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Kareni

What one book have you so enjoyed that you'd like everyone to read, because you want them to share the pleasure?

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So many books...but these sit in my bedside always & are well worn. 

Fiction: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr Hyde - Stevenson

Nonfiction: Uniformity with Gods Will - Liguori

 

 

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The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

Honorable mentions to The Physician by Noah Gordon, Pillars of the Earth, and the Genghis saga by Conn Iggulden.  

I could make a whole sci fi list.

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2 hours ago, lovelearnandlive said:

Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell. I am still waiting for Susanna Clarke to write another book. I loved the plot, the wit, the mythology, and especially her lovely writing style. I recommend this book all the time but only one friend has read it so far!

“It may be laid down as a general rule that if a man begins to sing, no one will take any notice of his song except his fellow human beings. This is true even if his song is surpassingly beautiful. Other men may be in raptures at his skill, but the rest of creation is, by and large, unmoved. Perhaps a cat or a dog may look at him; his horse, if it is an exceptionally intelligent beast, may pause in cropping the grass, but that is the extent of it. But when the fairy sang, the whole world listened to him. Stephen felt clouds pause in their passing; he felt sleeping hills shift and murmur; he felt cold mists dance. He understood for the first time that the world is not dumb at all, but merely waiting for someone to speak to it in a language it understands. In the fairy's song the earth recognized the names by which it called itself.”

Jonathan Strange is one of my all time favorites.......and I do recommend it.

2 hours ago, Pen said:

 

I also recommend books by Dorothy Gilman quite frequently, especially the Mrs Pollifax ones.

I love Mrs. Pollifax!  She is a relatively new find for me.

12 hours ago, Twigs said:

Jane Eyre.

A new friend recently asked what my all time favorite book was and Jane Eyre is what popped out.  I have loved that book since I was a teen.

21 hours ago, Farrar said:

I don't think any one book is for everyone and when I recommend books, I tend to try to be specific to the person.

That said, one book I generally like to share because I wish more people would read it (and it's not like it's unknown - it did very well and many people have, just not as many as I think would like it) is A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth.

It's an incredibly thick saga about a set of interconnected Indian families in the 1950's. Lata, the central character, is ready to marry and three prospects present. One is a hard working shoemaker. Another is a wealthy poet. Another is a super hot boy she happens to meet at her college who (gasp) turns out to be Muslim. It's a really quick read, despite the length. There's a lot about Indian politics of the time. It's set in a fictional town with a whole fictional set of political figures. The families all cross religions and worlds. While the whole story centers around Lata and her "suitable boy," another character, a sort of layabout named Maan, also figures very prominently.

It's being turned into a BBC mini-series soonish. Vikram Seth was supposed to write a sequel that was supposed to come out a couple of years ago, but there hasn't been much about it. I hope it still happens. It was going to be called A Suitable Girl.

I just put a hold on A Suitable Boy.....it is almost 1500 pages and I don’t think it is on Kindle.  I hope I will be able to hold it to read it as it sounds wonderful.  Thick books bother my hands.

9 hours ago, Matryoshka said:

So speaking of books I've loved that are less-known, I loved Together Tea by Marjan Kamali, but I know literally no one else who has read it.  It's a bit P&P-ish in that the mother is desperate to marry the daughter off, but the family is Iranian-American, it's set in modern times and partly in Iran, and the book is almost as much about the mother kind of finding herself again as her own person after motherhood (relatable) as about the daughter finding love - which she eventually does.  I don't usually even read books that have a romantic theme.  For some reason this book made me warm and happy and more people should read it!

The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison - well, I know lots of WTM people who've read it, but none IRL...  

I just remembered to put a hold on the book.....one of my planned fall reads.

8 hours ago, Chrysalis Academy said:

Definitely The Goblin Emperor!! That book makes me so happy.

But to offer something original - Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett

It's not that these are the greatest books ever written or anything. But they are books that made me feel really good and that I think anyone could enjoy, and that I'd like to share the pleasure of. I suggested them both to my dd and she loved them.

Audio or print for Rabbit Cake?  

4 hours ago, BakersDozen said:

Funny as heck fiction: Captain Newman, M.D.

