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heartlikealion

Huge ICE raid in my state

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8 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

It’s not easy to convey in words. It’s a feeling. You can help someone and feel used in one situation and do the same in another and not feel used. 

I could be holding onto old thoughts/feelings from my interactions with this parish. Like my balloon pump and tape walked off at a Hispanic event (I had them in a crate) and when I told my boss and her daughter during the event they essentially shrugged. No one cared. She also spoke down to me at my job at times. How you treat people can affect morale. They could be running this resource center for years. I hope my experiences are the exception because they definitely need local volunteers to return. Some I met were from out of state and won’t be here long. 

Yes, I care about the kids and it breaks my heart to hear that a dad or mom is in jail. But there is a part of me annoyed with the parents because I don’t know if fleeing was their only viable/best option. This feeling may pass. But can the community compensate for lack of jobs for potentially years? A community that isn’t that well off to begin with. These are my scrambled thoughts. 

I still don't understand...the point was for you to be used. And if fleeing wasn't their best option, they wouldn't have done it. 

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(( @heartlikealion )) thank you for trying.

For trying to better understand the circumstances, for trying to figure out some way to help people who are clearly suffering, for trying to sort through and articulate your thoughts.

Trying to make a difference, even a very small difference, is very often not particularly gratifying in the moment. It takes a while to find the right entry point, something that fits our disposition and style; caring for children may not be the best entry point for you. There are many, many other ways; I hope you hang in and find one that works for you.

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That's not necessarily true, people can make bad decisions based on either bad information or misjudgment.  I'm not saying that's the case here, as of course I don't know any of these people, but it's not like everyone who ever made a significant decision made the right one.

That said, in the US we're a lot richer than our neighbors to the south.  To the extent that we allow or encourage people to move from a lower economic quality of life to a higher one, it makes sense that they will do so and that it is in their self-interest.

That doesn't necessarily mean it's either in our self-interest or required of us morally even though it isn't in our self-interest.  But certainly if you're super poor, and you can manage a way to enter and stay indefinitely in a country where you will be, comparatively speaking, rich, there's natural pressure to do so.  It's part of the consequence of the global wealth disparity, imo.

Re: volunteering - I can understand being concerned first about your own community, especially if you feel like most people in your community are living on the edge of poverty and may not have a lot of resources to share.  I can also understand volunteering for a cause you believe in but also really wanting to do certain things within that volunteer work - I think it was NightElf who started volunteering with the Humane Society and felt like she had gotten shuffled off at first to a job she didn't prefer (I think it was washing kennels?) and IIRC she requested a transfer to taking care of the cats and eventually I think helping in the thrift store.  Especially if you feel somewhat overwhelmed at home by your own kids and are anticipating helping out by doing something that gets you away from kids for a couple of hours, it would be disappointing to be shuffled off to take care of kids!

All of that said, I think generally if you volunteer you're kind of stuck doing what they have left for you to do when you get there.  My DD's preschool teacher used to say (at snack time), "You get what you get and you don't throw a fit." I also have volunteered or donated in the past to programs I found out were being used responsibly by some people and irresponsibly by others (although I doubt that is the case here).  That can feel yucky, depending on the degree of the abuse.  I no longer ever donate to Santa boxes or Christmas tree gift requests for needy kids, for example - I found out that my SIL's SILs (who, ironically, were all illegal immigrants from Mexico) all signed up for these things every year using falsified data about their household income, then sold the stuff for cash or traded it.  So I lost faith in that charity, although I'm sure many people, maybe most, really do need the gifts.  Personal experience can really color your feeling about something even if it's not like a scientific poll or even necessarily an accurate reflection of the thing as a whole.

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7 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

I still don't understand...the point was for you to be used. And if fleeing wasn't their best option, they wouldn't have done it. 

As another poster said, we don’t know that. Just like sometimes people in the states move for greener pastures. It may not always end up being greener. 

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7 hours ago, moonflower said:

That's not necessarily true, people can make bad decisions based on either bad information or misjudgment.  I'm not saying that's the case here, as of course I don't know any of these people, but it's not like everyone who ever made a significant decision made the right one.

That said, in the US we're a lot richer than our neighbors to the south.  To the extent that we allow or encourage people to move from a lower economic quality of life to a higher one, it makes sense that they will do so and that it is in their self-interest.

That doesn't necessarily mean it's either in our self-interest or required of us morally even though it isn't in our self-interest.  But certainly if you're super poor, and you can manage a way to enter and stay indefinitely in a country where you will be, comparatively speaking, rich, there's natural pressure to do so.  It's part of the consequence of the global wealth disparity, imo.

