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ktgrok
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It drives me crazy when people who totally are capable of preparing don't bother, and then when the storm hits end up needing others to share their stuff. My neighbor just said in chat that she is unprepared, has one flashlight, not sure if any batteries, no water, etc. She is very capable of ordering on amazon or going to the store to pick up flashlights and batteries, and they have the funds. Other years other people do the same thing, nothing for the kids to really snack on, no flashlights, etc. I just ordered more battery operated LED lanterns and fans because last year we lent several out and I don't think we got them back. I don't mind sharing if you can't get stuff yourself, or didn't know what you needed, but when there are several days left to prep and you just are not going to....grr. I think I posted a few years ago about how I offered to help my sister prep and she said, "meh...I'm sure a mc'donalds will be open at some point, and my cell phone has a flashlight app". She has kids! Thankfully my parents ended up staying with her and brought food and flashlights and such. 

 

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I can understand being new to an area and not “getting it”. When I was new to the south I didn’t understand the severe thunderstorm warnings. Like what’s the big deal about a thunderstorm?  Well, at our first house we had a tree down that smashed our playset and storage building. Our second house we had a tree knocked on our roof which came through our living room. Now in our third house all we have had is cars totaled by baseball size hail. But I “got it” after the first tree.

Hurricanes. Gosh it is hard to see how anyone doesn’t prepare. And if I was new in a hurricane zone I’m sure I’d overprepare and be mocked for freaking out. But why not have basic supplies? Great if you don’t need them. There will be a “next time” and you’ll be ready. Maybe some people just want to brag about not freaking out and then after say they “knew it would be nothing.” People are weird.

I will say that the people in my life like this are like this about everything. They also happen to have people (usually extended family) that will jump in and rescue them. I just don’t have anyone in my life at the ready to bail me out. But a lot of my peers have parents (who are not by any stretch young) who would be bringing supplies and getting them set up. 

I would be selfish about my provisions for sure. I would probably be telling the irresponsible folks in advance that I wouldn’t be sharing. Then I wouldn’t feel as bad.

 

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That just doesn't make sense but people often don't make sense. We've never evacuated even when others did (we've never actually been in either a mandatory or voluntary evacuation zone) but we always prepared. I would think especially after what the panhandle went through with Michael, that people would be more likely to prepare. 

My friends and I are sharing silly memes on social media but behind the scenes we're getting ready for the storm.

I remember when your sister wouldn't prepare and your mother (? I think) wouldn't evacuate, and how stressful that was for you.

50 minutes ago, teachermom2834 said:

I can understand being new to an area and not “getting it”. 

Hurricanes. Gosh it is hard to see how anyone doesn’t prepare. And if I was new in a hurricane zone I’m sure I’d overprepare and be mocked for freaking out. But why not have basic supplies? Great if you don’t need them. There will be a “next time” and you’ll be ready. Maybe some people just want to brag about not freaking out and then after say they “knew it would be nothing.” People are weird.

 

Often new people are terrified and over prepare, which is better than not being prepared. A lot of times it's native or long time Floridians who scoff at preparing for a hurricane, until they learn the hard way that they should have done something.

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I am really far inland, but after living through Fran in 1996, I am always over-prepared when a storm might come through. Honestly, I'll never forget sitting in the bathroom, no lights, no phone (this was before I had a cell phone) and listening to the storm, hearing tornadoes and trees coming down. Then, because I hadn't gone shopping, I had little food in the house that I could eat without cooking, the grocery stores were either closed due to power outages, storm damage or stocking issues (so many trees were down, roads were blocked & deliveries couldn't get through). I was also about 5 months pregnant and hungry! So yes - we have flashlights, batteries, a battery operated radio, and if a storm might head our way, we make sure to have propane gas for the grill and some foods that can be eaten without cooking - at least enough for 4-5 days. The power can be really slow to return after the storm has passed. I can't imagine being so flippant about it as your neighbor was - it was loud, scary and life threatening.

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Do you think some people try to show off with fake nonchalance? It seems like it.