Anything by Patrick F. McManus (oh my goodness...I cry from laughing)

Religious fiction: That Printer of Udell's

I just put The Bright Way on hold.

37 minutes ago, Momto6inIN said:

The most satisfying book I've read that no one else I know IRL has read is Til We Have Faces by CS Lewis. But I'm not sure it would have wide appeal.

The best book I've read that I think almost everybody I know would like is called Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks. It's about a boy on the spectrum and his imaginary friend and it's told from the perspective of the imaginary friend. It is laugh out loud funny, poignant, and has a good message.

Ditto, for Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend, Just put it on hold!

@Kareni The Linesman is my planned last book for my Sci Fi 10 x 10 this year.  So I will be reading it!😉

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Audio version of Linesman? Usually I prefer to listen which allows me to also do things like wash dishes.  But the audible audio sample didn’t seem as interesting as the kindle sample. 

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23 minutes ago, mumto2 said:

Audio or print for Rabbit Cake?  

Can't speak for Rose, but I listened to the audio for Rabbit Cake, and it was very good!  The narrator was great.

Goblin Emperor OTOH (not that you asked...) I'd say print.  There's a lot of Goblin/Elven language and honorifics that go by in the book that are a bit confusing, and the print version has an oh-so-helpful glossary at the end.  I'm a big audiobook fan, but that's one where I'd say stick to print...

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@lovelearnandlive - I loved Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell.  Loved it.  I recommended it far and wide and only a few tried and they didn't like it.  Sigh.  Loved that book.  I'm also waiting for her to write another one.

@mumto2  I also love Mrs. Pollifax.  I want to be her when I'm old.

 

I cannot limit myself to just one all-reaching book.  So I'm happily enjoying other people's suggestions.  🙂 

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10 hours ago, mumto2 said:

Audio or print for Rabbit Cake?  

I listened to it, and I think I remember that the reader was especially good, I'm sure this added to my enjoyment. Dd read the print book and loved it too, so I think this one works either way!

And for The Goblin Emperor - I actually listened to it first, the immediately turned around and read it. I read it a second time about a year later. I'm so glad I listened to it - there is unfamiliar vocabulary and having the "sound" of the language in my head made reading it on my own more pleasurable. I don't think I would have pronounced all the Elven place-names and honorifics "correctly" if I were just reading it - having heard it once was very helpful. I also liked the narrator very much and I think he got Maia's voice (internal and external) just right. But reading it is great too, because as Erin says the glossary is helpful. One funny effect of listening first then reading - I was surprised to learn that the protagonist's name was Maia, I had heard it as Meyer. LOL!

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11 minutes ago, Chrysalis Academy said:

I listened to it, and I think I remember that the reader was especially good, I'm sure this added to my enjoyment. Dd read the print book and loved it too, so I think this one works either way!

And for The Goblin Emperor - I actually listened to it first, the immediately turned around and read it. I read it a second time about a year later. I'm so glad I listened to it - there is unfamiliar vocabulary and having the "sound" of the language in my head made reading it on my own more pleasurable. I don't think I would have pronounced all the Elven place-names and honorifics "correctly" if I were just reading it - having heard it once was very helpful. I also liked the narrator very much and I think he got Maia's voice (internal and external) just right. But reading it is great too, because as Erin says the glossary is helpful. One funny effect of listening first then reading - I was surprised to learn that the protagonist's name was Maia, I had heard it as Meyer. LOL!

LOL.  I'm thinking of rereading The Goblin Emperor next year - since I've already read the print, and you say the audio is very good, maybe I'll give it a go as an audio this time!

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Gosh, now my kindle and library waiting lists are full. And I finally just caved and bought The Goblin Emperor since it's been recommended so much (here and other threads) and my library doesn't have it!

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2 hours ago, Chrysalis Academy said:

I listened to it, and I think I remember that the reader was especially good, I'm sure this added to my enjoyment. Dd read the print book and loved it too, so I think this one works either way!

