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Kareni

What one book have you so enjoyed that you'd like everyone to read, because you want them to share the pleasure?

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On 9/12/2019 at 9:26 AM, Matryoshka said:

So speaking of books I've loved that are less-known, I loved Together Tea by Marjan Kamali, but I know literally no one else who has read it.  It's a bit P&P-ish in that the mother is desperate to marry the daughter off, but the family is Iranian-American, it's set in modern times and partly in Iran, and the book is almost as much about the mother kind of finding herself again as her own person after motherhood (relatable) as about the daughter finding love - which she eventually does.  I don't usually even read books that have a romantic theme.  For some reason this book made me warm and happy and more people should read it!

This definitely sounds appealing, so I've just downloaded a sample. Thank you for the recommendation, Matryoshka.

On 9/12/2019 at 9:26 AM, Matryoshka said:

The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison - well, I know lots of WTM people who've read it, but none IRL...  

You're preaching to the converted here as I count The Goblin Emperor as a favorite. It only took me about four years to read it after my daughter recommended it! I am fortunate in that I can talk about it with two people as my husband also read it.

On 9/12/2019 at 10:27 AM, Matryoshka said:

A nonfiction one that hit me that way was Born a Crime by Trevor Noah.  So, so, so good.  But get it as an audio.  No, really.   The author narrates and makes it even a zillion times better.  I can't even imagine how reading a click language on the page would in any way compare to the author speaking it with feeling!  

I've heard many good things about this book, too. I may try to get a copy when my husband and I next take a long car trip as that's the only time I listen to audiobooks.

Regards,

Kareni

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23 minutes ago, Kareni said:

I tried The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency when it first came out in the US but then abandoned it. Do you favor one of his series over the others? He's certainly a popular author. I volunteer at the library and am constantly reshelving his books.

 

My favorites are the 44 Scotland Street books and the Isabel Dalhousie series. I didn't like the Ladies' Detective Agency at first either, until I really got into the others 🙂

 

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On 9/13/2019 at 1:00 PM, Chrysalis Academy said:

Oh man, that book was amazing, but it's not one I've ever been able to recommend - I'm still traumatized after having read it years and years ago. I'm not sure I can wish that on somebody else! I know a lot of people love it, though. Maybe I'd have more fortitude if I read it now. I think I read it soon after it was published, in my mid-20s, and I seriously feel scarred by it. I haven't been able to bring myself to re-read it as a grown-up.

 

I was thinking the exact same thing!  I have it on my shelf but haven't opened it again. 

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The Winternight Trilogy by Katherine Arden.  Based very deeply in Russian folklore.  The author's writing is so beautiful and poetic to me.  Worth getting the audio also for the pronounciation.   For reference, I love Lord of the Rings, but Game of Thrones was a *little* too much realism for me.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/bookseries/B071D3KKFX

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Going upthread, Kareni, I happened to love the newest Lady Trent book, Turning Darkness Into Light. It was terrific, and I could read a thousand more books just like it.

However, I have said this before and I will say it again - these books are not exactly action-packed. If you don't like them slow-moving, you're not going to like them. And if you couldn't get into the first one, the later ones will not be an improvement.

There are some books I love - Ann Leckie's newest, The Raven Tower, is another example - where every recommendation comes with the warning that "if this isn't the sort of book you like, you're not going to like it".

(Also, if The Raven Tower IS the sort of book you like you will LOVE it. I can't tell you anything about it without spoiling it. I can tell you one thing - if you don't like second person narration where the narrator keeps switching between the recent and the very distant past, you should just walk on by.)

Edited by Tanaqui
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Have I ever strongly recommended a book to someone and had them like it? I don't think so.

But I've had better luck with my own kids. Shusaku Endo, Silence; Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom; Melville's Moby Dick were all hits; and I just convinced Middle Girl to read Henry James's The American. Next I need to dig out Trollope's The Eustace Diamonds, which I think she'll love (she enjoyed Vanity Fair and Bel-Ami, so she's good with the anti-hero thing).