If she lives alone, she should only need one flashlight (especially if she tends to receive candles as gifts), and if she keeps a stocked pantry, filling some jars of water doesn't require a grocery run. I'd tell her to have fun getting ready as she sees fit! 🙂 It's her perfect right, IMO, to see whether there are any batteries left if she gets around to it, or twiddle her thumbs in the dark and reflect on her choices.

We haven't had an extended power outage since we got smartphones--I bet lack of charging is what would get to me. But I keep a bit of food, and just filled some water jars today in case Dorian comes to visit us when finished with y'all. For me the main issue is that I wouldn't be able to rely on anybody else to feed us even once it was safe to walk in the neighborhood.

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1 minute ago, Seasider too said:

 

We went through Charlie as you describe - except that we were prepared. We just didn’t have a generator, so grilled and scooped the day after. 

That - 2004 - was one heck of a season for central Florida. 

 

I'm glad you were prepared. We are so far inland, it was really only a few hours before the storm hit that we realized just how bad it was going to be. When I say "we" - I mean the whole area, not just our little family. There were no weather warnings for our area even one day ahead, IIRC. The first I remember hearing about it was on the 6pm news and it hit that night. Not again, though!

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How frustrating.

OTOH, maybe you can have a few extra small kits of lanterns, batteries, etc. (non-perishables) that you loan out with a hefty deposit (the value of what they're taking)--they get most of it back when they return the items in good condition. You might earn a little pocket change, especially if you are able to find things on clearance throughout the year or get secondhand sturdy items. 🙂 Or maybe you can put that little bit you keep aside for a charity and use it as a fundraiser. I'd be tempted! 

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9 minutes ago, Seasider too said:

 

We went through Charlie as you describe - except that we were prepared with canned and dry goods. We just didn’t have a generator, so grilled and scooped the day after. 

That - 2004 - was one heck of a season for central Florida. 

Yup. We ended up without power for 12 days. I was sleeping outside in a tent because it was cooler than the house. Finally only got power because my boss's husband was a contractor who sometimes worked with the power company and he got a truck to swing by. Turns out they problem was a single wire only effecting my house, so had he not done that it could have been a really really long time. (others got power a few days before us)

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We are far from hurricanes here. Just curious what you do to prepare for having enough water? Buy a gallon per person & pet per day for x days? Fill a bathtub? Fill 2L bottles with H2O and a little bleach? Or do you usually still have access to clean water?

 

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1 minute ago, Seasider too said:

Some would consider this a form of price gouging.

It would be neighborly to have some extra stuff to loan, though, if one were so inclined (and not overly annoyed by those who refuse to even minimally prepare).

Borrowing stuff over and over without returning it could be considered theft. 

As a deposit that will be mostly returned? Okay...I just thought of it as a compromise for giving away items because people don't even want to plan but need things.

I'm also picturing this as a "next hurricane" thing or even something to do seasonally before a threat is advised--just "Hey, if you hate hurricane shopping, I've got you covered, and you're helping out my favorite charity [or the college fund, etc.]." 

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15 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

We are far from hurricanes here. Just curious what you do to prepare for having enough water? Buy a gallon per person & pet per day for x days? Fill a bathtub? Fill 2L bottles with H2O and a little bleach? Or do you usually still have access to clean water?

 

Some stock up on bottled water only, others fill bathtubs (I always post on facebook reminding people with toddlers NOT to do that!), I buy a bit of bottled water and then fill up my gallon pitchers, the Gatorade style drink cooler, my big canning pot, etc. I also freeze water in tupperware to act as ice packs. 

Personally, I've only once not had drinkable water, and even then it was a precaution, but we did have water for flushing, etc. Other people though do often lose all running water. When we had water that was under a boil alert I boiled for cooking water and used a splash of bleach in my dishwashing rinse water and it was fine.

Personally, I do over prepare but it makes it so much less awful. I stock up on the needed things but also cans of cold brew coffee, I freeze tubes of yogurt and squeeze apple sauce for the kids so it keeps the cooler colder and is refreshing, I will cook up a pork butt for barebecue meat and then refreeze it, I stock up on paper plates/napkins/bowls/plastic silverware. I have LED lanterns that light up most of a room (safely - candles are a big fire hazard in the chaos of a storm) and have enough to light up the bathroom, main room, kitchen, and kids' room. They are so much less scared when the room has light versus using a flashlight. I have battery operated mini fans that don't do a lot but help a bit at least psychologically. And I will do all the wash and wash the dogs before hand. 

