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CuriousMomof3

If you count hours or days for school . . .

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How do you decide what counts?  I feel as though school/not school could be a very fuzzy line.  For example, if I went to a museum on a Tuesday with just my homeschooled kid, I think that would be school, but if I went to the same museum on a Saturday, or during summer vacation, I don't know what I'd do.   

I'm not really asking for myself.  I'm in a state where I don't need to report hours.  I'm just curious. 

Edited by CuriousMomof3

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It depends on the year, age of child, etc.  When I taught museum visits were a day of school.  There shouldn't be any hard and fast rule, imho.  Yes, there are parents who are enriching outside of school, but that doesn't mean that every family would be enriching everything.  I count music lessons for my children as school (for the under high schoolers).  I don't do an extra lesson during school in addition to piano lessons.  Sometimes we did art lessons at home and in a class. Sometimes we don't.  Some years we did PE at home and a sport, some years we didn't.  Some years they were doing 2 sports at once.  Basically, I aimed for balance and coverage--are we making steady progress in all subjects and are we having enrichment activities/field trips.  I doesn't matter to my family how many hours. 

The children who go to museums as a family aren't doing other things that my family are doing in the hours that we have free bc I counted the museum as school. Does that make sense?  There is a fluid line between good families and homeschool which is why kids whose families value education do well in b&m school.  If you saw my homeschooled kids and their cousins who go to b&m school in a good district and did tons of museum visits on weekends as family, you probably wouldn't be able to tell which are which.  It's not really about hours of education.

And I do count physical activity during the summer and weekends as school for reporting purposes.  I also list their summer and weekend museum visits. 

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1 hour ago, freesia said:

It depends on the year, age of child, etc.  When I taught museum visits were a day of school.  There shouldn't be any hard and fast rule, imho.  Yes, there are parents who are enriching outside of school, but that doesn't mean that every family would be enriching everything.  I count music lessons for my children as school (for the under high schoolers).  I don't do an extra lesson during school in addition to piano lessons.  Sometimes we did art lessons at home and in a class. Sometimes we don't.  Some years we did PE at home and a sport, some years we didn't.  Some years they were doing 2 sports at once.  Basically, I aimed for balance and coverage--are we making steady progress in all subjects and are we having enrichment activities/field trips.  I doesn't matter to my family how many hours. 

The children who go to museums as a family aren't doing other things that my family are doing in the hours that we have free bc I counted the museum as school. Does that make sense?  There is a fluid line between good families and homeschool which is why kids whose families value education do well in b&m school.  If you saw my homeschooled kids and their cousins who go to b&m school in a good district and did tons of museum visits on weekends as family, you probably wouldn't be able to tell which are which.  It's not really about hours of education.

And I do count physical activity during the summer and weekends as school for reporting purposes.  I also list their summer and weekend museum visits. 


It makes perfect sense to me as a way to plan for what your kids do, and make sure their needs are met.  I guess I'm not clear how it translates to the records that people keep on paper.  

Again, I think this doesn't apply to me at all, which is probably good since I'm confused, but I'm still curious.  

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I keep records for hours & days.
I look at trips like museums as an individual case by case basis.  Are we going there because it enhances our studies?  It counts.  Family time?  Maybe counts.  Turned out to be more on the fun scale and not on the educational side?  Doesn't count.  We went to a ren faire this week.  I thought about counting it because last year we did SOTW vol. 2 and it would have been a nice representation, but honestly this was the least educational use of our time that I could have planned that day.  It did not get added to our records.

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2 hours ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

How do you decide what counts?  I feel as though school/not school could be a very fuzzy line.  For example, if I went to a museum on a Tuesday with just my homeschooled kid, I think that would be school, but if I went to the same museum on a Saturday, or during summer vacation, I don't know what I'd do.   

 

Why would it matter which day of the week you went to an educational activity? To me, it either "counts" or it doesn't. Saturday vs. Tuesday is irrelevant. 

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2 minutes ago, MerryAtHope said:

 

Why would it matter which day of the week you went to an educational activity? To me, it either "counts" or it doesn't. Saturday vs. Tuesday is irrelevant. 


I guess in my case, because I'd be bringing my kids who go to school, and it wouldn't count as school for them?  I'm not really sure, and your question helps me clarify my thinking.