Re: volunteering - I can understand being concerned first about your own community, especially if you feel like most people in your community are living on the edge of poverty and may not have a lot of resources to share.  I can also understand volunteering for a cause you believe in but also really wanting to do certain things within that volunteer work - I think it was NightElf who started volunteering with the Humane Society and felt like she had gotten shuffled off at first to a job she didn't prefer (I think it was washing kennels?) and IIRC she requested a transfer to taking care of the cats and eventually I think helping in the thrift store.  Especially if you feel somewhat overwhelmed at home by your own kids and are anticipating helping out by doing something that gets you away from kids for a couple of hours, it would be disappointing to be shuffled off to take care of kids!

All of that said, I think generally if you volunteer you're kind of stuck doing what they have left for you to do when you get there.  My DD's preschool teacher used to say (at snack time), "You get what you get and you don't throw a fit." I also have volunteered or donated in the past to programs I found out were being used responsibly by some people and irresponsibly by others (although I doubt that is the case here).  That can feel yucky, depending on the degree of the abuse.  I no longer ever donate to Santa boxes or Christmas tree gift requests for needy kids, for example - I found out that my SIL's SILs (who, ironically, were all illegal immigrants from Mexico) all signed up for these things every year using falsified data about their household income, then sold the stuff for cash or traded it.  So I lost faith in that charity, although I'm sure many people, maybe most, really do need the gifts.  Personal experience can really color your feeling about something even if it's not like a scientific poll or even necessarily an accurate reflection of the thing as a whole.

The giving tree at the affluent parish is always full of the Hispanic families. Not just the children. I do not know how people will feel if the families listed (or some) are proven here illegally. 

Yes, you get what you get makes sense. I just didn’t like that the slots were listed in 3 hr increments. I don’t like surprises but now I know what to expect. And I would probably ignore the slots and just show up. 

At any rate this thread has made me take a deeper look at things. 

 

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23 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

As another poster said, we don’t know that. Just like sometimes people in the states move for greener pastures. It may not always end up being greener. 

Ok, I should have said they thought it was their best option.They may end up wrong, but they felt at the time it was the best decision.

15 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

The giving tree at the affluent parish is always full of the Hispanic families. Not just the children. I do not know how people will feel if the families listed (or some) are proven here illegally. 

 

That makes me so sad, that someone might resent having gifted a Christmas present to a person in need just because of their citizenship. Jesus was pretty clear that nationality didn't matter, what mattered was how we treated people - people from anywhere. 

There is some amazing writing and information out there from the Catholic Church on this subject, it might be helpful for you? 

And for what it is worth, I get being annoyed at it running long when you have responsibilities at home. But please don't let that effect how you feel towards the immigrants and their kids. Also, I have HUGE respect for you getting out there and doing the work even while trying to figure out how you feel about it. So many won't ever do that, so please know I'm not criticizing you. You are doing the right thing even while struggling to understand it all, and that is the very best any of us can do. 

https://www.catholicnews.com/services/englishnews/2019/welcome-christ-present-in-migrants-and-refugees-pope-urges.cfm

This one is about "why don't they come here legally?" http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/immigration/whydonttheycomeherelegally.cfm

This video is pretty good as to why this is a religious issue. 

 

 

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One helpful thing for me has been to view my giving and serving as something I do because of my relationship with Christ. I do it as a form of worship—literally loving my neighbor and treating other people as my brother or sister. It doesn’t really matter how that gift is received or whether the person was “worthy” of it. We are all “unworthy”—iykwim. 

 

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Personally, I also see a difference between volunteering within an organization of which you are a member and benefit from (e.g. homeschool co-op, teaching a Sunday School at your church, etc.) and volunteering where you are only there to meet the needs and be of service to others, as in the situation under discussion. While it’s possible to have a negative experience in both situations, I think in the latter it helps keep things in perspective if the focus is almost solely on those being served/helped, although I realize that is sometimes easier said than done.

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I just don’t think 3 hr slots (for any service) is necessarily doable for the average volunteer. They need volunteers Monday-Saturday. I’m gently suggesting they allow shorter slots. But right now they are trying to direct people to the sign up link. I suppose in the comment section you could say, “can only stay 1 hr” or whatever.

I asked if my friend could babysit... she offered when we spoke... and I asked the church about the training required. At least one trained person needs to be with them. I don’t know if the others that were in and out of the room were trained. Our Protection of Children trainings are through the church and some parishes are more strict than others. For example, I’m one of the limited number of people that can sell tickets at an annual festival we have at one church because kids come up to the booth.  I originally got training for VBS in the past. I told another Catholic at this year’s VBS in another town and they said no way we have everyone at our festival trained. But I don’t know what kind of booths they have. I think they are only strict at certain booths for ours.