But invariably I am giving out cans of cold coffee, cold drinks to kids, meals, etc along with lanterns to people with kids who are afraid of the dark, etc. I don't really mind doing it, I will continue to do it, but when people are all "meh, why bother" it angers me. 

I'm also annoyed by people who lived here for decades and can't understand that ANYWHERE in the "cone" is where it could hit. Not just the center. That leaving one area of the cone to drive to stay in another coastal area of the cone is dumb. Almost every storm I'll here of someone driving INTO the storm because they did that. Go INLAND not to a different part of the coast - until it hits we have no way of knowing exactly where it will make landfall. Last one shifted course late at night right before landfall. 

And just because the last one didn't hit you, and you evacuated for "no reason' doesn't mean this one can't hit there. Sigh. 

But I do know I should just be very very grateful we can afford to prep as well as we do, and that for us this is an inconvenience, and why we have insurance. 

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1 hour ago, Seasider too said:

 

We went through Charlie as you describe - except that we were prepared with canned and dry goods. We just didn’t have a generator, so grilled and scooped the day after. 

That - 2004 - was one heck of a season for central Florida. 

That year was crazy. Charley, Frances, Jeanne. We weren't affected by Ivan but that was the 4th hurricane to hit the state in less than 2 months.

55 minutes ago, Ali in OR said:

We are far from hurricanes here. Just curious what you do to prepare for having enough water? Buy a gallon per person & pet per day for x days? Fill a bathtub? Fill 2L bottles with H2O and a little bleach? Or do you usually still have access to clean water?

 

What Katie said or in our case - We have a water cooler that uses 5 gallon jugs because we hate the taste of our city water. During a hurricane we get an extra couple of the 5 gallon bottles.

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This is our first hurricane.  We’re in Tampa, so I’m preparing but not freaking.  Maybe I should be more concerned than I am. I figure my husband’s doing enough of the worrying for the both of us.  One of us should be calm.  

I’ll have my coffee pre-made. We have water and food and all the things on the lists they put out. Gas tanks are full and will be topped off.  

I just need to get the school books together and up off the floor.  The school room is a disaster!  I’m not sure the hurricane didn’t already hit. 😉

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4 minutes ago, ikslo said:

This is our first hurricane.  We’re in Tampa, so I’m preparing but not freaking.  Maybe I should be more concerned than I am. I figure my husband’s doing enough of the worrying for the both of us.  One of us should be calm.  

I’ll have my coffee pre-made. We have water and food and all the things on the lists they put out. Gas tanks are full and will be topped off.  

I just need to get the school books together and up off the floor.  The school room is a disaster!  I’m not sure the hurricane didn’t already hit. 😉

Have some frozen meat to put on the grill, and cook a frozen pizza or order one shortly before the storm. Cold pizza keeps well and tastes good sitting in the dark listening to the storm. It's nicer than cold soup from a can 🙂

And LED lanterns are way better than flashlights, and battery operated fans are a huge help at night. Oh, and kids love glow sticks 🙂

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4 hours ago, Seasider too said:

 

We went through Charlie as you describe - except that we were prepared with canned and dry goods. We just didn’t have a generator, so grilled and scooped the day after. 

That - 2004 - was one heck of a season for central Florida. 

My youngest was born in the middle of that hurricane. It was wild. 

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2 minutes ago, Æthelthryth the Texan said:

I cannot even imagine that stress level!! I bet that is some story!

I think people outside of hurricane areas don’t get how long power outages can last and how much that effects. I think it was Issac we were without power for 3 weeks. There was no cell phone reception so it didn’t really matter if you had a battery charger or not. People expect cell service to work regardless- well guess again. 

We slept in our car at times just to get to be in AC. A whole house generator and a well are an investment here to protect against such. Infrastructure matters and not all cities have it! The fact that coastal cities can get power up within days is a testament to how amazing some of cities  infrastructure is. And when you’ve seen the Marines come in Blackhawks to come rescue your fellow townpersons off of rooftops mid storm you get a whole new level of respect for Mother Nature. And the Armed Forces, and Emergency workers for that matter. 

