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Huge ICE raid in my state


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17 minutes ago, Ktgrok said:

If so they will figure it out over time. This is a very different situation than a lot they have dealt with so may take a while for everything to shake loose. Try to focus on the good you did, the help you and others provided, rather than the hiccups in how this is being run. Since you can't control that stuff, focus on the good you did. 

I only said something once aloud about the potential hour obstacle. Most of what I’ve said is strictly here. I have been focusing on other ways I could assist or pass info along. They have posted needs for meals but it’s unclear if the meals should be dropped off or prepared in the kitchen (I can’t picture too many people in the kitchen). I asked about food ideas... American food or perhaps something more traditional? Not everyone is Mexican. I know I could be overthinking it but sometimes it’s good to ask questions so you don’t waste everyone’s time in another way. My mom had no ideas beyond sweet Mexican bread. And she’s hypoglycemic so naturally we think about a need for protein which things like sweets don’t provide. Mexican bread is a specialty item to me. Probably not cheap and only found in Spanish grocery stores. /shrug. I’ve had it before but I was in California. 

I texted a few people for ideas. One was raised in Mexico. Have not heard back. In fact I get the vibe she wants nothing to do with this (I did not ask her to volunteer). She’s a homeschooler and actually teaches Spanish. She has not said a word about the raids online or off. 

You guys don’t have to worry. I’ll be careful what I say aloud. I know they are doing their best. This is one of the only places I felt I could sorta express myself and well maybe I shouldn’t have even done that. 

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2 hours ago, heartlikealion said:


The affluent church is bigger and has been "flooded with requests" from volunteers. Yet, the sign up sheet was mostly blank. That is why I was jumping to the conclusion the hours of operation or the hours of shifts might not be doable for many people.

 

I think this is fairly common. At the beginning of a crisis, people want to help. But, when the details of the nature of the help needed become available, many people have already moved on in their interests for a variety of reasons. Typically, 20% of the people do 80% of the work, so I wouldn't be surprised at all if a core of volunteers carries the resource center with sporadic help from others. People do have to work volunteering around their schedules and not every volunteer opportunity is a match to availability and/or skill. None of this means that the Resource Center is doing anything wrong, though. As a regular volunteer, I can say that a two hour shift is incredibly short, especially for occasional, sporadic help. By the time the volunteer has gotten the hang of what they are supposed to be doing, it's time for them to move on and another volunteer steps in, who may then need instructions/training. It's exhausting for everyone concerned, though, no matter how the shifts are done. As they get further into the process, they may develop some flexibility with shift timing, realize what areas need more volunteers than others, what peak days & hours are and recruit volunteers accordingly. Getting to the point where they have that type of information to adjust scheduling just takes time.

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You guys speak as if there’s a huge training curve. I walked in, they said keep an eye on kids. Boom. Done. Lady in kitchen said I need you to make sandwiches using this stuff. Boom. Done. 

We’re not talking rocket science. 

Yes. They may not want to repeat themselves 20x a day or have shifts change too often. Well I don’t know many people working full time going straight to a 3 hr shift after work. So we’ll just see how it plays out and I’ll shut up. 

Edited by heartlikealion
Mainly I can’t type
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1 hour ago, heartlikealion said:

You guys speak as if there’s a huge training curve. I walked in, they said keep an eye on kids. Boom. Done. Lady in kitchen said I need you to make sandwiches using this stuff. Boom. Done. 

We’re not talking rocket science. 

Yes. They may not want to repeat themselves 20x a day or have shifts change too often. Well I don’t know many people working full time going straight to a 3 hr shift after work. So we’ll just see how it plays out and I’ll shut up. 

 

However, you had already received required child care training.

I would also say your level of training could probably have been better.

For example, here are the supplies. If you run out of gloves, paper towel, whatever, here is where you go to find more. Due to sanitation regulations, we require you wash your hands, wear gloves, cover your hair, etc.. This is where we dispose of trash - dumpsters are here if your trash can gets full.  Here is where you find extra diapers, wipes and hand gel if you need them. This is our check in system, here's how to find a parent if you need one, clean toys are stored here, dirty toys are placed there, etc..

As time goes on, if the same needs continue, the Resource Center will find it is to their advantage to give volunteers all of this information up front as opposed to them learning on the fly. That takes time.

