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I am curious how you handle foreign languages, especially if you have a child with a big interest in languages. We live in a town with a lot of interactions with French speakers, so they really should learn it for practical reasons. I want them to learn Latin and ASL. They want to learn Latin, Greek, Arabic, and Italian.  

How many languages can practically be taught at the same time? I can easily outsource Arabic, French, and Latin. 

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We are native English speakers who speak Spanish in the home and do a smidgen of bilingual homeschooling. We are also learning ASL, Ancient Greek and Japanese. Japanese has been a struggle.

I taught reading in Spanish, spelling in English and grammar and writing in both. They do several subjects in Spanish or with some Spanish materials.

We just did Signing Time and I don't know where to go with ASL but they all sign regularly which is nice because they are LOUD.

I began Greek in 1st with Hey Andrew I followed by Greek Alphabet Code Cracker, continued in 2nd with Elementary Greek I and Hey Andrew Copybook, in 3rd grade we will continue with EG II, HA Copybook and will add in Dobson to get him reading. We will then do EG III while reading the NT, then Greek 101 (TGC), then Athenaze and hopefully be reading Greek texts in high school.

I haven't figured out how to teach Japanese well. This was something he asked for and I wish he hadn't. I think we were at our language max, but I listened to my bleeding heart instead of my mommy gut and here we are.

We will begin Latin in 4th with Getting Started With Latin followed by Keep Going With Latin (GSWL II) and Oxford, again hoping to read Latin texts in high school.

They will take something to meet the high school foreign language requirement in high school.

So by graduation I'm hoping for En/Sp bilingualism, reading in Latin, Greek and basic Hebrew (Dobson, for Bible study), proficiency in signing, Japanese and one additional language.

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