We are technically on vacation and dh has been dealing with hurricane meetings today for contingency plans. Hope you guys stay safe in FL. Seems like this will be a big one. Praying for you guys. This stuff is never fun. 

The worst of it was before the eye when we were watching all the tornado warnings over our house, where our other 3 kids were with my best friend, her hubby and her mom, and 10 day old baby. DD was born, I think dh stuck around for 15 min to make sure we were all ok, then jammed home while the eye was over us. I straight up passed out for 3 hours and the whole thing was over by the time I woke up. 

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My (young adult) son is right in the predicted landfall spot, in a designated storm surge evac zone. His father and stepmother aren’t very big on emergency preparedness. They once took my kid on vacation to an area that was being evacuated.  Needless to say, I am freaking.

I’m hoping ds will be the voice of reason, not that there’s much time left. He never fully adopted my emergency preparedness obsession (and I don’t live in a hurricane prone area, lol) but he has picked up the basic knowledge.

 

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Its another to say “eh, Mc Donald’s will be open eventually” and consider that good enough.

 

After Sandy, the nearest McDonald's opened, like, the next day - which is remarkable because they are RIGHT next to the water. Flood burgers, I'm telling you. There were lines and actual tantrums with people screaming because they didn't get their chicken nuggets (because the store was out). If you wanted your darn chicken nuggets so bad, you should've bought them before the storm!

Me, I was just glad we got power within two days.

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2 hours ago, Carrie12345 said:

My (young adult) son is right in the predicted landfall spot, in a designated storm surge evac zone. His father and stepmother aren’t very big on emergency preparedness. They once took my kid on vacation to an area that was being evacuated.  Needless to say, I am freaking.

I’m hoping ds will be the voice of reason, not that there’s much time left. He never fully adopted my emergency preparedness obsession (and I don’t live in a hurricane prone area, lol) but he has picked up the basic knowledge.

 

Depending on where he is I or another boardie would be happy to offer any help we can, or wisdom. I'm inland near Orlando but my parents are in Merritt Island (right by Cocoa) and I grew up in Palm Beach Gardens, a suburb of West Palm Beach and still have a bunch of really good friends in that area. In fact, my friend since kindergarten runs a facebook group for hurricane prep/help for Palm Beach and the Treasure Coast - he could maybe join that? And seriously, I have the kids of friends in that area that I can ask a favor of and they wouldn't think twice, anywhere from Jupiter to Boca, so let me know if there is anything I can do. They are all inland, as well, so I don't think any are evacuating (maybe the Boca one)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/164677474084749/

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I feel just a tad bit guilty that my first thought (and many since then) was to be glad my DD didn't choose UCF as her college because she'd be right in the middle of all this prep & I'd be freaking out. Because there are lots of kids that did choose colleges in Florida who are in the middle of this that are from other parts of the country who never deal with hurricanes and whose parents are freaking out.

Or, kids like one of my DD's suitemates whose family lives in the path, and they are freaking out from far away about their family's safety and well-being.

So I'm just praying that the hurricane veers off before hitting land. (So far, the forecasters have been off. Just doesn't give you a lot of confidence in the models.)

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6 minutes ago, Medicmom2.0 said:

She isn’t freaking out but was amazed at how blasé some of her neighbors are.

There's a weather dude, Denis Phillips, out of Tampa that people follow. He has this Rule #7 (and a corresponding beer if you drink, haha) that says not to freak out till he tells you to. So it may be her friends are following him. You can see his feeds on FB and he does live chats and stuff. He's who I want to follow to know whether my Florida people are safe, etc.

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9 minutes ago, Medicmom2.0 said:

Her friends are mostly military wives who have also been in Florida less than a month.  By blasé I mean they believe it will veer around them or be some heavy rainfall.

That's dumb. I've been following Denis Phillips on FB for several years (my mother moved down, etc.) and he's pretty somber right now. 

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41 minutes ago, RootAnn said:

I feel just a tad bit guilty that my first thought (and many since then) was to be glad my DD didn't choose UCF as her college because she'd be right in the middle of all this prep & I'd be freaking out. Because there are lots of kids that did choose colleges in Florida who are in the middle of this that are from other parts of the country who never deal with hurricanes and whose parents are freaking out.