Anyway, if you liked two or more of the above books, maybe you'd like the others. Or the converse.

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16 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

There are some books I love - Ann Leckie's newest, The Raven Tower...

I just noticed this is a Kindle Daily Deal. It's $3.99 today (only, I'm guessing).

Regards,

Kareni

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Posting so I can come back and find this book sharing thread easily❤️ 

A title I've recommended to quite a few people, and I don't think has been mentioned yet, is already a TWTM favourite:  News of the World  by Paulette Jiles   (Most other titles I enjoy I'd only recommend to someone I think may appreciate it.)

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2 hours ago, Kareni said:

I had indeed not heard of the book, Pen, but you've intrigued me with your enthusiasm. 

I hadn't thought that seed companies would be likely places for good book recommendations!  I hope that you will get your desired sequel one day! Thanks for sharing, Pen, and for posting the excerpt.

ETA: Thanks also for your mention of The One-Straw Revolution: An Introduction to Natural Farming (New York Review Books Classics) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1590173139/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_dILEDbBM1ZZW9; it looks like a book my husband might enjoy.

Regards,

Kareni

 

After noting Violet Crown’s comment about others not liking books recommended—I wonder if sometimes too much enthusiasm for a book ruins it?  If someone else is just reading and enjoying then someone aware of that may pick it up and enjoy it too.  But too much rah, rah, and the poor book can’t live up to the expectations for it.  

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I’ll echo listening to Born A Crime on audiobook read by Trevor Noah. You will laugh out loud as well as be brought to tears by his delivery. The book is good but I cannot imagine reading it off the page hitting the same way as hearing it told with the emphases as the author intended. He has a great voice for storytelling, all the better here because he owns the stories told in this book. 

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15 minutes ago, stephanier.1765 said:

Since this thread began, I've read The Summer Book, 2 books in the The Linesman trilogy (still reading book 3) and I'm listening to The Goblin Emperor. A big thumbs up to them all!

YAY! I'm glad you enjoyed them all.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/29/2019 at 6:35 PM, Kareni said:

I read this when I was around twelve; it may be time for a reread! Thank you for sharing, Twigs.

You are definitely encouraged to stay, Angie!

You have definitely piqued my interest with your enthusiasm. I will download a sample and give it a look. Thanks for sharing your recommendation, Angie.

Regards,

Kareni

 

Thanks for the kind words. (I got that vibe. 👍)

Did you take a peek at the Spark sample yet? If so, what did you think? 

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On 9/12/2019 at 10:24 AM, Pen said:

 

Through the Eyes of a Stranger (Yaro Tales) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1441545654/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_lnLEDbEZ6VS06

 

I decided to play by the rules and cut my selection to this one.  Especially because it has a hopeful feeling for times when world or life is seeming hard.  

And probably most people will never have even heard of it.  

I am still hoping for a sequel.  

I’ve decided like some others here it could use a bit of excerpt or review.  I first learned of it, via a quote in a seed catalog.  No doubt the only fiction book I’ve ever found that way. 

 

 

 

Was the seed catalog Fedco? That's the only one I've ever seen with quotations. I got to hear Will Bonsall lecture on seed saving when his radical self-reliant gardening book came out.

Most of my recommended books I first learned about here on WTM

My Family and Other Animals by Gerald Durrell 

Uncle Tungsten by Oliver Sacks

I second this lovely one someone mentioned in a previous post:

The Summer Book by Tove Jansson

 

 

 

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On 9/12/2019 at 9:16 AM, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

Gregor the Overlander series by Suzanne Collins (author of Hunger Games).  These are fantastic, comparable to Harry Potter.

My daughter definitely enjoyed that series when she was younger.

On 9/12/2019 at 9:38 AM, fastweedpuller said:

I thought of 4 because they should be read as a group:  the Neapolitan novels by Elena Ferrante.  I could.not.wait for each new one to come out...and waited as long as I could to start the last, knowing it was the last.  Sigh.