And for The Goblin Emperor - I actually listened to it first, the immediately turned around and read it. I read it a second time about a year later. I'm so glad I listened to it - there is unfamiliar vocabulary and having the "sound" of the language in my head made reading it on my own more pleasurable. I don't think I would have pronounced all the Elven place-names and honorifics "correctly" if I were just reading it - having heard it once was very helpful. I also liked the narrator very much and I think he got Maia's voice (internal and external) just right. But reading it is great too, because as Erin says the glossary is helpful. One funny effect of listening first then reading - I was surprised to learn that the protagonist's name was Maia, I had heard it as Meyer. LOL!

The audio for Rabbit Cake is now on hold.  Thank you!

My plan for The Goblin Emperor is to attempt the audio (which is not popular at my library, so almost always available) with the print version in the house.  Trying to get the best of both worlds without having to hold the thick book which definitely would be an issue but for using a glossary is much preferred by me.    I had the paper checked out last spring and my Dd grabbed it out of the pile and loved it so much.  When she was done someone else had a hold on it........at that point audio may not have been a choice.

 I have to admit I am probably better off listening to the pronunciations as opposed to letting my brain make them up,  my chances of long term audio enjoyment is just greater.  I have recently started rereading (listening) whenever possible to many of the fantasy type series I have enjoyed while I sew, they make a great background and headphones mean I can use the machine too.

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16 hours ago, Terabith said:

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

Oh man, that book was amazing, but it's not one I've ever been able to recommend - I'm still traumatized after having read it years and years ago. I'm not sure I can wish that on somebody else! I know a lot of people love it, though. Maybe I'd have more fortitude if I read it now. I think I read it soon after it was published, in my mid-20s, and I seriously feel scarred by it. I haven't been able to bring myself to re-read it as a grown-up.

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I'll add one that has not been mentioned yet:

The Summer Book by Tove Jansson. It is one of the few books that I feel confident recommending to nearly everyone.

Fun thread, Kareni!

Some of my other favorites that have already been mentioned include Jonathan Strange and Dr. Norrell, The Goblin Emperor, Deathless, The Ferrante quartet, and All Creatures Great and Small

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1 minute ago, Chrysalis Academy said:

Oh man, that book was amazing, but it's not one I've ever been able to recommend - I'm still traumatized after having read it years and years ago. I'm not sure I can wish that on somebody else! I know a lot of people love it, though. Maybe I'd have more fortitude if I read it now. I think I read it soon after it was published, in my mid-20s, and I seriously feel scarred by it. I haven't been able to bring myself to re-read it as a grown-up.

I only recommend it in companion with its sequel, Children of God.  

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On 9/12/2019 at 12:02 AM, Farrar said:

I don't think any one book is for everyone and when I recommend books, I tend to try to be specific to the person.

That said, one book I generally like to share because I wish more people would read it (and it's not like it's unknown - it did very well and many people have, just not as many as I think would like it) is A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth.

It's an incredibly thick saga about a set of interconnected Indian families in the 1950's. Lata, the central character, is ready to marry and three prospects present. One is a hard working shoemaker. Another is a wealthy poet. Another is a super hot boy she happens to meet at her college who (gasp) turns out to be Muslim. It's a really quick read, despite the length. There's a lot about Indian politics of the time. It's set in a fictional town with a whole fictional set of political figures. The families all cross religions and worlds. While the whole story centers around Lata and her "suitable boy," another character, a sort of layabout named Maan, also figures very prominently.

It's being turned into a BBC mini-series soonish. Vikram Seth was supposed to write a sequel that was supposed to come out a couple of years ago, but there hasn't been much about it. I hope it still happens. It was going to be called A Suitable Girl.

Yes!

This book was Amazing.  I would read a bit, and then have to set it down and think about what I had just read.  The best way I can describe the book was that it was rich.  It was like eating a decadent dessert and needing to pause to savor the richness before returning for another bite.  I laughed, I cried, and I really felt like I was a part of that world for a time.  When I turned the last page I couldn't decide whether to cry because I was sad it was over, or stand up and give the book a standing ovation.  Truly a wonderful book.

 

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16 hours ago, Terabith said:

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

Honorable mentions to The Physician by Noah Gordon, Pillars of the Earth, and the Genghis saga by Conn Iggulden.  

I could make a whole sci fi list.

 

20 minutes ago, Terabith said:

I only recommend it in companion with its sequel, Children of God.  

