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UGH.  It has been the last year or so that I have had it and it seems to keep getting worse!~. I have prescription cream that alleviates the pain and itching some, but definitely doesn't cure it.

I am trying to read about it but maybe some of you have some remedies, or diet help, or something.

It is on my hands and feet and now my elbows.  I just pray it doesn't start on my face.

I am reading about a bleach bath, aloe, apple cider vinegar, do they work?  Is there something else?  Is food a factor?  I am reading about inflammatory foods, is that the only thing I need to worry about?  Could allergies play a part?  Is any part of this stress?  (if it is, I am up a creek because my life is simply full of stress right now.)

Fill me in because I can't stand this!

Thanks,

Dawn

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this is just from reading elsewhere about auto-immune deficiencies, with references to eczema, so I could be off base.

have you ever tried an anti-inflammatory/helps-auto-immune diet?

 

eta: I have a friend who had a fairly bad case, and things changed when she started a particular diet supplement shake (which I will not recommend, as I think there are better options out there.  that one made me ill both times I tried it.)

Edited by gardenmom5
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So for my dd, her eczema is at times caused by milk or eggs or our cat.  But sometimes it just happens.  And yes, stress can trigger it as can almost anything, really.  Zyrtec can help with the allergic part.  CeraVe products really help.  That was what finally made a dent in some that wouldn't go away with anything else.  She uses the CeraVe Hydrating Body Wash, the CeraVe Moisturizing Cream, and a CeraVe moisturing lotion with sunscreen for her face.  HTH

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Oldest dd has a terrible time with eczema. She is now in her 20s, but in her teens,  I have taken her to Urgent Care more than once with a severe flare.  Do you have a good dermatologist who specializes in skin disorders.  Many derms specialize in cosmetic dermatology or skin cancer.  You need one who really understands eczema.  At one point, dd had 9 different prescriptions: topicals ( steroids of different strengths [face, hands, body, feet need different types], moisturizers) and 2 orals to control her eczema.  They also did a skin biopsy to get a better understanding of her particular type of eczemas (yes, the biopsy found she had multiple types).  There is an eczema that greatly affects hands and feet and there is a particular antihistamine that can help with that specific type of eczema.  Photo therapy helped dd the most.  We started with 3 treatments a week and eventually got down to once a week.  It put her in remission and kept her there for quite a while.  Allergy testing was unremarkable by the way.  Dd has found that stress, hormone fluctuations, heat (think summer....surprisingly she does better in winter), and gluten make her eczema more active.  Keeping her skin hydrated helps too.  But, she has to be VERY careful with what moisturizers she uses. A dermatologist would be able to give recommendations about moisturizers.  2 of dd's original 9 topical prescriptions were for moisturizers.  Now, dd does fairly well with OTC medications and topicals. 

As far as diet goes, it is really individual.  Whatever is causing the flare needs to be avoided.  Some friends have had good results with omegas, evening primrose, etc, but they didn't do much for dd.  Neither did skin specific supplements.  Dd has done bleach baths before.  They can be very drying and you need to use only the recommended amount of bleach and the recommended treatment protocol.  The best thing we did was get a good dermatologist.
 

 

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The thing about the diet is, I haven't changed my diet at all, and then WHAM! I got eczema and had never had it before in my life!

I have no idea if we have a good dermatologist in my area as I have never been to one before.  I assume there are some decent ones.

@gardenmom5, what would the shake need to have in it (ingredients) to help?

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I had eczema as a child (usually inside of elbows) and I can remember flares in early adulthood--I remember seeing a doctor at my college and one when we first moved here 26 years ago, both times to ask for the prescription med that helped me as a kid. Then nothing for a couple of decades, but it returned in my mid-forties. Now I can get flares on my fingers (usually left hand), my neck/jaw, or above my upper lip. Occasionally inside elbows, rarely eyelids. Does not seem diet related at all. What helps keep it all pretty mild for me:

1) Aveeno oatmeal lotion after shower (I finally decided I like this best over Eucerin or Lubriderm)
2) Eucerin cream as my daily face/neck moisturizer. Very soothing.
3) Daily zyrtec
4) Prescription Triamcinolone ointment 0.1% (very mild) for flares. I like the ointment better than the cream. I'm allowed to use it on my face but I'm aware that some people have issues with longterm use, so I try to use it pretty minimally. I've used less than half of my large tube I got 3 years ago. It knocks down a flare for me in just one or two applications.
5) My current dermatologist had me switch from Ivory soap (turns out its not so mild and pure) to Dove for sensitive skin.

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Allergies (hay fever, detergent) were the root factors and stress was the trigger for my nephew and me. Aquaphor/Vaseline on the eczema flares, then socks/gloves/bandages on those areas helped. 