I've heard excellent things about the Neapolitan novels; perhaps I should suggest the first to my book group. I hear you on that sigh when a good series ends.

On 9/12/2019 at 10:05 AM, BooksandBoys said:

I adore The Winter Sea by Susanna Kearsley. It’s gorgeous. Most of her books are (except the ones that aren’t). Her writing make me feel like I’m wrapped in warm silk.

Are you familiar with the Word Wenches site, @BooksandBoys? Susanna Kearsley is a regular poster there. Here's one of her recent columns ~ History In My Hand

On 9/12/2019 at 11:16 AM, Chrysalis Academy said:

Definitely The Goblin Emperor!! That book makes me so happy

Me, too! I've now read it a time or ten.

On 9/12/2019 at 11:16 AM, Chrysalis Academy said:

... to offer something original - Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett

I read a sample and will happily read on.

On 9/12/2019 at 11:29 AM, Matryoshka said:

for another warm-hearted SciFi, in spite of the title, the Murderbot series by Martha Wells.  They're each very short, and the four are really just one long story, and I liked them better and better as they went on.

I agree. My husband and daughter both liked the Murderbot books, too.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 11:35 AM, Stacia said:

...one I've recommended repeatedly & which has been enjoyed by a variety of readers to whom I've recommended it is The Plover by Brian Doyle.

(Hello there, Stacia!) I remember much positive discussion of The Plover. This strikes me as another good suggestion for my book group. I should start keeping a list!

On 9/12/2019 at 12:58 PM, mumto2 said:

I did try The Expanse but put it down quickly. (I seem to recall a violent scene.) I'm fairly certain my husband would enjoy it. I did like the first Department Q book but stalled in the second one due once again to violence. (Are you sensing a theme here?)

On 9/12/2019 at 12:58 PM, mumto2 said:

the Sebastian St. Cyr series https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/10822858-the-keeper-of-lost-causes?ac=1&from_search=true which are my ultimate comfort reads.

I did like the first in that series!

On 9/12/2019 at 12:58 PM, mumto2 said:

  @Kareni The Linesman is my planned last book for my Sci Fi 10 x 10 this year.  So I will be reading it!😉

I very much look forward to hearing your thoughts!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 11:16 AM, Chrysalis Academy said:

Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett

I just saw that this is currently priced at $1.99 for Amazon readers.

Here is the link.

Regards,

Kareni

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So many of my favorites have already been listed, but I'll add one that I've been recommending recently:  A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles.  I was glad to spend my time with that book and was sorry when it ended because I had no more to read....

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I have been busy reading or listening to many of this threads recommendations and thought I would update.  I still have a few more to read.

On 9/12/2019 at 2:16 PM, Chrysalis Academy said:

Definitely The Goblin Emperor!! That book makes me so happy.

But to offer something original - Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett

It's not that these are the greatest books ever written or anything. But they are books that made me feel really good and that I think anyone could enjoy, and that I'd like to share the pleasure of. I suggested them both to my dd and she loved them.

I loved The Goblin Emperor and ended up listening to it.  At one point I tried to read the book and didn’t enjoy it nearly as much in print.  It will be on my top ten list this year.......

Rabbit Cake was also an intriguing listen.  As the mom of a former sleep walker this book probably caused reaction that were not quite typical as I spent much of the book being incredibly grateful that we are beyond that stage.

On 9/12/2019 at 6:15 PM, BakersDozen said:

Funny as heck fiction: Captain Newman, M.D.

Anything by Patrick F. McManus (oh my goodness...I cry from laughing)

Religious fiction: That Printer of Udell's

I am so in love with Bo Tully........I am not done with the series yet but totally enjoying these books.   Thank you!

On 9/12/2019 at 9:47 PM, Momto6inIN said:

The most satisfying book I've read that no one else I know IRL has read is Til We Have Faces by CS Lewis. But I'm not sure it would have wide appeal.

The best book I've read that I think almost everybody I know would like is called Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks. It's about a boy on the spectrum and his imaginary friend and it's told from the perspective of the imaginary friend. It is laugh out loud funny, poignant, and has a good message.

