3-15 yrs from now are you going to look back and say, yes, we prioritized the right choices.

Every family who homeschools has the unique opportunity to create the day that they value. The trap is that they have to create the day that the value. That blank slate means that without careful planning, the slate is filled with activities and the activities create the day vs the family forming the day. Does your day reflect the day you want your children living? Is it the "day" you would "enroll" them in?

Since you mention church, I will share our recent homily. The priest emphasized where your treasure is there your heart will be. Are you living for and having your children focus on what you can't take with you (living for the world and  pursuing worldly goods) or do you reflect/pray and live your life for things that don't mirror our society?

Those are the questions that we wrestle with and all have to find the answers for ourselves.

I will share my strong personal opinion that deep critical thinking/creative thinking does not come from a math book or from being taught. I think being constantly regulated/scheduled does more to dwarf critical thinking than modern education recognizes. Freedom to play, reflect, interact with nature/outdoor "stuff" in a completely unstructured way nurtures the mind to think in ways that adult interference/control restricts and "juveniles."  If you have ever read Fahrenheit 451..... Clarisse thinks independently and is nurtured through nature, family conversation, slow-paced time to think. Mildred conforms and is constantly fast-paced and "engaged."  Bradbury and Lewis both illustrate man's devolution into trousered apes.

We do control our children's days and it is an awesome responsibility.  At the end of the day when we stop and reflect on what we did and didn't do.....what is on each side of the scale and is it balanced or is one side outweighing the other.

Edited by 8FillTheHeart
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Last night, I was trying to think of something I could delegate to my husband, though I do not like to relinquish control of my school subjects.  It occurred to me that it would be a huge help and relieve my burden of guilt if he taught Bible.  Last night was the beginning and he will consistently read them a Bible story each night instead of whatever he normally reads them.  I don't know why I didn't think of this before.  I will continue to include a Bible verse in their copy work and memorization.  I also watched my next Andrew Pudewa IEW TWSS disc while folding laundry.  His perspective is so helpful to me.  He was discussing the Suzuki method applied to writing.  It occurred to me that I should be doing the same thing with math, repeating repertoire until it is effortless. 

2 hours ago, 8FillTheHeart said:

I think the questions you need to ask yourself are

1- do your days reflect the days you want to live (and your children to live)

2-can you maintain this lifestyle long-term in a happy, healthy manner, and 

3-15 yrs from now are you going to look back and say, yes, we prioritized the right choices.

Every family who homeschools has the unique opportunity to create the day that they value. The trap is that they have to create the day that the value. That blank slate means that without careful planning, the slate is filled with activities and the activities create the day vs the family forming the day. Does your day reflect the day you want your children living? Is it the "day" you would "enroll" them in?

Since you mention church, I will share our recent homily. The priest emphasized where your treasure is there your heart will be. Are you living for and having your children focus on what you can't take with you (living for the world and  pursuing worldly goods) or do you reflect/pray and live your life for things that don't mirror our society?

Those are the questions that we wrestle with and all have to find the answers for ourselves.

I will share my strong personal opinion that deep critical thinking/creative thinking does not come from a math book or from being taught. I think being constantly regulated/scheduled does more to dwarf critical thinking than modern education recognizes. Freedom to play, reflect, interact with nature/outdoor "stuff" in a completely unstructured way nurtures the mind to think in ways that adult interference/control restricts and "juveniles."  If you have ever read Fahrenheit 451..... Clarisse thinks independently and is nurtured through nature, family conversation, slow-paced time to think. Mildred conforms and is constantly fast-paced and "engaged."  Bradbury and Lewis both illustrate man's devolution into trousered apes.

We do control our children's days and it is an awesome responsibility.  At the end of the day when we stop and reflect on what we did and didn't do.....what is on each side of the scale and is it balanced or is one side outweighing the other.

 

Yes, I agree with you and it is a great reminder.  I do not want our current schedule to be long term.  I appreciate your post and am taking it to heart.  

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On 9/24/2019 at 7:18 PM, forty-two said:

I used to do both the SM wb and IP with my girls, but I ended up dropping IP - despite how much I liked it and thought it was a worthy challenge - because I needed them to do it independently (no time to consistently do it with them) and they simply. could. not. do it independently.  Either they asked constant questions or they just skipped everything hard (2/3 of the book, it seemed) and never went back to it.  As the kids got older and the youngest got added, I simply didn't have the time to devote to it anymore.  I was a bit sad about it - IP was *such* a good thing for oldest, and dropping it for her, and not being able to make it work at all for middle - I wished it could have been otherwise.  But not enough to give up the other things we were doing.

Let me say first that I know nothing about SM wb and IP. I'm guessing that SM is Singapore Math, wb is a workbook, and IP is something related of a challenging nature (Interesting Problems?, Impossible Propositions?, Intriguing Puzzles?).

Would it be possible for the child working independently, for example, at SM level 5 to also work independently at a lower level IP, for example, level 3?

Regards,

Kareni

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6 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Let me say first that I know nothing about SM wb and IP. I'm guessing that SM is Singapore Math, wb is a workbook, and IP is something related of a challenging nature (Interesting Problems?, Impossible Propositions?, Intriguing Puzzles?).