Dishwashing detergents, laundry detergent can cause eczema flare ups. For me, even swimsuits and clothing seams were a factor. 

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I developed about a three inch diameter patch of eczema on my lower left leg a couple of years ago, out of the blue. I'd never had any before. Dry skin yes, but not eczema. I used all sorts of OTC moisturizers and hydrocortisone products, tried different body washes and detergents, and got a prescription for Triamcinolone ointment. None of them really helped, although the Triamcinolone ointment does take away the itch for a little while. About a year after the eczema popped up I was diagnosed with RA (although that wasn't a totally new thing--I'd had symptoms pointing to RA for years). I suspect mine is due to my immune system totally whacking out (I also have Hashi's), but I also think stress was the main trigger that caused it to go haywire. I feel so sorry for people who have a big issue with eczema. The itch and burning of my one little patch can be maddening. I can't imagine dealing with more.

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3 hours ago, DawnM said:

The thing about the diet is, I haven't changed my diet at all, and then WHAM! I got eczema and had never had it before in my life!

I have no idea if we have a good dermatologist in my area as I have never been to one before.  I assume there are some decent ones.

@gardenmom5, what would the shake need to have in it (ingredients) to help?

sorry - it was a vitamin shake.  the molecular forms were cheap (and the product was over priced for what you get).  iow: they didn't absorb very well.   (I have a mtfhf mutation - and a good b-complex is crucial for me.  the b-vitamins in this thing were utter crap.  the longer I was on it, the worse I got.)

vitamins vary by molecular form - and some are easily absorbed than others.

I would start with autoimmune diet, and look at that.

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You need a good dermatologist preferably one who specializes in allergies/environmental stuff.

My regular dermatologist sent me to a specialized dermatologist for allergy testing. I’m allergic to gold (plus all metals) It took a year of being jewelry free to be eczema free.

My son had allergy testing and milk was causing his eczema.

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21 minutes ago, kbutton said:

Psoriasis is a condition with similar symptoms, but it's autoimmune and can lead to psoriatic arthritis. You might need to be sure it's eczema. 

 

My regular doctor said it is eczema.  I guess she could be wrong.  She seemed pretty confident.  I may have to go to a dermatologist.  UGH.  

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1 minute ago, DawnM said:

My regular doctor said it is eczema.  I guess she could be wrong.  She seemed pretty confident.  I may have to go to a dermatologist.  UGH.  

It's more a "keep in mind" since I wasn't sure if you've had any kind of testing. I have known two people with psoriatic arthritis--one had it in her nails, and it was thought to be a fungal thing first. 

It can take a while to get in to a derm (sometimes), so it gives you time to try some of the suggestions. I truly hope you find something on here that does the trick! 

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My dd developed eczema as a reaction to chlorine in water. Short showers, rinsing off after swim, seem to help. She does also have a couple of anaphylactic food allergies, but she doesn’t eat those foods. She has seasonal allergies, as well, but it’s not worse in those seasons. If your water provider upped the chlorine or other decontamination chemicals that could be a cause.

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1 hour ago, scholastica said:

My dd developed eczema as a reaction to chlorine in water. Short showers, rinsing off after swim, seem to help. She does also have a couple of anaphylactic food allergies, but she doesn’t eat those foods. She has seasonal allergies, as well, but it’s not worse in those seasons. If your water provider upped the chlorine or other decontamination chemicals that could be a cause.

 

We were on a well when it started.  We had been on a well for 12 years and had the water tested every year.  No changes.  We are on city water as of July, but the eczema hasn't changed.

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Air conditioning could be a factor too if you have been running the aircon more during summer months. For me, the aircon in our car dried out my throat and my skin during our recent road trip. I learned to pack a vacuum bottle of iced honey water and apply moisturizer before a 6hr car ride in summer.

I have suspected psoriasis on my scalp. My GP wants me to try the Nizoral shampoo before referring me to a dermatologist.

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9 hours ago, Hyacinth said:

Over the years we’ve tried every lotion, potion, diet, and supplement imaginable for ds’s eczema. What we finally hit on that is working beautifully is phototherapy. See if you have a dermatologist nearby that offers it and go for a consultation. 

Huh. I had eczema quite a bit in my late teens and being in the sun seemed to make it much better or eliminate it. Was that basically phototherapy I wonder?

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There are different kinds. Some is a reaction to airborne allergens - pollen or dust. Others are from microbial sensitivity and respond to bleach baths or anti-fungal creams (can easily try over the counter athlete's foot cream - won't hurt anything and if it is going to help it will be obvious in a few days at the longest). Others are from food allergies. Others are not actual eczema but misdiagnosed psoriasis or the rash caused by celiac, etc. 