I think they will need to gather up a list of people and offer more training sessions. Those trained are also background checked though so I guess that comes out of parish funds. Not sure how that would be handled in this type scenario. Eucharistic ministers may be trained for interactions with children, but they may not be. It’s a bit of a gray area. 

I did speak to one community member that came by Friday saying she didn’t know what she could do and I said she’d have to ask the person who was in charge who was tied up in her office speaking to Hispanic parishioners. Or likely parishioners. I felt bad that she came to help and here we are saying we need volunteers. I may start directing people to the link but it seems largely meaningless as far as duties. I think they are updating it, though. Maybe the format will change. There isn’t really a contact email or number. Maybe the main name on the sign up but I’m not sure you can click it to email. I have personal cell numbers for some but not everyone will be able to answer questions. 

One of the few things I’m good at is organizing information and distributing it. I have connections to a few different parishes. If they could say yes we’re still collecting x, y, z I could make a flyer with pictures and include what grocery stores carry it and possibly what aisle. But it sounds like they don’t even have space right now. 

Edited by heartlikealion

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They have just updated the weekly needs/sign up list and told us to feel free to share. They have added a slot for homework helpers and asked groups to volunteer to provide meals (they stated approx numbers for each meal. Breakfast needing to feed the least amount of people). I am glad to see they are updating as they go. 

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2 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

I just don’t think 3 hr slots (for any service) is necessarily doable for the average volunteer. They need volunteers Monday-Saturday. I’m gently suggesting they allow shorter slots. But right now they are trying to direct people to the sign up link. I suppose in the comment section you could say, “can only stay 1 hr” or whatever.

I asked if my friend could babysit... she offered when we spoke... and I asked the church about the training required. At least one trained person needs to be with them. I don’t know if the others that were in and out of the room were trained. Our Protection of Children trainings are through the church and some parishes are more strict than others. For example, I’m one of the limited number of people that can sell tickets at an annual festival we have at one church because kids come up to the booth.  I originally got training for VBS in the past. I told another Catholic at this year’s VBS in another town and they said no way we have everyone at our festival trained. But I don’t know what kind of booths they have. I think they are only strict at certain booths for ours.

I think they will need to gather up a list of people and offer more training sessions. Those trained are also background checked though so I guess that comes out of parish funds. Not sure how that would be handled in this type scenario. Eucharistic ministers may be trained for interactions with children, but they may not be. It’s a bit of a gray area. 

I did speak to one community member that came by Friday saying she didn’t know what she could do and I said she’d have to ask the person who was in charge who was tied up in her office speaking to Hispanic parishioners. Or likely parishioners. I felt bad that she came to help and here we are saying we need volunteers. I may start directing people to the link but it seems largely meaningless as far as duties. I think they are updating it, though. Maybe the format will change. There isn’t really a contact email or number. Maybe the main name on the sign up but I’m not sure you can click it to email. I have personal cell numbers for some but not everyone will be able to answer questions. 

One of the few things I’m good at is organizing information and distributing it. I have connections to a few different parishes. If they could say yes we’re still collecting x, y, z I could make a flyer with pictures and include what grocery stores carry it and possibly what aisle. But it sounds like they don’t even have space right now. 

 

As a former volunteer coordinator, I can tell you that shorter shifts may be helpful for you as a volunteer but they are very disruptive for the organizations that need the help. Every time a new shift/group comes in, they have to be trained and/or oriented to their assigned task. For the same reason the Red Cross often asks for money that can be directed where needed, and not for ‘stuff’ to simply show up, it’s reasonable for people to do the same...use the sign up link, talk to someone tangentially related to a leader (who may be swamped), etc. and get in/pitch in wherever help is needed. I also don’t understand why the possible ethnicity of the parishioners the person may/may not have been talking to was relevant? I am so very confused. It just does not sound like your heart was in this to serve but to receive something. What that something is isn’t clear to me and isn’t really for me to know. I do think YOU should know what that ‘thing’ is though to better align your goals and expectations.

Edited by Sneezyone
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56 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

As a former volunteer coordinator, I can tell you that shorter shifts may be helpful for you as a volunteer but they are very disruptive for the organizations that need the help. Every time a new shift/group comes in, they have to be trained and/or oriented to their assigned task. For the same reason the Red Cross often asks for money that can be directed where needed, and not for ‘stuff’ to simply show up, it’s reasonable for people to do the same...use the sign up link, talk to someone tangentially related to a leader (who may be swamped), etc. and get in/pitch in wherever help is needed. I also don’t understand why the possible ethnicity of the parishioners the person may/may not have been talking to was relevant? I am so very confused. It just does not sound like your heart was in this to serve but to receive something. What that something is isn’t clear to me and isn’t really for me to know. I do think YOU should know what that ‘thing’ is though to better align your goals and expectations.