And because if we counted weekend stuff, we'd have a lot of 6 and 7 day weeks, and I'm not sure what purpose would be served by reporting those hours?

 

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Keeping track is easy. I keep a plan book. I write in things like this. For instance this week I write in the margins—summer PE and listed what they did.  I write any unplanned extras like museums, too  

If you are asking how does it fit in to a daily count it’s more fluid than that. I guess I don’t keep stick to the minute records.  I plan for 180 days and then plan our activities and curriculum goals and then they all kind of happen but not in a neat 9-3 kind of way. The weekend museum trip might balance a day like today when we had an early birthday party.

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6 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


I guess in my case, because I'd be bringing my kids who go to school, and it wouldn't count as school for them?  I'm not really sure, and your question helps me clarify my thinking.

And because if we counted weekend stuff, we'd have a lot of 6 and 7 day weeks, and I'm not sure what purpose would be served by reporting those hours?

 

You might find this way of thinking shifting as you get further into your year. It’s not really about serving a purpose one way or the other. If you only need to do 180 days, you do.  I write 300+ Per quarter hours because it doesn’t matter that we school let’s say 356 bc the law only requires 300. When I list what I do, I list things from weekends bc I need to show what I covered.  If I think a child is feeling overwhelmed bc they feel like they are doing school 6 days a week, we cut something. 

So, I report that we’ve met the required hours because we do.  I list what we do to show that we’ve covered what we must no matter when it happens ( even if it happened in hours that aren’t required.)

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Oh, and while it doesn’t count as school for you schooled kids, it still counts as education.  The schools don’t quantify it as such bc they are responsible for reporting on what they are required to teach, nit what the child knows or is learning ( except an alternative school perhaps.).

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10 minutes ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


I guess in my case, because I'd be bringing my kids who go to school, and it wouldn't count as school for them?  I'm not really sure, and your question helps me clarify my thinking.

And because if we counted weekend stuff, we'd have a lot of 6 and 7 day weeks, and I'm not sure what purpose would be served by reporting those hours?

 

Well, that's another question too! So, if you're in a state where you would have to count hours--some states require a ton of hours even for little kids. That can be ridiculous if you get done with most book work in about an hour. So for them, you'd absolutely want to count every last thing! 

I'm with you that a lot of what we do educationally is just the stuff I think of as "parenting." But it really IS educational, and if you have to comply with red tape, count it.

Basically, you're after-schooling your other kids :-).

I was not in a state that required me to turn in hours or days, but I kept track anyway, mainly as a way of seeing what we had accomplished and as a way of keeping myself accountable (I always knew how many days into our school year we were etc..., and could easily see if there was a reason we were ahead or behind where I expected us to be at that point.) And it was very helpful by high school to be in that habit--I had learned easy ways of tracking hours for credits. 

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15 minutes ago, MerryAtHope said:

 

Well, that's another question too! So, if you're in a state where you would have to count hours--some states require a ton of hours even for little kids. That can be ridiculous if you get done with most book work in about an hour. So for them, you'd absolutely want to count every last thing! 

I'm with you that a lot of what we do educationally is just the stuff I think of as "parenting." But it really IS educational, and if you have to comply with red tape, count it.

Basically, you're after-schooling your other kids :-).

I was not in a state that required me to turn in hours or days, but I kept track anyway, mainly as a way of seeing what we had accomplished and as a way of keeping myself accountable (I always knew how many days into our school year we were etc..., and could easily see if there was a reason we were ahead or behind where I expected us to be at that point.) And it was very helpful by high school to be in that habit--I had learned easy ways of tracking hours for credits. 


Can you tell me how you keep track of them?  I'm obviously super new at this, if you couldn't tell from my questions.  I've been homeschooling somewhere between two and eight days, depending on how you count, LOL.  

 

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1 minute ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


Can you tell me how you keep track of them?  I'm obviously super new at this, if you couldn't tell from my questions.  I've been homeschooling somewhere between two and eight days, depending on how you count, LOL.  

 

Oh, wait, I just realized I do have a system for tracking hours i high school hours for some classes.  My kids have plan books which list the subjects and days of the weeks.  So, if we are tracking hours for lets say PE, each square of PE has a couple of circles in it.  Each circle is divided into 4 sections.  Then the child keeps track of the time spend (rounded up or down sometimes) by coloring in amount of quarters.  I added them weekly to see if we were on track in that subject.