Or, kids like one of my DD's suitemates whose family lives in the path, and they are freaking out from far away about their family's safety and well-being.

So I'm just praying that the hurricane veers off before hitting land. (So far, the forecasters have been off. Just doesn't give you a lot of confidence in the models.)

Not really. They've been saying for days that it would probably hit the east coast of Florida. And, it will probably hit the east coast of Florida. The problem is that people think that the little H in the center of the "cone" is where the meteorologists are saying it will hit. But that's not the way it works - they are saying ANYONE in that cone could be hit. And that cone hasn't changed a whole lot - it's been covering all of Florida for days I'm pretty sure. Now, it did veer around the islands but that was one of the possible paths, just not the one that was best for Florida, lol. 

But I think people have an impression that they are predicting things in a much more narrow way than they really are. Basically, right now, the only real prediction is "somewhere between the keys and Southeast GA - probably". It will wobble around all within that possible hit area, and we won't know until right before it hits if it will be Miami vs Jacksonville versus skirting the coast, etc. Anyone in Florida or southeast georgia is in the possible line of fire. 

But people look at the narrow line down the middle and think if that isn't aiming at them 4 days out they are safe. Or, they see they are in the path and then drive to some other part of the coast and when it shifts they get hit there. 

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It seems strange to me that my brother's area does not have school closures today. They are predicting landfall on Monday right? Even though they are not in the center of the "cone" they are still in the larger swath of coverage.  That's not a lot of time to prep if you work full time at school. 

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yeah, some school districts are doing half days or early dismissal today, but two full days to prep on the weekend is actually more than people often get. If it hits on a thursday people get Wednesday off, maybe. Or maybe a half day tuesday. But they don't expect to have monday, tues, wednesday off for a Thursday hurricane.

 

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My 19 yo ds is in Tampa. We are 500 miles away where hurricanes aren’t a thing. I am not freaking out but reminding him to have supplies and be smart. 

This is his second year in school there and I am really feeling for parents from far away (like we are) who just dropped their freshman off last week and now are watching this.  I feel guilty even worrying when the east coast is set to be hit so hard and he is across the state. I do follow a local Tampa weather guy that seems to be calm and informative and that is more helpful than national news. 

We had a hard enough adjustment last year when he went so far off to college to the land of hurricanes (and gators...lol). I would have really been a wreck last year to drop him off and have this a week later. So I really feel for all those parents. (And of course everyone else...just super sympathetic to the parents of college kids who have never been through this).

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37 minutes ago, teachermom2834 said:

My 19 yo ds is in Tampa. We are 500 miles away where hurricanes aren’t a thing. I am not freaking out but reminding him to have supplies and be smart. 

This is his second year in school there and I am really feeling for parents from far away (like we are) who just dropped their freshman off last week and now are watching this.  I feel guilty even worrying when the east coast is set to be hit so hard and he is across the state. I do follow a local Tampa weather guy that seems to be calm and informative and that is more helpful than national news. 

We had a hard enough adjustment last year when he went so far off to college to the land of hurricanes (and gators...lol). I would have really been a wreck last year to drop him off and have this a week later. So I really feel for all those parents. (And of course everyone else...just super sympathetic to the parents of college kids who have never been through this).

 

But last year, Irma was heading straight for him! 😶 We have family in all parts of Florida and these last few years have been Crazyville. So many large, slow-moving hurricanes!

Hurricane season coinciding with the beginning of the school year stinks. 😕

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17 minutes ago, easypeasy said:

 

But last year, Irma was heading straight for him! 😶 We have family in all parts of Florida and these last few years have been Crazyville. So many large, slow-moving hurricanes!

Hurricane season coinciding with the beginning of the school year stinks. 😕

 

Yes, my brother was just saying this. They have been talking about getting hurricane shutters or the impact glass windows for years and he is finally said that he has had it and after this one he is going to buy some. He's tired of putting up plywood. 

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36 minutes ago, easypeasy said:

 

But last year, Irma was heading straight for him! 😶 We have family in all parts of Florida and these last few years have been Crazyville. So many large, slow-moving hurricanes!