I listened to Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend and really enjoyed it.  This book was so fascinating along with being quite funny.  Great book.  

I also finally read @Kareni recommendation of The Linesman.  Great Sci Fl......truly enjoyed it.

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Kids:  

Adults: 

i don’t read extremely deep books.  My mental health can’t take it.  Sorry. 
 

Aaaaannnddd I just saw that the thread said ONE book.   I spent time on these links and I’m not deleting, dang it! 🤣

 

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Still very belatedly trying to acknowledge all the replies in this thread:

On 9/12/2019 at 5:21 PM, lovelearnandlive said:

Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. I am still waiting for Susanna Clarke to write another book. I loved the plot, the wit, the mythology, and especially her lovely writing style. I recommend this book all the time but only one friend has read it so far!

I read and enjoyed this book some years ago.

Had you seen this?

 "Sixteen years after readers were introduced to the magical world of Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell, Susanna Clarke is to publish her second novel.

Out in September next year [2020], Clarke’s Piranesi will follow the story of its eponymous hero, who lives in the House, a building with “hundreds if not thousands of rooms and corridors, imprisoning an ocean. A watery labyrinth.” Occasionally, he sees his friend, The Other, who is doing scientific research into “A Great and Secret Knowledge”. Piranesi records his findings in his journal, but then messages begin to appear, and “a terrible truth unravels as evidence emerges of another person and perhaps even another world outside the House’s walls,” said Bloomsbury, which announced on Monday that it had acquired the novel in a two-book deal.... "

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 5:21 PM, Robin M said:

For non fiction, I often recommend Ray Bradbury's Zen in the Art of Writing or Alice LaPlante's Making of a Story

Those both do look good.

On 9/12/2019 at 5:21 PM, Robin M said:

Fiction wise, it's hard to narrow it down to just one book, much more one genre or author, but I'll try  I would recommend James Rollins medical thriller Judas Strain, #4 in his Sigma Force series which lead to reading the entire series. Oh. Lee Child's 61 hours (14th book in his Reacher series) was my introduction to Jack Reacher and I'm slowly working my way through the whole series, weirdly reading them out of order.  

And here you've named two series that I have yet to read. Thank you for the recommendations, Robin!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 5:29 PM, Ema said:

ALL the books by Thomas Eidson (not Edison!). Modern day author who write about frontier life. Wonderful writing, great characters and stories. 

This author is totally unknown to me, Ema, so thank you for the introduction. I see that one (maybe more?) of his books has been made into a movie.

On 9/12/2019 at 5:29 PM, Ema said:

Also, I think everyone should read “The Benedict Option” by Rod Dreher.

My husband liked that one.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 6:19 PM, alisoncooks said:

As far as fantasy, The Lumatere Chronicles trilogy (Melina Marchetta) just...speaks to me. Such a balance of despair and hope. But I don't recommend it often because it is so dark.

I've heard excellent things about this series. I read a sample and, yes, it did start out dark. Perhaps I'll give it another try sometime. Thank you for your suggestions, alisoncooks!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 6:52 PM, JenneinCA said:

My family and I have really enjoyed The Hive Mind books by Janet Edwards.  My daughter especially loved it.

https://www.amazon.com/Telepath-Hive-Mind-Book-1-ebook/dp/B01JDAJL8E/ref=sr_1_2?keywords=Hive+mind+Janet+Edwards&qid=1568339466&sr=8-2

Thanks for this suggestion, Jenne; this does sound good.

**

On 9/12/2019 at 7:18 PM, Familia said:

So many books...but these sit in my bedside always & are well worn. 

Fiction: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Stevenson

Nonfiction: Uniformity with Gods Will - 

I've read Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; but your second suggestion is unknown to me. Thanks for sharing, Familia.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 7:23 PM, Terabith said:

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

I've heard so many good things about this book.

On 9/12/2019 at 7:23 PM, Terabith said:

I could make a whole sci fi list

I'd love to see that list, Terabith!