I said “Hispanic parishioners” for brevity. It was quicker than, “people affected by the raids.” My mother is Mexican-American. My grandparents on her side were bilingual. A lot of culture and language didn’t get passed down to me. I assure you I meant no offense by specifying who was in the room. 

Yes, I know I sound like an awful person. Message was received loud and clear several posts back. 

Edited by heartlikealion
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11 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

I said “Hispanic parishioners” for brevity. It was quicker than, “people affected by the raids.” My mother is Mexican-American. My grandparents were bilingual. A lot of culture and language did t get passed down to me. I assure you I meant no offense by specifying who was in the room. 

Yes, I know I sound like an awful person. Message was received loud and clear several posts back. 

 

Its not about being ‘awful’ to me or anyone else but being clear and honest with yourself. I believe in manifestation and I’m not sure whether you’re manifesting what you intend or not. Maybe you feel convicted, I dunno, but all I’ve done is asked you to clarify your purpose.

Edited by Sneezyone
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9 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

Its not about being ‘awful’ to me or anyone else but being clear and honest with yourself. I believe in manifestation and I’m not sure whether you’re manifesting what you intend or not. Maybe you feel convicted, I dunno, but all I’ve done is asked you to clarify your purpose.

Didn’t I answer that a few posts back, though? I went to help (to elaborate I will say I went partly out of guilt/obligation... I saw hardly any names on the sign up link) and partly to gather information so I could better inform those out of the loop like I was. My tiny parish, where I am registered, does not get any of the info. They are a mission church which is a sister church to a church in the opposite direction from the one nearest me with a resource center. The religious sisters said talk to us more when you get more info. 

Of course it’s easier for coordinators to have longer shifts scheduled. That’s not lost on me. But you want someone there 2-5pm, 5-8 pm etc? Who are these volunteers? Are these shifts sustainable? Are these people retired? Have a weekday off? Neighbors of the church? Have they completed the Protection of Children training? These are my thoughts. No, it’s never going to be perfect. But I think a 2 hr shift may be more doable for volunteers. I personally live over 30 min away from the resource center. I can’t speak for others. 

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48 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

Didn’t I answer that a few posts back, though? I went to help (to elaborate I will say I went partly out of guilt/obligation... I saw hardly any names on the sign up link) and partly to gather information so I could better inform those out of the loop like I was. My tiny parish, where I am registered, does not get any of the info. They are a mission church which is a sister church to a church in the opposite direction from the one nearest me with a resource center. The religious sisters said talk to us more when you get more info. 

Of course it’s easier for coordinators to have longer shifts scheduled. That’s not lost on me. But you want someone there 2-5pm, 5-8 pm etc? Who are these volunteers? Are these shifts sustainable? Are these people retired? Have a weekday off? Neighbors of the church? Have they completed the Protection of Children training? These are my thoughts. No, it’s never going to be perfect. But I think a 2 hr shift may be more doable for volunteers. I personally live over 30 min away from the resource center. I can’t speak for others. 

 

Ah. That makes more sense. Thanks. I dunno. Maybe you weren’t familiar with the other people b/c they were part of different congregations tho? I confess my own bias leans toward skepticism when ppl. want an organization to find ways for them to do what they want/like to do vs. what the organization might actually need. Some roles never get filled that way. At the nonprofit where I worked, regulars sustained our volunteer efforts and service programs and they were typically there for several hours at a time.  We had some folks come every week, others once a month. We had a 2 hr. ask for clerical tasks but 3-4 hours for major events and client services. News reports and annual fundraisers often brought out one time donors but that kind of support isn’t what kept things moving day to day. Some regular volunteers were retired. Some of them had someone they love/care about that was affected so they took time away from work. It was always difficult for me to both find meaningful work when there was a big influx and convert them into regular volunteers which is what we really needed. All of our volunteers were trained. That was my job.

Edited by Sneezyone

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52 minutes ago, Sneezyone said:

 

Ah. That makes more sense. Thanks. I dunno. Maybe you weren’t familiar with the other people b/c they were part of different congregations tho? I confess my own bias leans toward skepticism when ppl. want an organization to find ways for them to do what they want/like to do vs. what the organization might actually need. Some roles never get filled that way. At the nonprofit where I worked, regulars sustained our volunteer efforts and service programs and they were typically there for several hours at a time.  We had some folks come every week, others once a month. We had a 2 hr. ask for clerical tasks but 3-4 hours for major events and client services. News reports and annual fundraisers often brought out one time donors but that kind of support isn’t what kept things moving day to day. Some regular volunteers were retired. Some of them had someone they love/care about that was affected so they took time away from work. It was always difficult for me to both find meaningful work when there was a big influx and convert them into regular volunteers which is what we really needed. All of our volunteers were trained. That was my job.