All are helped by NOT using hot water to bathe/shower, and applying a heavy cream immediately after. Soak and slather is the term used I think. So lukewarm shower/bath or soak of some kind, and then within the first 30 seconds after getting out you slather on the cream. Aveeno Baby Soothing Cream is the only thing that helps mine. But it has to be that fast. Keep it right by the shower. Pat dry, gently, then smear on the lotion. 

If that doesn't help, try the anti fungal, and yes, antihistamines can help in some cases. 

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On 9/8/2019 at 4:17 AM, DawnM said:

The thing about the diet is, I haven't changed my diet at all, and then WHAM! I got eczema and had never had it before in my life!

I have no idea if we have a good dermatologist in my area as I have never been to one before.  I assume there are some decent ones.

@gardenmom5, what would the shake need to have in it (ingredients) to help?

I don't know your age but it seems that as you get older allergies you had a a young child come back.  I seem to know a lot of people who were sensitive to milk/gluten/nuts in early childhood, could eat them from mid teens to late 40's then started to get problems again and had to change their diet.

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52 minutes ago, kiwik said:

I don't know your age but it seems that as you get older allergies you had a a young child come back.  I seem to know a lot of people who were sensitive to milk/gluten/nuts in early childhood, could eat them from mid teens to late 40's then started to get problems again and had to change their diet.

 

Darn!  I am early 50s

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On 9/7/2019 at 7:30 AM, DawnM said:

 

It is on my hands and feet and now my elbows.  I just pray it doesn't start on my face.

I am reading about a bleach bath, aloe, apple cider vinegar, do they work?  Is there something else?  Is food a factor?  I am reading about inflammatory foods, is that the only thing I need to worry about?  Could allergies play a part?  Is any part of this stress?  (if it is, I am up a creek because my life is simply full of stress right now.)

 

What does the eczema on your hands and feet look like?  Do you have what looks like clear blisters on the palms of your hands and the sides of your fingers and on the soles of your feet?  I've had dyshidrotic eczema on my hands for a few years.  The dermatologist was really no help...just a topical steroid prescription  and no help with getting to the cause. 

I found a website about a low nickel diet that may help with this kind of eczema.  As it happened, I was eating a lot of very high nickel foods from the list, and I really noticed a difference when I cut out those foods.  

https://www.pennstatehershey.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=0888ec6e-3d2f-4766-833e-b38bd920ffcd&groupId=102184

In December I had some dental surgery on my gum.  I had complications for awhile after the surgery(lots of bleeding) so when I felt like I could eat more solid foods I wanted soft things.  After eating a lot of egg salad I ended up with eczema all over the place...legs, arms, torso.  It got better when I quit eating eggs.  I also found that chocolate hazelnut spread (Costco's version of Nutella)  caused a big red itchy patch on my neck that went away when I quit eating it.   I have no idea why certain foods affected only certain places on my skin...it was very weird!  

I'm still dealing with eczema on my forearms and the tops of my hands that started this Spring...I blame "Spring Cleaning" because I have an allergy to dust mites.   I quit using the steroid ointment because the eczema always comes back.  Now I'm trying to avoid contact with dust  by wearing long sleeves and gloves while I'm vacuuming, etc.  

And I'm sorry to say that I think stress makes it worse. 

 

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19 hours ago, Dotwithaperiod said:

I’ve read several stories from people who swear that Beekman 1802 goats-milk products greatly alleviated or cured their eczema. 

I've spent so much money on the various recommended brands of  creams, lotions, etc. for sensitive skin and eczema only to find that they sting and burn.

I really  like the "Pure" (fragrance free) Beekman products.   I use the bar soap, body cream, hand salve, and hand lotion.  I also started using the "Pure" shampoo and conditioner because my usual scented brands were stinging my skin in the shower.   

(*Beekman products are featured on HSN today with free shipping! )

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24 minutes ago, Laurie said:

What does the eczema on your hands and feet look like?  Do you have what looks like clear blisters on the palms of your hands and the sides of your fingers and on the soles of your feet?  I've had dyshidrotic eczema on my hands for a few years.  The dermatologist was really no help...just a topical steroid prescription  and no help with getting to the cause. 