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 8:08 PM, PrincessMommy said:

I loved Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell.  Loved it.  I recommended it far and wide and only a few tried and they didn't like it.  Sigh.  Loved that book.  I'm also waiting for her to write another one.

Did you see the article I listed above, PrincessMommy? The author has a new book coming out in September, 2020.

On 9/13/2019 at 12:01 PM, Penguin said:

I'll add one that has not been mentioned yet:

The Summer Book by Tove Jansson. It is one of the few books that I feel confident recommending to nearly everyone.

Aah, another book about which I've heard good things, Penguin. Thanks for contributing, Penguin.

On 9/13/2019 at 12:30 PM, Lady Marmalade said:

My contribution to this thread is Hotel On The Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford.  I read it this summer for the first time and have recommended it half a dozen times already.

I read this with my book group some years ago; I agree, Lady Marmalade, it's a wonderful book.

On 9/13/2019 at 1:00 PM, marbel said:

Station Eleven by Emily St John Mande

Another book about which I've heard good things, marbel. Thanks for chiming in.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/18/2019 at 11:24 PM, StellaM said:

Cold Comfort Farm is pretty funny, tho' humor is such an idiosyncratic thing.

Annie Dillard's The Writing Life, and Teaching a Stone to Talk.

Anything by Barbara Pym.

Thanks for all of your suggestions, StellaM. I'm adding them to my evergrowing list.

On 9/19/2019 at 2:15 PM, Innisfree said:

For those who liked Poisonwood Bible and Prodigal Summer: Barbara Kingsolver's most recent book, Unsheltered, is one of my favorites. It shares some themes with Station 11, as both are concerned with the fragility and beauty of our natural and social worlds.

Unaltered does sound good! Thank you for the recommendation, Innisfree.

Regards,

Kareni

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I’m not sure I’d say that everyone should read this for pleasure, but this year I read The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas, and consider it an important book. 

For anyone who hasn’t read any of Alan Bradley’s Flavia de Luce novels (starting with The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie), take a look. I’m sad there won’t be a new one this January, but I do hope there will eventually be another. One day I am going to start reading through them all again, and as I do, make a new reading list from all the classic literature quoted and referenced in the Flavia stories.   

My hold list at the library is full thanks to this thread!

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On 9/22/2019 at 2:19 PM, Liz CA said:

No way to keep this down to one book!

For funny / lighthearted yet still suspenseful with historical drama "He Shall Thunder in the Sky" by Peters.  One best reads the Peabody series from the beginning to get the whole story.

All of Jane Austen's books but especially these:

Sense & Sensibility

Pride & Prejudice

Dorothy L Sayers:

"Nine Tailors"

"Busman's Honeymoon"

I've read your Jane Austen recommendations but not yet the other books. Thank you for playing along, Liz!

Regards,

Kareni

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The Border Trilogy. Not a genre I normally read but I grabbed a used copy simply because of the author while thrifting. The whole time I'm reading it I'm thinking of who I could pass on such a beautiful book to.

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25 minutes ago, stephanier.1765 said:

The Border Trilogy. Not a genre I normally read but I grabbed a used copy simply because of the author while thrifting. The whole time I'm reading it I'm thinking of who I could pass on such a beautiful book to.

@stephanier.1765which one?  The one by Amanda Scott or Cormac McCarthy?

 

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I have three: Understood Betsy, by Dorothy Canfield; The Little White Horse, by Elizabeth Goudge; and the Chestry Oak, by Kate Seredy. I can't pick just one from among them. 🙂

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Okay, I'm going to add A Conspiracy of Truths and A Choir of Lies to my recs. It took me a while to get into them, but then I couldn't put them down and they stuck with me. I'm definitely following that author's work now.

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19 hours ago, Pickle Dust said:

The Martian by Andy Weir

I have read and reread The Martian quite a few times; it's a definite favorite!

Regards,

Kareni

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Fantastic thread idea!!

I can think of two offhand, though I wouldn't use the term pleasure to describe either.  Necessary would be a better word.