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1 minute ago, freesia said:

Oh, wait, I just realized I do have a system for tracking hours i high school hours for some classes.  My kids have plan books which list the subjects and days of the weeks.  So, if we are tracking hours for lets say PE, each square of PE has a couple of circles in it.  Each circle is divided into 4 sections.  Then the child keeps track of the time spend (rounded up or down sometimes) by coloring in amount of quarters.  I added them weekly to see if we were on track in that subject.


Did you buy these plan books somewhere?  Are they specific for homeschooling? Maybe I need a plan book, or maybe I can make my own.

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In my state we have to have school for 180 days. I print a school-year calendar, all on one page, and then put an "x" through each day that I count. If we "do math" and English or foreign language that generally meets my minimum requirement for a day.

Now that I have a couple in high school I look at it a bit differently for them, but I'm building on all those years of box-checking experience for my intuitive feel for whether we are doing enough.

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1 hour ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


Did you buy these plan books somewhere?  Are they specific for homeschooling? Maybe I need a plan book, or maybe I can make my own.

I make my own plan book. I may have gotten the idea from a homeschool planner, though. Possibly it was Debra Bell’s. I like making my own. I have a place for menu planning each week and my grade book sheets in the back. The kids have places to write what they will do each day and syllabi for classes in the back ( my high schoolers,). 

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1 minute ago, freesia said:

I make my own plan book. I may have gotten the idea from a homeschool planner, though. Possibly it was Debra Bell’s. I like making my own. I have a place for menu planning each week and my grade book sheets in the back. The kids have places to write what they will do each day and syllabi for classes in the back ( my high schoolers,). 


Do you have one book, and they all write on their own pages in the book?  Or do they each have their own?  I wish I could see this book!

I should note that I'm clearly being nosy, because I'm homeschooling one kid.  So whether I have one book for each kid or one book for all my homeschooled kids together, it would be the same.  

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8 hours ago, CuriousMomof3 said:


Do you have one book, and they all write on their own pages in the book?  Or do they each have their own?  I wish I could see this book!

I should note that I'm clearly being nosy, because I'm homeschooling one kid.  So whether I have one book for each kid or one book for all my homeschooled kids together, it would be the same.  

No problem with your nosiness. Lol. I am interested in systems, too. I wish I could have you over and show you. 

We each have our own. Mine organizes my whole life. I would plan for the kids in it when they were young. Once each hit about fourth grade they got their own.  I plan directly into each. Anything we all do together ( like a study skills book I’m reading aloud) goes in mine ( except for the child who needs it written in his or he feels like I’m not being straight with him about his day.)

I’m on my phone right now, but I’ll see if I can upload an example or link to a sample that’s close.

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17 hours ago, CuriousMomof3 said:

How do you decide what counts?  I feel as though school/not school could be a very fuzzy line.  For example, if I went to a museum on a Tuesday with just my homeschooled kid, I think that would be school, but if I went to the same museum on a Saturday, or during summer vacation, I don't know what I'd do.   

I'm not really asking for myself.  I'm in a state where I don't need to report hours.  I'm just curious. 

Everything counts.

If i had to count hours or days, I would make up a calendar, Monday through Friday, and I'd put a check mark on each day that we got out of bed, excluding legal holidays, until we reached the required hours/days (each day would be assumed to be four hours). The end.

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19 hours ago, MerryAtHope said:

 

Well, that's another question too! So, if you're in a state where you would have to count hours--some states require a ton of hours even for little kids. That can be ridiculous if you get done with most book work in about an hour. So for them, you'd absolutely want to count every last thing! 

I'm with you that a lot of what we do educationally is just the stuff I think of as "parenting." But it really IS educational, and if you have to comply with red tape, count it.

Basically, you're after-schooling your other kids :-).

I was not in a state that required me to turn in hours or days, but I kept track anyway, mainly as a way of seeing what we had accomplished and as a way of keeping myself accountable (I always knew how many days into our school year we were etc..., and could easily see if there was a reason we were ahead or behind where I expected us to be at that point.) And it was very helpful by high school to be in that habit--I had learned easy ways of tracking hours for credits. 

Yes, I'm in a state where I have to count hours. For younger ones I count life skills and anything somewhat educational because we did that much seat work. With my older ones I just count seat work because it is enough and I don't want to mess with counting it if I don't have to.