Sorry, I meant people I didn’t see face-to-face. Who are these hypothetical people volunteering the unclaimed (or few claimed) shifts? If they can’t fill them now, they may have better luck asking for less. 

While I was there we had a couple people from out of state. One was about to go back. The other is here for now but I’m sure short term. They are from advocate groups... informing people of their rights and stuff. 

Then I saw a few people from Catholic Charities coming to check in. CC is located in another city. I don’t know what they did or if they will be back. I met a counselor that attends a parish in another town. Her commute is shorter than mine but she felt like she wasn’t able to help as her services require Spanish and she does not speak Spanish. She was there with a bilingual counselor and let them take over. The woman that arrived before I left is employed by the neighbor sister church. She’s there a lot right now and was the one that told me they really need sitters. I met another woman who arrived as I was leaving. She said she lives nearby and asked what the Church needed. They said to-go boxes and her family has a local business so she dropped off boxes. I don’t know if she stayed. The person in charge is employed by the church. I’m not saying the employees are getting any extra compensation for coming to the resource center, though. I doubt it. I saw two other people that I don’t know their exact role but one looked like a lawyer possibly (dressed up professionally) and another may have been a parishioner I haven’t met before as I seldom attend the Spanish service and she did not speak English.

No, I don’t want the organization to change for me specifically. I’m just trying to be practical. I don’t see people flocking to pick up those shifts. My hunch is the hours or length of hours. I was told over 200 people were emailed that link. Initially you had to fill out a form and turn in at the church to get the link. I don’t know if that figure was including reshares of the link.

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This is the broader link if anyone feels compelled to donate: https://catholiccharitiesjackson.org/ice-raids-in-morton

the url says Morton but I am told that’s the generic link for all the affected areas. 

The volunteer list on Catholic Charities site I suspect is for people at the CC headquarters, not one of the parish sites. We are told clothing is not being accepted but inside our nearest resource center there was a sign that said clothing lol I have no idea. I think that they aren’t really taking it now. The CC site said mainly size 0-6 diapers but the local list needed bigger sizes more. 

Edited by heartlikealion

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On 8/8/2019 at 5:33 AM, Quill said:

I don’t know...if employers hang for hiring illegal immigrants it makes it that much more difficult for non-citizens to gain any employment. Same with housing - if landlords could get jailed or whatever for housing an illegal immigrant, it makes them more wary of renting to non-citizens, which makes it harder for illegal immigrants to integrate into society productively. So...I don’t know.

But I do know some employers do exploit non-citizens because they have no recourse. So yes, that is a problem too. 

 

It's not illegal to rent to non-citizens.  It is illegal to hire people who don't have the legal status to work and it's often done hand in hand with other crimes- failing to pay payroll taxes, wage theft, non-compliance with overtime and other employment laws.  

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On 8/16/2019 at 12:49 PM, heartlikealion said:

Haven't read the article yet, but someone on my friend's list told me about their local area and a raid in the past. The IRS got involved for the CEO or whatever later. I don't know how soon the owners will be addressed. But if I recall correctly, the punishment was financial... I don't think they went to jail??

 

The penalty for non-payment of payroll taxes is higher than the penalty for hiring an undocumented worker.  Most employers are not or investigated. If it is determined that there was a persistent pattern of hiring undocumented workers, the fine is $3000 per worker hired and possibly (rarely to basically never) 6 months in jail.  When the penalty for the infraction has a low chance of being levied and the max penalty pales in comparison to the amount the employers save on wages and benefits, people will keep doing it.  There's also a legit shortage of workers for these jobs (even when higher wages and benefits are offered) in some states so employers might not see much of a choice but to flaunt the law.  

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I think it is important to keep in mind that this happened just recently and therefore is not a long term project that people have had time to work out the details. Many projects initially look a mess as people figure things out. 

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5 hours ago, Ktgrok said:

I think it is important to keep in mind that this happened just recently and therefore is not a long term project that people have had time to work out the details. Many projects initially look a mess as people figure things out. 

Yes, I know. And the babysitting may not be in need the full year (or however long the resource center exists). But they did say on facebook that the church is creating a temporary babysitting ministry. I don't know what their definition of temporary is. Perhaps the babysitting need is only there in the very beginning as parents need to attend meetings or whatever. But right now I know that people don't necessarily feel safe at their homes so will probably deliberately spend more time at the resource center.