I found a website about a low nickel diet that may help with this kind of eczema.  As it happened, I was eating a lot of very high nickel foods from the list, and I really noticed a difference when I cut out those foods.  

https://www.pennstatehershey.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=0888ec6e-3d2f-4766-833e-b38bd920ffcd&groupId=102184

In December I had some dental surgery on my gum.  I had complications for awhile after the surgery(lots of bleeding) so when I felt like I could eat more solid foods I wanted soft things.  After eating a lot of egg salad I ended up with eczema all over the place...legs, arms, torso.  It got better when I quit eating eggs.  I also found that chocolate hazelnut spread (Costco's version of Nutella)  caused a big red itchy patch on my neck that went away when I quit eating it.   I have no idea why certain foods affected only certain places on my skin...it was very weird!  

I'm still dealing with eczema on my forearms and the tops of my hands that started this Spring...I blame "Spring Cleaning" because I have an allergy to dust mites.   I quit using the steroid ointment because the eczema always comes back.  Now I'm trying to avoid contact with dust  by wearing long sleeves and gloves while I'm vacuuming, etc.  

And I'm sorry to say that I think stress makes it worse. 

 

 

I have never heard of this.  My eczema doesn't look like clear blisters, it looks like scaly skin.

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35 minutes ago, DawnM said:

 

I have never heard of this.  My eczema doesn't look like clear blisters, it looks like scaly skin.

Have you tried using Vaseline?  You could use it at night with socks/gloves.  

CeraVe makes a product called "Healing Ointment" which is basically vaseline/petroleum jelly with some added things like ceramides to help maintain the skin barrier.   

 

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1 hour ago, Laurie said:

CeraVe makes a product called "Healing Ointment" which is basically vaseline/petroleum jelly with some added things like ceramides to help maintain the skin barrier.   

 

We just started using this for DD. That and regular Vaseline are the only things that don't burn. (Even my gentle CeraVe lotions were burning, but she needed something because she was super itchy/dry/scaly). We were using Vaseline before, but I was hoping this would help more. So far, so good. 

Oh, and I also found a swivel stick of Palmer's Cocoa Butter that didn't cause issues with her skin and used that on her lips (her upper lip was super dry).

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2 hours ago, alisoncooks said:

We just started using this for DD. That and regular Vaseline are the only things that don't burn. (Even my gentle CeraVe lotions were burning, but she needed something because she was super itchy/dry/scaly). We were using Vaseline before, but I was hoping this would help more. So far, so good. 

Oh, and I also found a swivel stick of Palmer's Cocoa Butter that didn't cause issues with her skin and used that on her lips (her upper lip was super dry).

Most "sensitive skin" stuff burns me terribly, but the Aveeno Baby Extra Soothing Creme doesn't at all, and I actually now use it as my daily facial moisturizer. 

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37 minutes ago, DawnM said:

I went to a doctor today, about something else, and he told me there is a shot for eczema.  

If you mean Dupixent,  I don't think it's a one-time thing.  I know someone who uses Dupixent for severe eczema.  She has to give herself weekly injections in the stomach area.  

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50 minutes ago, Laurie said:

If you mean Dupixent,  I don't think it's a one-time thing.  I know someone who uses Dupixent for severe eczema.  She has to give herself weekly injections in the stomach area.  

 

The doctor I went to today said it was monthly?  But he wasn't that well versed on it.

Interesting.

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On 9/8/2019 at 6:46 PM, Laurie said:

What does the eczema on your hands and feet look like?  Do you have what looks like clear blisters on the palms of your hands and the sides of your fingers and on the soles of your feet?  I've had dyshidrotic eczema on my hands for a few years.  The dermatologist was really no help...just a topical steroid prescription  and no help with getting to the cause. 

I found a website about a low nickel diet that may help with this kind of eczema.  As it happened, I was eating a lot of very high nickel foods from the list, and I really noticed a difference when I cut out those foods.  

https://www.pennstatehershey.org/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=0888ec6e-3d2f-4766-833e-b38bd920ffcd&groupId=102184

In December I had some dental surgery on my gum.  I had complications for awhile after the surgery(lots of bleeding) so when I felt like I could eat more solid foods I wanted soft things.  After eating a lot of egg salad I ended up with eczema all over the place...legs, arms, torso.  It got better when I quit eating eggs.  I also found that chocolate hazelnut spread (Costco's version of Nutella)  caused a big red itchy patch on my neck that went away when I quit eating it.   I have no idea why certain foods affected only certain places on my skin...it was very weird!  

I'm still dealing with eczema on my forearms and the tops of my hands that started this Spring...I blame "Spring Cleaning" because I have an allergy to dust mites.   I quit using the steroid ointment because the eczema always comes back.  Now I'm trying to avoid contact with dust  by wearing long sleeves and gloves while I'm vacuuming, etc.  

And I'm sorry to say that I think stress makes it worse. 

 

This just confirms spring cleaning is harmful to ones health. 😄

Edited by itsheresomewhere
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