Agree with @Terabith!  By itself, when I finished The Sparrow, I definitely felt traumatized.  Getting the cracks to the story filled in by Children of God totally changed The Sparrow into a much better book.

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3 minutes ago, Lady Marmalade said:

 

Agree with @Terabith!  By itself, when I finished The Sparrow, I definitely felt traumatized.  Getting the cracks to the story filled in by Children of God totally changed The Sparrow into a much better book.

I'll agree too.  I did love The Sparrow by itself, but the second book is really the second half of the same story, and has a much more satisfying resolution than what is effectively ending in the middle.

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My contribution to this thread is Hotel On The Corner of Bitter and Sweet by Jamie Ford.  I read it this summer for the first time and have recommended it half a dozen times already.   It's set in the WWII era, but not where novels of that time are usually set.  Instead we're taken to the Seattle area and the Japanese-Americans during that time.  Told through the eyes of a twelve year old boy named Henry who befriends a Japanese-American girl, the book showed me a piece of history that I'd admittedly not given much thought to before.  Occasionally we'd get a chapter about Henry as an old man many years later, and by the end of the book these two storylines came together in such a beautiful way. 

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Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel.

Looking forward to going back through the thread and finding some new books!

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42 minutes ago, Matryoshka said:

I'll agree too.  I did love The Sparrow by itself, but the second book is really the second half of the same story, and has a much more satisfying resolution than what is effectively ending in the middle.

It had redemption.

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On 9/11/2019 at 8:56 PM, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

I think the book I've been most evangelical about in recent memory has to be Can't Hurt Me by David Goggins and that is recent. But wow, that was a heck of a book

I read an excerpt from the book. Whoa, he certainly faced some serious challenges.

On 9/11/2019 at 8:56 PM, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

I feel like beloved books are such an intimate thing almost....... I couldn't stand the rejection if someone hated my most beloved! 

I hear you, Æthelthryth! I have a similar fear when recommending a restaurant. What if the food or service is bad the night my friends go....

On 9/11/2019 at 8:56 PM, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

I think my all time favorite book at this point of my life is Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel

I've heard excellent things about this book. Maybe one day....

On 9/11/2019 at 8:32 PM, moonflower said:

For me, it's the Tombs of Atuan

Ooh, I've read this one! Thanks for sharing, moonflower.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/11/2019 at 8:57 PM, MercyA said:

All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot

I remember reading and enjoying this years ago. Thanks for sharing, MercyA.

On 9/11/2019 at 9:19 PM, moonflower said:

... I reread the Little House books every time another kids comes of age to read them, so every 2-3 years.  ... I think part of that is that they were such a part of my childhood; my mom read them to me starting at about 4 and I've always had a set on hand.   They are the ultimate comfort read, even as an adult

It's wonderful that you have three generations of your family enjoying the same book. In my family, the book that my mother, my daughter, and I all share/d is 

The Complete Little World of Don Camillo by Giovanni Guareschi

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/11/2019 at 10:02 PM, Farrar said:

I don't think any one book is for everyone and when I recommend books, I tend to try to be specific to the person.

I understand entirely, and I generally do the same thing...except, rather obviously, in this thread!

On 9/11/2019 at 10:02 PM, Farrar said:

That said, one book I generally like to share because I wish more people would read it (and it's not like it's unknown - it did very well and many people have, just not as many as I think would like it) is A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth...

I've known of this book, but you certainly have convinced me that I should read it, Farrar. I'm adding it to my ever-growing wishlist.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/11/2019 at 10:11 PM, Tanaqui said:

Back on topic, I've read Linesman, but my mother was really sick that week and I barely took any of it in. I'm going to have to re-read it at some point.

Reading while under stress would likely have me remembering little, too. I hope that you'll enjoy an eventual Linesman reread.

On 9/11/2019 at 10:11 PM, Tanaqui said:

As for books I enjoy so much that I want everybody to read them, I stand staunchly by Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer. I love that book without reservation.

That sounds like a lot of fun, so I've downloaded a sample.

On 9/11/2019 at 10:11 PM, Tanaqui said:

if we're talking books for adults, I really really liked the Lady Trent series. Not fast paced at all, but I could read them over and over again

I recently read the first book in that series; it was actually my book group suggestion. Did you know that the author has a new book out featuring Lady Trent 's granddaughter?