The affluent church is bigger and has been "flooded with requests" from volunteers. Yet, the sign up sheet was mostly blank. That is why I was jumping to the conclusion the hours of operation or the hours of shifts might not be doable for many people.

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1 hour ago, heartlikealion said:

Yes, I know. And the babysitting may not be in need the full year (or however long the resource center exists). But they did say on facebook that the church is creating a temporary babysitting ministry. I don't know what their definition of temporary is. Perhaps the babysitting need is only there in the very beginning as parents need to attend meetings or whatever. But right now I know that people don't necessarily feel safe at their homes so will probably deliberately spend more time at the resource center.

The affluent church is bigger and has been "flooded with requests" from volunteers. Yet, the sign up sheet was mostly blank. That is why I was jumping to the conclusion the hours of operation or the hours of shifts might not be doable for many people.

If so they will figure it out over time. This is a very different situation than a lot they have dealt with so may take a while for everything to shake loose. Try to focus on the good you did, the help you and others provided, rather than the hiccups in how this is being run. Since you can't control that stuff, focus on the good you did. 

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17 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

If so they will figure it out over time. This is a very different situation than a lot they have dealt with so may take a while for everything to shake loose. Try to focus on the good you did, the help you and others provided, rather than the hiccups in how this is being run. Since you can't control that stuff, focus on the good you did. 

I only said something once aloud about the potential hour obstacle. Most of what I’ve said is strictly here. I have been focusing on other ways I could assist or pass info along. They have posted needs for meals but it’s unclear if the meals should be dropped off or prepared in the kitchen (I can’t picture too many people in the kitchen). I asked about food ideas... American food or perhaps something more traditional? Not everyone is Mexican. I know I could be overthinking it but sometimes it’s good to ask questions so you don’t waste everyone’s time in another way. My mom had no ideas beyond sweet Mexican bread. And she’s hypoglycemic so naturally we think about a need for protein which things like sweets don’t provide. Mexican bread is a specialty item to me. Probably not cheap and only found in Spanish grocery stores. /shrug. I’ve had it before but I was in California. 

I texted a few people for ideas. One was raised in Mexico. Have not heard back. In fact I get the vibe she wants nothing to do with this (I did not ask her to volunteer). She’s a homeschooler and actually teaches Spanish. She has not said a word about the raids online or off. 

You guys don’t have to worry. I’ll be careful what I say aloud. I know they are doing their best. This is one of the only places I felt I could sorta express myself and well maybe I shouldn’t have even done that. 

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2 hours ago, heartlikealion said:


The affluent church is bigger and has been "flooded with requests" from volunteers. Yet, the sign up sheet was mostly blank. That is why I was jumping to the conclusion the hours of operation or the hours of shifts might not be doable for many people.

 

I think this is fairly common. At the beginning of a crisis, people want to help. But, when the details of the nature of the help needed become available, many people have already moved on in their interests for a variety of reasons. Typically, 20% of the people do 80% of the work, so I wouldn't be surprised at all if a core of volunteers carries the resource center with sporadic help from others. People do have to work volunteering around their schedules and not every volunteer opportunity is a match to availability and/or skill. None of this means that the Resource Center is doing anything wrong, though. As a regular volunteer, I can say that a two hour shift is incredibly short, especially for occasional, sporadic help. By the time the volunteer has gotten the hang of what they are supposed to be doing, it's time for them to move on and another volunteer steps in, who may then need instructions/training. It's exhausting for everyone concerned, though, no matter how the shifts are done. As they get further into the process, they may develop some flexibility with shift timing, realize what areas need more volunteers than others, what peak days & hours are and recruit volunteers accordingly. Getting to the point where they have that type of information to adjust scheduling just takes time.

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You guys speak as if there’s a huge training curve. I walked in, they said keep an eye on kids. Boom. Done. Lady in kitchen said I need you to make sandwiches using this stuff. Boom. Done. 

We’re not talking rocket science. 

Yes. They may not want to repeat themselves 20x a day or have shifts change too often. Well I don’t know many people working full time going straight to a 3 hr shift after work. So we’ll just see how it plays out and I’ll shut up. 

Edited by heartlikealion
Mainly I can’t type

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1 hour ago, heartlikealion said:

You guys speak as if there’s a huge training curve. I walked in, they said keep an eye on kids. Boom. Done. Lady in kitchen said I need you to make sandwiches using this stuff. Boom. Done. 

We’re not talking rocket science. 

Yes. They may not want to repeat themselves 20x a day or have shifts change too often. Well I don’t know many people working full time going straight to a 3 hr shift after work. So we’ll just see how it plays out and I’ll shut up. 

 

However, you had already received required child care training.

I would also say your level of training could probably have been better.