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On 9/3/2019 at 5:41 PM, freesia said:

I count music lessons for my children as school (for the under high schoolers).

Why don't you count it for high schoolers? Do you have enough other credits? 

I am not required to count days, and I attest to hours but don't have to prove them. 

OP, I use a $3 planner from the Target dollar spot that is geared toward teachers. I subdivide some of the rows in half to be more specific (like instead of a big language arts square, I draw a line through the square to show grammar, composition, lit, etc.). I write in what my younger kiddo should do. He does it, and I check it (or do it together), and then we use a highlighter to show that we did it. Easy peasy. 

It's a two-page spread calendar, and the right-hand side has a place for notes. I cut a portion of that notes section off each week so that I don't have to re-copy the list of subjects every week, lol! The first week's list is visible on the left at all times when I cut that strip off. If I change midyear to tweak subjects, then I leave it intact and that becomes my new list of subjects going forward.

My older son (high school) uses the same kind of planner, but we discuss what he has to do, and he aims to put an hour of each major subject in the box each day. However, he does his own shuffling around things like band or outside appointments (I do that for the younger one). He can choose to double up on one day to make another day lighter, etc. 

We started with a Five J's planner though that helped with this. https://fivejs.com/homeschool-weekly-assignment-planner/  We just found that something bound from Target for $3 was nice to have around. 

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On 9/3/2019 at 4:29 PM, CuriousMomof3 said:

How do you decide what counts?  I feel as though school/not school could be a very fuzzy line.  For example, if I went to a museum on a Tuesday with just my homeschooled kid, I think that would be school, but if I went to the same museum on a Saturday, or during summer vacation, I don't know what I'd do.   

I'm not really asking for myself.  I'm in a state where I don't need to report hours.  I'm just curious. 

 

just another opinion in the mix here.  I'm in a state where we need 180 days (and a day is supposed to be 4 hours to count). most cover schools in my state don't require it down to the minute. I have homeschooled long enough to know there are hours of Structured Learning, and Unstructured but Productive times of education. and all of it adds up in a day to count.  So I know we get the hours on days that are "attendance".   With the example you gave of going to museum, I would count it for school time/day without caring if it was M - F, or S/S or summer or not.   I understand that your other children (who attend brick and mortar school) would not get it to count because they are not attending with their school. But your homeschool student is with his school on Saturday or summer so, it could count.   Different schools in the same city can have different schedules, so it's not that big of a deal if your school (at home) has some weekend "days". 

for keeping "attendance", I use a simple calendar with check boxes.  Currently using one on my state's dept of ed site for homeschoolers . I keep that paper copy for me and then send in an online report to my cover school (that's a thing in my state to be legal).  I can send a link to your PM box on here if it would help you count days. It's just check boxes of each day of month.

For planning and staying on track for stuff to teach, for most of my years of homeschooling, I used pre purchased lesson plans with curriculum (mfwbooks) and just used that.   With my youngest (special ed and using a variety of publishers), I use a planner from schoolhouseteachers.com  Looks like the free samples on their site called weekly custom https://schoolhouseteachers.com/member-resources/custom-schedule-builder/

Yes, some of it is fuzzy in terms of days/hours.  But not really.  Learning and school is not limited to 8:15-2:15 M-F.   So many things count.  When I lived in a state that required days but did not define that day as 4 hours or more, I still tended toward being around 3-4 hours of structured/unstructured productive learning for it to be a day.  And when it snowed, we still got school done and played in the snow on the same day!  wake up to snow, play for a while, come in to warm up and read a story/history/science.  go back out, come in and have math. play again that day. get rest of planned lessons.   why not? I can remember one year where it snowed about 18 inches in one day and the snow stayed around long time.  We jumped ahead in the lesson planner from the curriculum company and did the "antarctica snow science" lessons that day.  LOL.   awesome memories of the kids playing.  so glad we were doing geography that year.  can't plan that stuff.  love it.

but yeah, I counted some attendance during June/July in most years.  in younger years, vbs week was a school week.  in older years, it was not a school day to serve in vbs, but the hours were recorded for volunteer time just like the students from brick and mortar schools were doing.   No reason weekends can't count. and we even do school on labor day this week. still had lots of time to goof off too.