Some organizations  routinely operate in crisis mode  (Red Cross,  Disaster Recovery Teams, Search & Rescue) because that is their function. Others have detailed crisis plans  because their role in the community  requires them to continue to function as normally as possible in a crisis situation (hospitals & utilities, for example). Most organizations don't routinely operate in crisis mode and when crisis occurs, it takes time for them to ramp up. 

I've been volunteering for years. Chaos followed by mandating a minimum order is a normal process to increase effectiveness and efficiency. They will figure all of this (training, scheduling, shifts, hours, etc.) out. If the disorganization bothers you, consider just waiting a month and try again.

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8 minutes ago, TechWife said:

 

However, you had already received required child care training.

I would also say your level of training could probably have been better.

For example, here are the supplies. If you run out of gloves, paper towel, whatever, here is where you go to find more. Due to sanitation regulations, we require you wash your hands, wear gloves, cover your hair, etc.. This is where we dispose of trash - dumpsters are here if your trash can gets full.  Here is where you find extra diapers, wipes and hand gel if you need them. This is our check in system, here's how to find a parent if you need one, clean toys are stored here, dirty toys are placed there, etc..

As time goes on, if the same needs continue, the Resource Center will find it is to their advantage to give volunteers all of this information up front as opposed to them learning on the fly. That takes time.

Some organizations  routinely operate in crisis mode  (Red Cross,  Disaster Recovery Teams, Search & Rescue) because that is their function. Others have detailed crisis plans  because their role in the community  requires them to continue to function as normally as possible in a crisis situation (hospitals & utilities, for example). Most organizations don't routinely operate in crisis mode and when crisis occurs, it takes time for them to ramp up. 

I've been volunteering for years. Chaos followed by mandating a minimum order is a normal process to increase effectiveness and efficiency. They will figure all of this (training, scheduling, shifts, hours, etc.) out. If the disorganization bothers you, consider just waiting a month and try again.

Yes, I see what you mean. Just to clarify no, I didn’t receive that kind of training. Protection of Children is to make sure children are not at risk for abuse. Ie don’t let adults hold children in their lap. 

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I'm a little blind! I overlooked the email address by the meal list. I spoke to the right person and she explained who eats when and what was the greatest need. She said this week all meals are covered except Saturday and the meals in the morning are mainly for the volunteers like the legal team that are there. She said the families that come and go vary day to day based on when they have to meet with their attorney, etc. What she's suggested is that if we want to help with meals to pick a Saturday meal. I'll see if my tiny parish can help with that (seeing as it's a Saturday the religious sisters may be available). I'll pass the info along and see what they say. The lunch and dinner meals are in the highest demand and those feed more people. If this idea doesn't suit my parish, that's okay. I can still ask. 

Edited by heartlikealion
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Honestly, I think the bigger mistake they made was leaving you alone instead of having the nursery staffed with 2 or 3 people at all times.

Some people just love other people's kids, so maybe they just assumed everyone has an unlimited store of energy for that.  But it isn't so.

Volunteering is a very individual thing.  I dislike the tone of others telling you how you should feel about the task you spent 3 hours doing.  Your organization needs to work with you to find the area you can assist without coming away drained and annoyed.

And you are right to question what can be done to make the future service work more enjoyable and meaningful to you.  In the long run, that will enable you to help more.

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2 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

I'm a little blind! I overlooked the email address by the meal list. I spoke to the right person and she explained who eats when and what was the greatest need. She said this week all meals are covered except Saturday and the meals in the morning are mainly for the volunteers like the legal team that are there. She said the families that come and go vary day to day based on when they have to meet with their attorney, etc. What she's suggested is that if we want to help with meals to pick a Saturday meal. I'll see if my tiny parish can help with that (seeing as it's a Saturday the religious sisters may be available). I'll pass the info along and see what they say. The lunch and dinner meals are in the highest demand and those feed more people. If this idea doesn't suit my parish, that's okay. I can still ask. 

Oh good!

Honestly, I bet the people running it felt as overworked and out of sorts as you did, the other night. A bit like the blind leading the blind. I'm guessing they were overwhelmed with way more people showing up than they expected, and will learn as they go. 

And again, I'm in awe you are doing what you are doing, even as you are conflicted over how it is run and what to think about the entire situation. You are not letting perfect be the enemy of the good, and I applaud you for that. 

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1 hour ago, SKL said:

Honestly, I think the bigger mistake they made was leaving you alone instead of having the nursery staffed with 2 or 3 people at all times.