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/11/2019 at 11:41 PM, LMD said:

Mine is Deathless by Valente. Love that book, beautiful and brutal

And I've just downloaded yet another sample! Thanks for sharing your recommendation, LMD.

On 9/12/2019 at 12:57 AM, Rosie_0801 said:

I think everyone should read the Secret Garden. Or, even better, have it read to them by someone who can do the Yorkshire properly.

Does the movie count?! I fear there are few readers local to me with Yorkshire accents. Thanks for sharing, Rosie.

Regards,

Kareni

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51 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Does the movie count?! I fear there are few readers local to me with Yorkshire accents. Thanks for sharing, Rosie.

 

No! The movie sucked! Or the one I've seen sucked anyway.

Butchered accents are a dreadful thing. You lot would have throttled me had you heard my poor attempts at Aunt Polly when I was reading 'Pollyanna' to dd, back in the day. Shameful stuff, but it can't be read in an Australian accent.

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On 9/14/2019 at 5:01 AM, Penguin said:

I'll add one that has not been mentioned yet:

The Summer Book by Tove Jansson. It is one of the few books that I feel confident recommending to nearly everyone.

Fun thread, Kareni!

Some of my other favorites that have already been mentioned include Jonathan Strange and Dr. Norrell, The Goblin Emperor, Deathless, The Ferrante quartet, and All Creatures Great and Small

 

Ditto and ditto 🙂

 

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Cold Comfort Farm is pretty funny, tho' humor is such an idiosyncratic thing.

Annie Dillard's The Writing Life, and Teaching a Stone to Talk.

Anything by Barbara Pym.

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On 9/14/2019 at 6:00 AM, marbel said:

Station Eleven by Emily St John Mandel.

Looking forward to going back through the thread and finding some new books!

 

I loved this too. 

 

 

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On 9/13/2019 at 12:27 PM, Pen said:

Audio version of Linesman? Usually I prefer to listen which allows me to also do things like wash dishes.  But the audible audio sample didn’t seem as interesting as the kindle sample. 

Well, I'm about 6 chapters in on audible and enjoying it a lot.

I also ordered unusual chickens, I suspect my boys will love it. 

You guys are dangerous, keep 'em coming!

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1 hour ago, LMD said:

Ooh station 11 sounds amazing!

I'm about halfway through it right now and I really like it. I can't wait to find out what happens.

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On 9/12/2019 at 1:45 AM, linders said:

 And what seemed like a simple question is tough - so many people in my life are very "specific" readers - "just non-fiction" or "no science fiction" or "not historical fiction!" Or sadly, one of my closest friends, who doesn't enjoy reading, at all.

I hear you. There are so many good books in other genres that I don't imagine the readers will be too deprived if they miss out on Linesman.  That non-reader though.... My life would be so much poorer, I think, if I didn't read.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 2:06 AM, J-rap said:

I'm intrigued by Linesman ~ I don't normally read sci-fi, but now suddenly I think I might like to!

If you do, I hope you'll enjoy it!

On 9/12/2019 at 2:06 AM, J-rap said:

Sorry I listed four instead of just one!

On 9/12/2019 at 2:06 AM, J-rap said:

David Copperfield, Poisonwood Bible, and Cry, The Beloved Country.

  ... the entire Betsy-Tacy series.

It's tough to choose!  Thanks for sharing your choices, J-rap.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 1:11 AM, Tanaqui said:

 

As for books I enjoy so much that I want everybody to read them, I stand staunchly by Unusual Chickens for the Exceptional Poultry Farmer. I love that book without reservation. I wish it had been around when I was a kid. (Heck, most of the books I spend my time rec'ing - and I've got two threads I have to reply to this weekend! - are books I wish I'd had when I was a kid.

I got that for my daughter thanks to your recommendation on a thread, and she and I have loved it and the sequel.

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12 hours ago, LMD said:

Ooh station 11 sounds amazing!

Station 11 was one of those books that gripped my imagination for weeks after I finished it. I still find myself drifting back to it, months later.