For example, here are the supplies. If you run out of gloves, paper towel, whatever, here is where you go to find more. Due to sanitation regulations, we require you wash your hands, wear gloves, cover your hair, etc.. This is where we dispose of trash - dumpsters are here if your trash can gets full.  Here is where you find extra diapers, wipes and hand gel if you need them. This is our check in system, here's how to find a parent if you need one, clean toys are stored here, dirty toys are placed there, etc..

As time goes on, if the same needs continue, the Resource Center will find it is to their advantage to give volunteers all of this information up front as opposed to them learning on the fly. That takes time.

Some organizations  routinely operate in crisis mode  (Red Cross,  Disaster Recovery Teams, Search & Rescue) because that is their function. Others have detailed crisis plans  because their role in the community  requires them to continue to function as normally as possible in a crisis situation (hospitals & utilities, for example). Most organizations don't routinely operate in crisis mode and when crisis occurs, it takes time for them to ramp up. 

I've been volunteering for years. Chaos followed by mandating a minimum order is a normal process to increase effectiveness and efficiency. They will figure all of this (training, scheduling, shifts, hours, etc.) out. If the disorganization bothers you, consider just waiting a month and try again.

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8 minutes ago, TechWife said:

 

However, you had already received required child care training.

I would also say your level of training could probably have been better.

For example, here are the supplies. If you run out of gloves, paper towel, whatever, here is where you go to find more. Due to sanitation regulations, we require you wash your hands, wear gloves, cover your hair, etc.. This is where we dispose of trash - dumpsters are here if your trash can gets full.  Here is where you find extra diapers, wipes and hand gel if you need them. This is our check in system, here's how to find a parent if you need one, clean toys are stored here, dirty toys are placed there, etc..

As time goes on, if the same needs continue, the Resource Center will find it is to their advantage to give volunteers all of this information up front as opposed to them learning on the fly. That takes time.

Some organizations  routinely operate in crisis mode  (Red Cross,  Disaster Recovery Teams, Search & Rescue) because that is their function. Others have detailed crisis plans  because their role in the community  requires them to continue to function as normally as possible in a crisis situation (hospitals & utilities, for example). Most organizations don't routinely operate in crisis mode and when crisis occurs, it takes time for them to ramp up. 

I've been volunteering for years. Chaos followed by mandating a minimum order is a normal process to increase effectiveness and efficiency. They will figure all of this (training, scheduling, shifts, hours, etc.) out. If the disorganization bothers you, consider just waiting a month and try again.

Yes, I see what you mean. Just to clarify no, I didn’t receive that kind of training. Protection of Children is to make sure children are not at risk for abuse. Ie don’t let adults hold children in their lap. 

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I'm a little blind! I overlooked the email address by the meal list. I spoke to the right person and she explained who eats when and what was the greatest need. She said this week all meals are covered except Saturday and the meals in the morning are mainly for the volunteers like the legal team that are there. She said the families that come and go vary day to day based on when they have to meet with their attorney, etc. What she's suggested is that if we want to help with meals to pick a Saturday meal. I'll see if my tiny parish can help with that (seeing as it's a Saturday the religious sisters may be available). I'll pass the info along and see what they say. The lunch and dinner meals are in the highest demand and those feed more people. If this idea doesn't suit my parish, that's okay. I can still ask. 

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Honestly, I think the bigger mistake they made was leaving you alone instead of having the nursery staffed with 2 or 3 people at all times.

Some people just love other people's kids, so maybe they just assumed everyone has an unlimited store of energy for that.  But it isn't so.

Volunteering is a very individual thing.  I dislike the tone of others telling you how you should feel about the task you spent 3 hours doing.  Your organization needs to work with you to find the area you can assist without coming away drained and annoyed.

And you are right to question what can be done to make the future service work more enjoyable and meaningful to you.  In the long run, that will enable you to help more.

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2 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

I'm a little blind! I overlooked the email address by the meal list. I spoke to the right person and she explained who eats when and what was the greatest need. She said this week all meals are covered except Saturday and the meals in the morning are mainly for the volunteers like the legal team that are there. She said the families that come and go vary day to day based on when they have to meet with their attorney, etc. What she's suggested is that if we want to help with meals to pick a Saturday meal. I'll see if my tiny parish can help with that (seeing as it's a Saturday the religious sisters may be available). I'll pass the info along and see what they say. The lunch and dinner meals are in the highest demand and those feed more people. If this idea doesn't suit my parish, that's okay. I can still ask. 

Oh good!

Honestly, I bet the people running it felt as overworked and out of sorts as you did, the other night. A bit like the blind leading the blind. I'm guessing they were overwhelmed with way more people showing up than they expected, and will learn as they go. 