Hurricane season coinciding with the beginning of the school year stinks. 😕

I think Irma was two years ago maybe ???? I do know that last year we never had any weather concerns. I had expressed concern about hurricanes to someone from Tampa who told me “Tampa only gets hit about once a decade and they got hit last year so he shouldn’t see one again before he graduates”. 

My father is actually down there visiting (flies back Sunday) so he is helping make sure ds is ready. He just texted me that he bought him a lantern and batteries. 

Lots of time to prepare with slow moving storm but right now it feels like lots of time to worry and wait. 

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21 hours ago, Ali in OR said:

We are far from hurricanes here. Just curious what you do to prepare for having enough water? Buy a gallon per person & pet per day for x days? Fill a bathtub? Fill 2L bottles with H2O and a little bleach? Or do you usually still have access to clean water?

 

 

A little late to answer this, but my family always bought bottled water to drink and filled bathtubs to be sure there would be enough water to flush toilets for several days.

Some areas in North Central Florida are already flooded due to unusually heavy summer rains this year, so in some areas people are already under a boil/bleach/bottled order.  Generally flooding messes with having clean water.

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2 hours ago, teachermom2834 said:

 I had expressed concern about hurricanes to someone from Tampa who told me “Tampa only gets hit about once a decade and they got hit last year so he shouldn’t see one again before he graduates”.

Does he think that if he flips a coin and it's heads, the next one should be tails? Not how it works, man.

I hope this one isn't too bad, but it looks like it'll be bad news for somebody.

 

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50 minutes ago, Katy said:

 

A little late to answer this, but my family always bought bottled water to drink and filled bathtubs to be sure there would be enough water to flush toilets for several days.

Some areas in North Central Florida are already flooded due to unusually heavy summer rains this year, so in some areas people are already under a boil/bleach/bottled order.  Generally flooding messes with having clean water.

And sometimes being able to flush. Not to be overly gross, but a real concern when sewers begin to overflow.

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9 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

I was employed at McDonald’s when Katrina hit. Our store did reopen not too long after the storm... but it was days or weeks. Now Waffle House? Look for them. They hardly ever close. 

 

Yes, and the Waffle House Index is a real thing. It came from Craig Fugate when he was Florida's emergency management director during the 2004 hurricanes. It was after Hurricane Charley that he discovered Waffle House stayed open and the Waffle House Index was born. 

https://www.newsweek.com/craig-fugate-explains-waffle-house-index-1120655

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Craig_Fugate#Waffle_House_Index

 

7 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Depending on where he is I or another boardie would be happy to offer any help we can, or wisdom. I'm inland near Orlando but my parents are in Merritt Island (right by Cocoa) and I grew up in Palm Beach Gardens, a suburb of West Palm Beach and still have a bunch of really good friends in that area. In fact, my friend since kindergarten runs a facebook group for hurricane prep/help for Palm Beach and the Treasure Coast - he could maybe join that? And seriously, I have the kids of friends in that area that I can ask a favor of and they wouldn't think twice, anywhere from Jupiter to Boca, so let me know if there is anything I can do. They are all inland, as well, so I don't think any are evacuating (maybe the Boca one)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/164677474084749/

Absolutely yes. I'm in Brevard County near Kennedy Space Center. Wherever he is, there's likely a facebook group for hurricane prep/help like the one linked above. I know young people don't use facebook but in this case he should make an exception. 

6 hours ago, RootAnn said:

 

(So far, the forecasters have been off. Just doesn't give you a lot of confidence in the models.)

No, it's been going where they said it would. Each change in the track was still inside the cone. 

5 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

Not really. They've been saying for days that it would probably hit the east coast of Florida. And, it will probably hit the east coast of Florida. The problem is that people think that the little H in the center of the "cone" is where the meteorologists are saying it will hit. But that's not the way it works - they are saying ANYONE in that cone could be hit. And that cone hasn't changed a whole lot - it's been covering all of Florida for days I'm pretty sure. Now, it did veer around the islands but that was one of the possible paths, just not the one that was best for Florida, lol. 