Would it be possible for the child working independently, for example, at SM level 5 to also work independently at a lower level IP, for example, level 3?

Regards,

Kareni

Good guesses :).  IP stands for Intensive Practice.  The answer to your question is yes, but if you run IP too far behind the wb, at some point it's more or less pointless wrt being an extra challenge.  I used to run IP about 6mo behind, and as difficulties mounted up it slid to more like a year, and that was still worth something.  But once you are hitting two+ years behind, idk if it's worth it so much.  At a certain point, the current wb stuff pretty well matches the complexity of the older IP stuff.  Not perfectly, but in many respects.  Middle dd did do a bit of IP about that far behind this year - she was amazed at how much easier it seemed - but it wasn't a stretching sort of assignment anymore.  Good for interesting review, but without the challenge aspect.  Although middle dd could maybe use some interesting, independent review, and as we have a few unused books, it might be worth trying.

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22 minutes ago, forty-two said:

Good guesses :).  IP stands for Intensive Practice.  

Ah, thank you! I probably did know that at one point.

23 minutes ago, forty-two said:

The answer to your question is yes, but if you run IP too far behind the wb, at some point it's more or less pointless wrt being an extra challenge.

That makes sense.

23 minutes ago, forty-two said:

Although middle dd could maybe use some interesting, independent review, and as we have a few unused books, it might be worth trying.

I'm definitely in favor of using something that's already been bought and paid for.

All the best!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/25/2019 at 4:49 AM, 8FillTheHeart said:

I think the questions you need to ask yourself are

1- do your days reflect the days you want to live (and your children to live)

2-can you maintain this lifestyle long-term in a happy, healthy manner, and 

3-15 yrs from now are you going to look back and say, yes, we prioritized the right choices.

Every family who homeschools has the unique opportunity to create the day that they value. The trap is that they have to create the day that the value. That blank slate means that without careful planning, the slate is filled with activities and the activities create the day vs the family forming the day. Does your day reflect the day you want your children living? Is it the "day" you would "enroll" them in?

Since you mention church, I will share our recent homily. The priest emphasized where your treasure is there your heart will be. Are you living for and having your children focus on what you can't take with you (living for the world and  pursuing worldly goods) or do you reflect/pray and live your life for things that don't mirror our society?

Those are the questions that we wrestle with and all have to find the answers for ourselves.

I will share my strong personal opinion that deep critical thinking/creative thinking does not come from a math book or from being taught. I think being constantly regulated/scheduled does more to dwarf critical thinking than modern education recognizes. Freedom to play, reflect, interact with nature/outdoor "stuff" in a completely unstructured way nurtures the mind to think in ways that adult interference/control restricts and "juveniles."  If you have ever read Fahrenheit 451..... Clarisse thinks independently and is nurtured through nature, family conversation, slow-paced time to think. Mildred conforms and is constantly fast-paced and "engaged."  Bradbury and Lewis both illustrate man's devolution into trousered apes.

We do control our children's days and it is an awesome responsibility.  At the end of the day when we stop and reflect on what we did and didn't do.....what is on each side of the scale and is it balanced or is one side outweighing the other.

WOW! Just WOW! This is so inspiring to me right now ❤️ thank you! 

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On 9/26/2019 at 1:14 AM, parent said:

 It occurred to me that I should be doing the same thing with math, repeating repertoire until it is effortless. 

 

That is a part of math, but problem solving is too. Have you considered breaking math into 2 parts, one that is independent and drill focused, and one that is together and problem solving focused.

We used IP and it was excellent for problem solving. In contrast to forty-two, we dropped the workbook and only did IP. Excellent problem solving, but only an unusual kid would do it completely independently.

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1 hour ago, lewelma said:

 

That is a part of math, but problem solving is too. Have you considered breaking math into 2 parts, one that is independent and drill focused, and one that is together and problem solving focused.

We used IP and it was excellent for problem solving. In contrast to forty-two, we dropped the workbook and only did IP. Excellent problem solving, but only an unusual kid would do it completely independently.

What is IP?

We are doing great now!  I'm in a much better place.  Maybe because I've been sick all week, I haven't worried about doing too much. My daughter is on lesson 30 and I think my son is at 38 in Abeka and I'm going to slow our pace.  From now on, my daughter will do 1 lesson per day but will probably also do a Saturday lesson so 6/wk.  My son will probably do at least 2/day.  He asks for more because I guess it feels easy and makes him confident, but I don't want him to do more than 3 per day.  I do review math drills and work a few problems of new concepts or anything they did wrong the day before.  I have given them an occasional page of BA and it was much better received.  I think multiple pages of BA is way too much for them so can't be our main program.  I do like the problem solving aspect.  Anyway, Abeka is just so much better because the bulk of their worksheet is done independently.   Also, I like the exams and also the daily speed drill quizzes.  BA doesn't have either.

ETA:  the kids also weren't keen on BA, in case I wasnt clear on that.   They are adamant that they don't want to return to it as main curriculum. 

Edited by parent

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