For those who liked Poisonwood Bible and Prodigal Summer: Barbara Kingsolver's most recent book, Unsheltered, is one of my favorites. It shares some themes with Station 11, as both are concerned with the fragility and beauty of our natural and social worlds.

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On 9/12/2019 at 6:47 PM, Momto6inIN said:

The best book I've read that I think almost everybody I know would like is called Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks. It's about a boy on the spectrum and his imaginary friend and it's told from the perspective of the imaginary friend. It is laugh out loud funny, poignant, and has a good message.

I've been trying to address all the replies to this thread in order; however, I'm jumping ahead now. 

Yesterday, I got a library copy of  Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend: A Novel by Matthew Dicks due to your recommendation, @Momto6inIN. I spent much of the day reading it and finished it last night. I quite liked it and had several conversations about it with my husband. It was both entertaining and thought provoking. Thanks for mentioning the book!

Regards,

Kareni

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3 hours ago, Kareni said:

I've been trying to address all the replies to this thread in order; however, I'm jumping ahead now. 

Yesterday, I got a library copy of  Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend: A Novel by Matthew Dicks due to your recommendation, @Momto6inIN. I spent much of the day reading it and finished it last night. I quite liked it and had several conversations about it with my husband. It was both entertaining and thought provoking. Thanks for mentioning the book!

Regards,

Kareni

So glad you liked it!

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No way to keep this down to one book!

For funny / lighthearted yet still suspenseful with historical drama "He Shall Thunder in the Sky" by Peters.  One best reads the Peabody series from the beginning to get the whole story.

All of Jane Austen's books but especially these:

Sense & Sensibility

Pride & Prejudice

Dorothy L Sayers:

"Nine Tailors"

"Busman's Honeymoon"

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On 9/12/2019 at 1:02 AM, Farrar said:

I don't think any one book is for everyone and when I recommend books, I tend to try to be specific to the person.

That said, one book I generally like to share because I wish more people would read it (and it's not like it's unknown - it did very well and many people have, just not as many as I think would like it) is A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth.

It's an incredibly thick saga about a set of interconnected Indian families in the 1950's. Lata, the central character, is ready to marry and three prospects present. One is a hard working shoemaker. Another is a wealthy poet. Another is a super hot boy she happens to meet at her college who (gasp) turns out to be Muslim. It's a really quick read, despite the length. 

I put a hold on this at the library and when I picked it up I was shocked. I evidently missed where you said it was an incredibly thick saga, but I did recall the ‘it’s a really quick read’.  I’m enjoying it, so thanks for the recommendation! but I’m sure I won’t get through it without needing to renew it. 

The library my sister uses is closing for renovation and if you have a book checked out when they close, you can keep it the whole two months they’re not open. She’s going to request A Suitable Boy!

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39 minutes ago, Annie G said:

I put a hold on this at the library and when I picked it up I was shocked. I evidently missed where you said it was an incredibly thick saga, but I did recall the ‘it’s a really quick read’.  I’m enjoying it, so thanks for the recommendation! but I’m sure I won’t get through it without needing to renew it. 

The library my sister uses is closing for renovation and if you have a book checked out when they close, you can keep it the whole two months they’re not open. She’s going to request A Suitable Boy!

Ha. Yeah, it’s the second longest book I’ve ever read. If ever a book should be an ebook! But there’s no ebook edition. I first bought it at a used foreign book stall in Malaysia to read on a train and it kept me company for quite a long time in Thailand.

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On 9/12/2019 at 4:10 AM, Carol in Cal. said:

Hillbilly Elegy

Uncommon Ground

The Overstory

Kids:

The Diamond In The Window

Number the Stars

In Place of Katya 

Thanks for your suggestions, Carol. Of your first three, I've heard excellent reviews of the first and third. Who is the author of Uncommon Ground? [I'm guessing it's not this book which I would like to read.]

Of the three books for children, I know the first two but am unfamiliar with In Place of Katya. Who is the author?

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 4:20 AM, HomeAgain said:

My "comfort book" would have to be one of two: The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio, or A Tree Grows In Brooklyn. 