But I think people have an impression that they are predicting things in a much more narrow way than they really are. Basically, right now, the only real prediction is "somewhere between the keys and Southeast GA - probably". It will wobble around all within that possible hit area, and we won't know until right before it hits if it will be Miami vs Jacksonville versus skirting the coast, etc. Anyone in Florida or southeast georgia is in the possible line of fire. 

But people look at the narrow line down the middle and think if that isn't aiming at them 4 days out they are safe. Or, they see they are in the path and then drive to some other part of the coast and when it shifts they get hit there. 

Yes to all of the above. Also, forecasting has improved in the last 15-20 years and keeps getting better. Just last year the cone narrowed even more due to improved software. 

At this link you can see the projection for several hurricanes compared to where they made landfall. All are within the projection.
https://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/weather/hurricane/fl-ne-hurricane-dorian-trust-the-forecast-cone-20190829-c555ufmjmzeufouqk6tmiutr4u-story.html

This one talks about improvements in forecasting where a storm will make landfall.
https://www.forbes.com/sites/marshallshepherd/2015/08/14/10-years-later-did-we-learn-anything-from-hurricane-katrina/#7835e09711bb

Compare the forecast cone of Katrina in 2005 to what it would look like today. I both cases it made landfall within the projected cone but Katrina today would have a much smaller cone. 

10 Years Later: Forecast Improvements -- Hurricane Katrina Cone of Uncertainty, 2005 vs. Today

 

 

3 hours ago, cintinative said:

 

Yes, my brother was just saying this. They have been talking about getting hurricane shutters or the impact glass windows for years and he is finally said that he has had it and after this one he is going to buy some. He's tired of putting up plywood. 

We have corrugated metal but it does get harder to put up each time, since dh and I are both getting older. Fortunately we have 2 adult sons to help, one still living at home. They won't always be here or able to help. I have a friend who got tired of evacuating (though honestly she only left because of fear, not real need to evacuate) and they had their house completely redone. They replaced their sliding glass door and added automatic hurricane shutters to their other windows and are preparing to hunker down this time.

58 minutes ago, Katy said:

 

 

Some areas in North Central Florida are already flooded due to unusually heavy summer rains this year, so in some areas people are already under a boil/bleach/bottled order.  Generally flooding messes with having clean water.

Yes, summer is normally our rainy season but this summer has been exceptionally wet. Some low lying areas have already flooded or come close to flooding. This very slow, very wet hurricane is going to be a big problem on that front. 

Edited by Lady Florida.
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I totally agree. It is so frustrating! We are typically not hyper-prepared because we have a generator (we DO get lots of gas), and almost always have plenty of groceries, so I'm able to cook and stuff. I do typically get at least SOME water in case water goes out, but we have a Berkey filter, so if there's a boil advisory or something, I can just run it through the Berkey.

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I wish I would have been saving the computer models all along. (I pay no attention to the "cone" model.) There used to be one that said it would completely miss Florida. Now there are three. I'm hoping for that (and not hit any further north either).

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I have a friend on the coast who never evacuates, owns an RV now, and constantly posts about storm updates and her fear. I am so.freaking.over it. I am deeply concerned about those who cannot leave and find themselves in harms way. I’ve had it up to here with folks who choose to ride it out (so obviously they think risking their three kids’ lives is reasonable) and want sympathy. They’ve been LUCKY so far.

Edited by Sneezyone
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1 hour ago, heartlikealion said:

Whenever I would hear generators running in the neighborhood I thought they were SO LOUD. I cannot imagine living in a home with one running. Is it loud to you? Granted I do tend to be more sensitive to sound than others (light sleeper). This is also something I saw as a huge flaw in The Walking Dead early seasons lol. I'm like ok Hershel, like your generator won't attract zombies. 

Our area is prone to power outages and, yes, generators can be very loud! A lot of people around here have automatic wired-in generators which are a lot quieter than the portables, but it also depends on the acoustics of each spot.  In our neighborhood, everyone else’s sounds like a low hum. In our yard, it doesn’t sound too much worse (from inside) than my oscillating fan or wall air conditioner. But we’re in a wooded area with acre+ lots.  My hometown, with lots of open area and 1/10 acre lots would probably be a nightmare. But still worth it!

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