 

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In my state, we have to track each child's days of school completed, but we don't have to hit a certain minimum number of days, and there's no guideline for what constitutes a day. Either the day is checked off or it's not. We usually do 200-225 days.

A minimum "day" for me is math + language arts, or an authentically educational field trip related to our studies. The number of hours should vary with age.

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In my province, I don't have to track anything.  I do keep records though, just in case we get audited (which would be very unlikely), and because it's a useful tool to review progression. 

My record book has 2 main sections:  The first main section tracks seat work and time spent on formal curricula.  I print out a grid (excel spreadsheet) for each kid, with room for 5 dates (one "week") along the top, and a list of curricular materials down the side.  Each day we do seat work, I pencil in the page numbers, or just a check mark, depending what makes sense for each resource.  This is for documenting text-booky/workbooky subjects like math, spelling, grammar, french.  The second main section is an unstructured daily journal of stuff we do and places we go.  This captures projects, trips, interesting discussions, extra-curriculars, games played, and everything else educational that isn't seat work.  I'm very liberal about what I document here.  If it's at all educational, it goes in.   I also have a pouch in the binder where I put all the hardware the kids bring home: certificates, ribbons, "report cards" from swimming lessons, museum guides, pamphlets from places we visit, theatre tickets, etc.  I also have minor sections for tracking volunteer hours (for scouting) and other scouting projects, and a planning section which is mostly lists of things and books I want to explore.

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The sum total of the homeschooling law here in New Zealand is that I education my kids "as regularly and as well as public school."  Haha.  How is that for open to interpretation! I'm with Ellie, I count it ALL.

Edited by lewelma
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16 hours ago, kbutton said:

Why don't you count it for high schoolers? Do you have enough other credits? 

I am not required to count days, and I attest to hours but don't have to prove the

 

 

I am not the original poster on that, but I read that as meaning "with youngest if the only thing that gets done is they do is music lessons that counts as a day of attendance. But with high schoolers they need to do more than just music lessons to count as a full day of school."   I'm not sure what she meant and hopefully she'll explain later.   With that said,  I have counted a full day for my youngest when she has to perform at both recitals for piano.  That was a full day attendance in grade 11 for her since each recital is about 1.5 hours (times 2) plus the time in between where she was assisting the teacher with set up and refreshments and handing out programs. My daughter is one of the advanced students in this studio and had to perform at each recital.  (have to brag on that a little because of her special needs.  she has a skill learned yeah!)    Even though my daughter was not the only student playing, I view it similar to a student in group school where you sit when another student is giving report.  It still counts for full time being present and not just the 10 minutes of her playing because it was a required part of the class.  But, I did not count as attendance the morning they played Christmas songs at the library lobby, or time spent at the nursing home playing Christmas songs for the residents.  That was volunteer time and part of volunteer/service hours outside of school time.   I guess my point is all of this is really flexible and individual and a very different mindset from brick and mortar.

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I don't have to keep track in my state, but I am this year for my own curiosity and to satisfy dh, who is concerned we don't do enough formal school. So I did some quick math. If public school is ideally 180 days, I started there.  Then I subtracted 10 days because that's how many absences you can have without it being an issue, so 170. Then I subtracted another 10 for parties, testing, special days like field day, etc. And maybe another 5 for field trips. All told, that leaves about 155 days of academic learning, in theory. We school year round, taking breaks as wanted for whatever reason. So I decided to look at it monthly. If I average 13 days of academics a month, we are on track. I printed out a July-July calendar that just lists days. Each day we do a day of "academic" work, I put an x. Each day we do a field trip I'd count as school-type work, I put a circle. I keep track of field trips just because I'm curious. Counting this way, for my own records and curiosity, I can focus purely on academic book work, as that's what I'm interested in tracking. I know there is value in other learning and we do that, but I'm only tracking the book learning. It's a fairly simple method but it works for me. Oh, and the printout it is on the wall right by where we do school, so I don't forget to mark them or lose it.

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3 hours ago, cbollin said:

I am not the original poster on that, but I read that as meaning "with youngest if the only thing that gets done is they do is music lessons that counts as a day of attendance. But with high schoolers they need to do more than just music lessons to count as a full day of school."   I'm not sure what she meant and hopefully she'll explain later. 

That explanation makes sense. 

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20 hours ago, kbutton said:

Why don't you count it for high schoolers? Do you have enough other credits? 

I am not required to count days, and I attest to hours but don't have to prove them. 

