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Kudo

Everyone shortens my son's name.....

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7 hours ago, sassenach said:

Lol, my MIL completely renames my kids. Turns one name into the Spanish version, changes another kids’ name. English isn’t her first language so I let it go. 

 

My husband's grandfather gave my son a completely different name.  Like, he heard my son's name and said "No, I'm going to call you Little John, instead", because grandpa's name is John, I guess? I was like...um...I don't know what to do here...

Grandpa is 86 so I'm just letting it go.

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My kids have two first names (two words for first name). People shortened their names to only the first word of their first names. They don’t answer as that “first word” is the same for both my kids as well as a lot of people. They have no idea who the person is calling so they ignore. My DS13’s second word of his first name is also very common and when people call him by that, he doesn’t answer either because he don’t know if he is being called. Luckily teachers and instructors have realized that and use their full first names after not getting any response and a bewildered look (or two bewildered looks) from my kids. 

I have my name shortened/misspelled most often at Starbucks. Now that I use the app for ordering, the issue no longer exists. My friends and ex-colleagues all spell my name correctly. Now that most things are electronic communications, I rarely encounter misspelt names in emails and printed letters.

My husband’s name rhymes with Coke (coca cola). Someone at a fast food place puts my husband’s name down as Coook on the order. It was the first time his name was wrongly spelt as cook. My husband doesn’t mind when fast food places misspell his name as Coke. His colleagues and friends all got his name correct.

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Sean is hard for dyslexic kids who have managed to get as far as long E for ea.  Then if they get the Shawn sound for Sean, a Seamus If they meet one tends to cause more troubles. 

 

And last names are increasingly little help.  We might have a Juan Williams and a Vaughn Rivera and a Phan O’Mara and a Merri Nguyen in a class.  

 

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1 hour ago, MissLemon said:

My husband's grandfather gave my son a completely different name.  Like, he heard my son's name and said "No, I'm going to call you Little John, instead", because grandpa's name is John, I guess? I was like...um...I don't know what to do here...

Grandpa is 86 so I'm just letting it go.

We specifically named our DD a traditional, feminine name without common nicknames. Upon meeting her the first time, my (rather obnoxious) granddad said he was going to call her "his name," which is the male version of her name (but obviously a different name).  I was not pleased. 

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2 hours ago, MissLemon said:

 

My husband's grandfather gave my son a completely different name.  Like, he heard my son's name and said "No, I'm going to call you Little John, instead", because grandpa's name is John, I guess? I was like...um...I don't know what to do here...

Grandpa is 86 so I'm just letting it go.

This is similar to how my dad became Charlie.

One of his first jobs was in a body shop, and shortly after he was hired, the owner looked at him and told him, "I can't remember a name like Clarence! You wanna work here; you're Charlie from now on." The owner was my mother's uncle so putting up with a totally new name that stuck for the next 40 years worked out well since he met the love of his life at that body shop. 

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6 hours ago, klmama said:

I've seen this happen multiple times with the name "Gabriel."  I know a couple of boys with that name, and usually they go by "Gabe," but when their names are called from forms that have the full name, people say "Gabrielle," even though they know they are talking about/to a boy.  I'd understand if maybe they learned the name in Spanish first, but I very much doubt that's the case.  

 

 

 

 

Ding, ding!  You're the winner!

Yup, that's it.

It is EVERYONE.

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1 hour ago, Pen said:

That’s so odd. I’ve never seen that spelling as a girls name.  OP some of us would pronounce it properly.  Sorry that’s not your experience.

My oldest has a Old Testament name that’s gone from 170 on lists to 50 over his life—so rising popularity. Nurses, librarians all call him another OT names that starts with the same letter that’s very popular.  Since that was the other name in contention when he was born, I don’t mind—but I’m glad we didn’t use that name for our next child. Ds thinks it’s funny.

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58 minutes ago, freesia said:

That’s so odd. I’ve never seen that spelling as a girls name.  OP some of us would pronounce it properly.  Sorry that’s not your experience.

My oldest has a Old Testament name that’s gone from 170 on lists to 50 over his life—so rising popularity. Nurses, librarians all call him another OT names that starts with the same letter that’s very popular.  Since that was the other name in contention when he was born, I don’t mind—but I’m glad we didn’t use that name for our next child. Ds thinks it’s funny.

 

I think some of this may be from “similar”  usually girl names like Muriel, Ariel, and Mariel or maybe from parents wanting to be more gender neutral? 

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6 hours ago, MissLemon said:

 

My husband's grandfather gave my son a completely different name.  Like, he heard my son's name and said "No, I'm going to call you Little John, instead", because grandpa's name is John, I guess? I was like...um...I don't know what to do here...

Grandpa is 86 so I'm just letting it go.

I had a client once whose given name was Harold but he went by Hank. When he was in the 2nd or 3rd grade (this would've been in the early 1920s), his teacher that year refused to call him Hank because she'd been jilted by a Hank. So she said she was going to call him Hal. And that's the name he went used for the rest of his life 😁

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49 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

Arial, of course, was also a traditionally male name... until The Little Mermaid came out.