The first is Never Split the Difference.  It is written by a former FBI hostage negotiator.  It really helps you understand things from someone else's perspective and win negotiations in a non-manipulative way.  

Another is Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann.  It is about the founding of the FBI and the Osage murders.  This book is very close to my heart because I am related to people in the book and know some of the family stories personally.  It is very well done and accurate.  Even if you don't care about either topic, it is a must read for Oklahomans and historians.  It is part of United States history that isn't well known.  Martin Scorsese is filming the story for the movie and I pray that he does it justice.

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On 9/13/2019 at 2:01 PM, Terabith said:

I only recommend it in companion with its sequel, Children of God.  

 

We loved The Sparrow and reread on occasion. I was very glad to see a sequel and it, too, now gets reread (I actually have both on audible now to be able to listen to)

 

i do think Children of God gets relistened to a little more often.

 

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On 11/28/2019 at 1:11 PM, Seasider too said:

For anyone who hasn’t read any of Alan Bradley’s Flavia de Luce novels (starting with The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie), take a look. 

This.  IMHO, the first is the best, but the others are enjoyable, as well.  The vocabulary and literary references alone make this series worth reading. 

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4 hours ago, klmama said:

This.  IMHO, the first is the best, but the others are enjoyable, as well.  The vocabulary and literary references alone make this series worth reading. 

 

Yes! Either 2020 or 2021, I am going to reread the series and make a list of all the literary references, then read through *that* list!

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On 9/29/2019 at 6:31 PM, Violet Crown said:

Have I ever strongly recommended a book to someone and had them like it? I don't think so.

But I've had better luck with my own kids. Shusaku Endo, Silence; Faulkner, Absalom, Absalom; Melville's Moby Dick were all hits; and I just convinced Middle Girl to read Henry James's The American. Next I need to dig out Trollope's The Eustace Diamonds, which I think she'll love (she enjoyed Vanity Fair and Bel-Ami, so she's good with the anti-hero thing).

Anyway, if you liked two or more of the above books, maybe you'd like the others. Or the converse.

Absalom, Absalom and Moby Dick (and Henry James) in one post? 🥰 😍

When I first read Absalom, Absalom (back in the olden days) I kept having to restart if from the beginning because--although I was enjoying it--I wasn't fully following the plot. I thought my reading comprehension skill were starting to slip.

But after the third or forth time restarting  from the top, I just decided to press on.

After a while I felt as if the novel was like a merry-go-round, where on each revolution of the wheel pieces of the story started falling into place in a very non-linear fashion.

It blew my mind a little. But what an awesome book!

If this is what your children are reading, I present you with the "parent of the year decade" award.

Bill

 

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Spy Car said:

Absalom, Absalom and Moby Dick (and Henry James) in one post? 🥰 😍

When I first read Absalom, Absalom (back in the olden days) I kept having to restart if from the beginning because--although I was enjoying it--I wasn't fully following the plot. I thought my reading comprehension skill were starting to slip.

But after the third or forth time restarting  from the top, I just decided to press on.

After a while I felt as if the novel was like a merry-go-round, where on each revolution of the wheel pieces of the story started falling into place in a very non-linear fashion.

It blew my mind a little. But what an awesome book!

If this is what your children are reading, I present you with the "parent of the year decade" award.

I am always a bit humbled by what Violet Crown is reading...

I finally read Moby-Dick this year (rather, I listened to the William Hootkins narration), and I loooved it.  I was worried because I hated Billy Budd when I had to read it in high school.  I'm thinking of reading Bartleby the Scrivener this year.

But this discrepancy is helping my not give up on Faulkner quite yet - I also read my first Faulkner this year - As I Lay Dying - and yes, absolutely hated it.  Not the writing, the words and phrases were fine, but the characters and the plot.  I'm sorry, stupid people doing stupid things for stupid reasons.  Too.much.stupid.  I am still willing to try another, as it seems there is more to them?  Would Absalom, Absalom or The Sound and the Fury be a better choice for an improved impression?

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