OP, I use a $3 planner from the Target dollar spot that is geared toward teachers. I subdivide some of the rows in half to be more specific (like instead of a big language arts square, I draw a line through the square to show grammar, composition, lit, etc.). I write in what my younger kiddo should do. He does it, and I check it (or do it together), and then we use a highlighter to show that we did it. Easy peasy. 

It's a two-page spread calendar, and the right-hand side has a place for notes. I cut a portion of that notes section off each week so that I don't have to re-copy the list of subjects every week, lol! The first week's list is visible on the left at all times when I cut that strip off. If I change midyear to tweak subjects, then I leave it intact and that becomes my new list of subjects going forward.

I only count it for the high schoolers who are earning a music credit. My other high schoolers ( and years we don’t count it as credit) we use it as an extra curricular activity.

@cbollin what I meant was not that music lessons make it a full day of school. I meant that where b&m schooled kids might also have a music class at school in addition to piano lessons, some years my kids have only the piano lessons and I count that as part of their academic program instead of an extracurricular. It is their required music.

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We're supposed to do 180 days of 4 hrs/day.  I keep up with the days but am not particular about counting the time exactly.  When the kids were young (K-3) the actual book work was usually less than 2 hrs, but I'd mentally count productive play (builidng things, puzzles, crafts), reading for fun, physical activity, and educational TV (PBS kids shows, documentaries).  By the time that my kids get to 4th grade, the work usually takes at least 4 hours anyway, and definitely crosses 4 if I include any kind of educational play, TV, or physical activity.  

As for days, I happily count field trips, etc.  The year that we took a major trip at the start of August, our 'first day of school' occurred in the airport and I recorded several days of school as we saw natural and historic sights. I didn't count the days that we sat on the beach.  🙂  For us, the problem with counting every field trip day is that we'd run out of time to complete our math if we don't do it most days (we have co-op one day so we already do our bookwork in 4 days/week).  But, I average it out - we may do 3 math lessons in the car on day 1 of a trip, then do field trip stuff for 2 more days - that's 3 days of school.  

I don't have that problem with every book or subject - I choose to skip or combine chapters, to move more quickly or slowly, etc, all the time.  My kids seem to understand the situation - they're good with doubling up on certain things or making use of travel time so that we can have several days not-book-learning school.  I guess I have the schedule that we have on regular days and then I have our abbreviated day schedule, and when we do fun days I just make sure that the work from the abbreviated schedule gets done for the number of days that we miss.  And, obviously, if I record 180 days of school and there are 3 lessons left in the math book, we just do them after the official last day of school.

This sort of schedule problem may be less of an issue for year-round schoolers.  We take our breaks at specific times and like to finish the first semester in December (followed by at least 3 weeks of break) and then a long summer (that has travel/vacation, scout, sport, or other fun camp, gardening, and a lot of downtime.  Everybody likes to start the year with (mostly)  a stack of new stuff, not leftover lessons from last year, so the kids are motivated to finish.  

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4 hours ago, kbutton said:

That explanation makes sense. 

 it wasn't the right explanation though.  LOL.  wink.  There are so many right ways to count and evaluate.  It's very individualized.

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I have always counted weeks.  I pay attention to how much of our curricula *I* think we should cover in a week and we do that.  I could write up descriptions of other activities / uses of time to justify why the time should count, but why?  I don't have to report it, so I don't document a lot of stuff I could.  It used to bother me that my "records" were incomplete (former accountant, lol), but I got over it.  Lots of "life" is worth counting (chores, kitchen tasks, hygiene, cleaning, shopping, exercise, etc, etc), but if you don't have to report it, just let it go and enjoy it.  

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13 hours ago, Another Lynn said:

I have always counted weeks.  I pay attention to how much of our curricula *I* think we should cover in a week and we do that.  I could write up descriptions of other activities / uses of time to justify why the time should count, but why?  I don't have to report it, so I don't document a lot of stuff I could.  It used to bother me that my "records" were incomplete (former accountant, lol), but I got over it.  Lots of "life" is worth counting (chores, kitchen tasks, hygiene, cleaning, shopping, exercise, etc, etc), but if you don't have to report it, just let it go and enjoy it.  

I schedule out by weeks and always divide curriculum that way. BUT ITA with you, I wouldn't count hours if I didn't have to.

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