I read TPWoDO years ago and enjoyed it. I've never read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn though I've been tempted by all the good reports I've heard. So many good books.... Thanks for chiming in, HomeAgain.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 5:38 AM, Monica_in_Switzerland said:

But when I'm not in my epic phase, the books I tend to recommend the most often:

- Daughter of the Forest series for a light-ish but beautiful fantasy/fairy tale

- Ender's Game

- Pride and Prejudice  When people tell me they don't like this, I just assume they have terrible taste and judgement.  It's a good sieve for vetting new friends.

I know I've read a book by Juliet Marillier, but I can't recall the specifics. 

I do like your method of vetting new friends! Thanks for joining in, Monica.

 

Regarding the Lady Trent series:

On 9/12/2019 at 6:29 AM, BarbecueMom said:

 I was SO attached to every character and did not want this series to end.  I am a very private person when it comes to my favorite books, but I will loan this one out and prattle on and on about it to anyone who appears willing to read/listen.

Clearly you feel about Lady Trent the way that I feel about Linesman. I did read and enjoy the first book in the series but have not (yet) continued on. How do you like the author's new book featuring Lady Trent's grand-daughter?

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 6:37 AM, Twigs said:

Jane Eyre.

I read this when I was around twelve; it may be time for a reread! Thank you for sharing, Twigs.

On 9/12/2019 at 6:38 AM, Angie in VA said:

I don't like fiction. There. I said it. If I am allowed to stay here, I will share mine. 

You are definitely encouraged to stay, Angie!

On 9/12/2019 at 6:38 AM, Angie in VA said:

I see Monica in Switzerland mentioned the one book I have bought and given to many people for its message, and that is:

 Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain by John Ratey

You have definitely piqued my interest with your enthusiasm. I will download a sample and give it a look. Thanks for sharing your recommendation, Angie.

Regards,

Kareni

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On 9/12/2019 at 7:24 AM, Pen said:

Through the Eyes of a Stranger (Yaro Tales) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1441545654/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_lnLEDbEZ6VS06

 

I decided to play by the rules and cut my selection to this one.  Especially because it has a hopeful feeling for times when world or life is seeming hard.  

And probably most people will never have even heard of it.

I had indeed not heard of the book, Pen, but you've intrigued me with your enthusiasm. 

On 9/12/2019 at 7:24 AM, Pen said:

 I first learned of it, via a quote in a seed catalog.  No doubt the only fiction book I’ve ever found that way. 

I hadn't thought that seed companies would be likely places for good book recommendations!  I hope that you will get your desired sequel one day! Thanks for sharing, Pen, and for posting the excerpt.

ETA: Thanks also for your mention of The One-Straw Revolution: An Introduction to Natural Farming (New York Review Books Classics) https://www.amazon.com/dp/1590173139/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_dILEDbBM1ZZW9; it looks like a book my husband might enjoy.

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Kareni

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17 minutes ago, Kareni said:
 
Quote

 

  On 9/12/2019 at 9:38 AM, Angie in VA said:

I see Monica in Switzerland mentioned the one book I have bought and given to many people for its message, and that is:

 Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain by John Ratey

 

You have definitely piqued my interest with your enthusiasm. I will download a sample and give it a look. Thanks for sharing your recommendation, Angie.

I have to say I just finished Spark this week, and now I'm feeling like I want to buy a copy for everyone I know and can't shut up about it, so I guess I also concur with this recommendation!

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On 9/12/2019 at 9:04 AM, Mainer said:

Every single Alexander McCall Smith book!  🙂

I tried The No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency when it first came out in the US but then abandoned it. Do you favor one of his series over the others? He's certainly a popular author. I volunteer at the library and am constantly reshelving his books.

On 9/12/2019 at 9:04 AM, Mainer said:

Harry Potter 🙂

Ah, I think I've heard of this series, too! Thanks for chiming in, Mainer.

Regards,

Kareni

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58 minutes ago, Kareni said:

Thanks for your suggestions, Carol. Of your first three, I've heard excellent reviews of the first and third. Who is the author of Uncommon Ground? [I'm guessing it's not this book which I would like to read.]

Of the three books for children, I know the first two but am unfamiliar with In Place of Katya. Who is the author?

Regards,

Kareni

Drat, it is actually 
"Common Ground" by Lukas.

In Place of Katya is probably OOP, but it is absolutely charming if you can find it.  It's by Mara Kay.

 

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