And again, I'm in awe you are doing what you are doing, even as you are conflicted over how it is run and what to think about the entire situation. You are not letting perfect be the enemy of the good, and I applaud you for that. 

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1 hour ago, SKL said:

Honestly, I think the bigger mistake they made was leaving you alone instead of having the nursery staffed with 2 or 3 people at all times.

Some people just love other people's kids, so maybe they just assumed everyone has an unlimited store of energy for that.  But it isn't so.

Volunteering is a very individual thing.  I dislike the tone of others telling you how you should feel about the task you spent 3 hours doing.  Your organization needs to work with you to find the area you can assist without coming away drained and annoyed.

And you are right to question what can be done to make the future service work more enjoyable and meaningful to you.  In the long run, that will enable you to help more.

I wasn't alone the whole time, but definitely part of the time. One of girls from out of state came in the room for part of the time, etc. But there were times I was all alone and when the lady that showed up later in the evening checked in on the room she spoke to me like I was oblivious to easy solutions. "Why didn't you just turn on a DVD?" she said. I had asked the kids at one point which tvs, if any, were operational in the room. The kids told me which one but I didn't know the church had DVDs/where, who would sit still to watch one, and if I wanted that extra sensory overload (assuming some kids would be running around while the TV was on at the same time). After like 10 min. she got the DVD player set up. The first movie wouldn't play or something. I have no idea what she put on as she sent me to wait in the kitchen, but by then there were less kids and mostly older ones, all of whom were now munching on the candy she had me pass out, so it wasn't so surprising to me they were sitting still. 

It was definitely a learning experience and I have been humbled by the experience. Mostly the feedback in this thread LOL. Going forward I would know what to expect (or a better idea). They do have up to three people that can sign up at once for those hours, but my guess is you're lucky to get one person to commit to the shift, let alone three (on the link, anyway. In real life, you may have someone they can move to the room). I've never done any volunteering outside of very short-term things (ie. one day event, week event) so I'm sure that changes a lot of the dynamic. I am learning. 
 

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I made photocopies today for the handout from the more affluent parish. I'm going to pass these around at my church. It focuses on the humanitarian aspect of the situation noting that this is not about politics. I think reading that was helpful to me and may be for others. 

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7 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

I made photocopies today for the handout from the more affluent parish. I'm going to pass these around at my church. It focuses on the humanitarian aspect of the situation noting that this is not about politics. I think reading that was helpful to me and may be for others. 

Wonderful!

It always shocks me how many who are all ready to judge other Catholics for not following every single bit of teaching exactly have no issue ignoring the teaching on immigration/refugees, etc. (not you, obviously...just people I've come across, some related to me even. All ready to quote a Pope until it's something like this)

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1 hour ago, Ktgrok said:

Wonderful!

It always shocks me how many who are all ready to judge other Catholics for not following every single bit of teaching exactly have no issue ignoring the teaching on immigration/refugees, etc. (not you, obviously...just people I've come across, some related to me even. All ready to quote a Pope until it's something like this)

Yeah, we all have our blind spots I guess. I mean I was really upset about this whole ordeal this week and trying to tell my son I wasn't being a good Christian and I need to work on it. I don't know if he was evening listening lol. But he's tagging along with me during some of this and I think modeling is good. I showed him the Fideo ramen noodles and said, "hey! I bet you'd like these" and he said, "it's okay, they need them more." 

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4 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

Yeah, we all have our blind spots I guess. I mean I was really upset about this whole ordeal this week and trying to tell my son I wasn't being a good Christian and I need to work on it. I don't know if he was evening listening lol. But he's tagging along with me during some of this and I think modeling is good. I showed him the Fideo ramen noodles and said, "hey! I bet you'd like these" and he said, "it's okay, they need them more." 

That is one special kid you got there. Modeling to US, he is.

I'm glad you're hanging in, and helping to work out the kinks. 

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44 minutes ago, Pam in CT said:

That is one special kid you got there. Modeling to US, he is.

I'm glad you're hanging in, and helping to work out the kinks. 

Right?! I can learn a lot from him. 

The religious sisters are out of town but maybe we can hash something out when they return. I did find out from my foodie page where to get certain Mexican items but then realized Mexican isn’t the dominant culture lol my friend did get back to me with ideas that may still be relevant, though. 

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About the 3hr shifts for babysitting. It may be hard on the volunteers, but I think it would be very detrimental for the children to have a more frequent rotation of caregivers daily. Especially if this is a program they are coming to frequently, it would be bad for their mental health to have new caregivers every hour or 2. Hopefully the group you are working with will find people who love working with kids and you can move on to something that you enjoy more. It's not a crime to think working with a bunch of other people's kids you don't know isn't fun. 

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