Some people just love other people's kids, so maybe they just assumed everyone has an unlimited store of energy for that.  But it isn't so.

Volunteering is a very individual thing.  I dislike the tone of others telling you how you should feel about the task you spent 3 hours doing.  Your organization needs to work with you to find the area you can assist without coming away drained and annoyed.

And you are right to question what can be done to make the future service work more enjoyable and meaningful to you.  In the long run, that will enable you to help more.

I wasn't alone the whole time, but definitely part of the time. One of girls from out of state came in the room for part of the time, etc. But there were times I was all alone and when the lady that showed up later in the evening checked in on the room she spoke to me like I was oblivious to easy solutions. "Why didn't you just turn on a DVD?" she said. I had asked the kids at one point which tvs, if any, were operational in the room. The kids told me which one but I didn't know the church had DVDs/where, who would sit still to watch one, and if I wanted that extra sensory overload (assuming some kids would be running around while the TV was on at the same time). After like 10 min. she got the DVD player set up. The first movie wouldn't play or something. I have no idea what she put on as she sent me to wait in the kitchen, but by then there were less kids and mostly older ones, all of whom were now munching on the candy she had me pass out, so it wasn't so surprising to me they were sitting still. 

It was definitely a learning experience and I have been humbled by the experience. Mostly the feedback in this thread LOL. Going forward I would know what to expect (or a better idea). They do have up to three people that can sign up at once for those hours, but my guess is you're lucky to get one person to commit to the shift, let alone three (on the link, anyway. In real life, you may have someone they can move to the room). I've never done any volunteering outside of very short-term things (ie. one day event, week event) so I'm sure that changes a lot of the dynamic. I am learning. 
 

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I made photocopies today for the handout from the more affluent parish. I'm going to pass these around at my church. It focuses on the humanitarian aspect of the situation noting that this is not about politics. I think reading that was helpful to me and may be for others. 

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7 minutes ago, heartlikealion said:

I made photocopies today for the handout from the more affluent parish. I'm going to pass these around at my church. It focuses on the humanitarian aspect of the situation noting that this is not about politics. I think reading that was helpful to me and may be for others. 

Wonderful!

It always shocks me how many who are all ready to judge other Catholics for not following every single bit of teaching exactly have no issue ignoring the teaching on immigration/refugees, etc. (not you, obviously...just people I've come across, some related to me even. All ready to quote a Pope until it's something like this)

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1 hour ago, Ktgrok said:

Wonderful!

It always shocks me how many who are all ready to judge other Catholics for not following every single bit of teaching exactly have no issue ignoring the teaching on immigration/refugees, etc. (not you, obviously...just people I've come across, some related to me even. All ready to quote a Pope until it's something like this)

Yeah, we all have our blind spots I guess. I mean I was really upset about this whole ordeal this week and trying to tell my son I wasn't being a good Christian and I need to work on it. I don't know if he was evening listening lol. But he's tagging along with me during some of this and I think modeling is good. I showed him the Fideo ramen noodles and said, "hey! I bet you'd like these" and he said, "it's okay, they need them more." 

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4 hours ago, heartlikealion said:

Yeah, we all have our blind spots I guess. I mean I was really upset about this whole ordeal this week and trying to tell my son I wasn't being a good Christian and I need to work on it. I don't know if he was evening listening lol. But he's tagging along with me during some of this and I think modeling is good. I showed him the Fideo ramen noodles and said, "hey! I bet you'd like these" and he said, "it's okay, they need them more." 

That is one special kid you got there. Modeling to US, he is.

I'm glad you're hanging in, and helping to work out the kinks. 

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44 minutes ago, Pam in CT said:

That is one special kid you got there. Modeling to US, he is.

I'm glad you're hanging in, and helping to work out the kinks. 

Right?! I can learn a lot from him. 

The religious sisters are out of town but maybe we can hash something out when they return. I did find out from my foodie page where to get certain Mexican items but then realized Mexican isn’t the dominant culture lol my friend did get back to me with ideas that may still be relevant, though. 

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About the 3hr shifts for babysitting. It may be hard on the volunteers, but I think it would be very detrimental for the children to have a more frequent rotation of caregivers daily. Especially if this is a program they are coming to frequently, it would be bad for their mental health to have new caregivers every hour or 2. Hopefully the group you are working with will find people who love working with kids and you can move on to something that you enjoy more. It's not a crime to think working with a bunch of other people's kids you don't know isn't fun. 

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