 

There’ve been some fairly prominent female Ariels before that: Ariel Durant, Ariel Levy come to my mind

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7 hours ago, Farrar said:

According to the Name Wizard, there are no female Dominics, Dominique is  dramatically more popular for girls, but there are male Dominiques - more than I expected.

 

I have taught male Dominiques. It’s one of those names like Angel where my guess at gender would depend on ethnicity.  All female in some cultures, unisex in others.

I was thinking this thread might be about Joel, which is another name like Gabriel where the pronunciation in other languages is like an English girl’s name (Joelle).  

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3 hours ago, Pen said:

People can name their girl that, but it's not an original girl name.  Gabrielle is the girl version.

One problem is that people read "Gabriel" then pronounce it as "Gabrielle."

Biggest problem is that it's shortened to "Gabe" 98% of the time.  Then they call him Gabe....reel because they're correct themselves...repeatedly.  

 


 

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10 minutes ago, Kudo said:

People can name their girl that, but it's not an original girl name.  Gabrielle is the girl version.

One problem is that people read "Gabriel" then pronounce it as "Gabrielle."

Biggest problem is that it's shortened to "Gabe" 98% of the time.  Then they call him Gabe....reel because they're correct themselves...repeatedly.  

 


 

 

How about saying “it’s “Gabriel” with 3 syllables, accent on the first syllable, just like the angel” 

 

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I hate to say it but it's probably a losing battle. My mother didn't want my brother's name shortened. Everyone shortened it.

This is my son, Steven, she said. Hi Steve, they said.

The thing is, once he hit his teen years he started going by Steve and that's what all of his friends call him now. Only a few older family members still call him Steven. 

Keep trying, and let people know that you don't shorten it, but accept that it's probably going to happen anyway. 

Edited by Lady Florida.
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My mom's brothers and sisters all had long, formal names and all were called by nicknames.
So, when my mama had her three she picked names that couldn't be shorted.

And, thus, I ended up with K.J. (initials), my brother nicknamed another name entirely, and my sister (Jill) got Jillie.

What is the deal with people wanting to call people nicknames?!  (Are you, by chance, in the Midwest?)
Though I must digress, all of my kids have long, formal names which we've shortened.  

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On 8/2/2019 at 9:54 AM, vonfirmath said:

 

My sister is Rachel and I had a co-worker named Rachelle.

I had a very difficult time switching to calling my co-worker "Rachelle" instead of "Rachel"

Thankfully she was gracious when I slipped up.

I have close friends named Kristin and Kirsten. Their last names rhyme. They're also listed next to each other on my phone.  I had plans with Kirsten, but accidentally texted Kristin. 
Me: I'm running a little late. Pick you up at 6:30.
Kristin (always spontaneous and flexible): Great!  Where are we going?

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DS doesn’t have a name that can be shortened period.  But what we’ve found is that it is pronounced one way in the US and a totally different way in the rest of the world.  DS never minded and it never occurred to me to correct people, so he goes by one pronunciation with some people and a different one with others. 

Some other people call him by his middle name (think, if his first name were Seamus, his middle name would be Giuseppe).  And then there are some people who call him by an ethnic nickname of his middle name (think something different like Ahmed).

So DS just categorizes people and answers to their respective names 🙂

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13 hours ago, BlsdMama said:

My mom's brothers and sisters all had long, formal names and all were called by nicknames.
So, when my mama had her three she picked names that couldn't be shorted.

And, thus, I ended up with K.J. (initials), my brother nicknamed another name entirely, and my sister (Jill) got Jillie.

What is the deal with people wanting to call people nicknames?!  (Are you, by chance, in the Midwest?)
Though I must digress, all of my kids have long, formal names which we've shortened.  

Yes, we're in the Midwest, but I haven't noticed other people having their names shortened.  It is just this one name.  Even after people are corrected, they will repeatedly even catch themselves saying it and then add on the rest of the his name. 

I think it's disrespectful to continually call someone by the wrong name, and people shouldn't change someone's name.  He's actually had other kids argue with him about his own name!

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I have such a short, boring name that I wanted all my kids to have names with nicknames. All 3 can be shortened but one is not really a nickname I like so his is always his given name. Should he want to go by that or any other nickname it is up to him.

I had a roommate in college named Kimberly. I asked if she went by Kim and she replied, "My mom always says 'If I wanted you to be called Kim I would have named you Kim'". 

She did eventually start going by Kim and Kimmy. 

I just can't get that worked up about names. And, since our lastname is always misspelled and mispronounced my kids don't get very worked up either.

Kelly

 

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I think that each person should decide on their own name - or form of name.  By this I mean, that even for my own children, while my husband and named I them initially, once my kids were verbal and were able to articulate their own wishes, I handed over their name preferences to my kids.  Now if my kids had trouble expressing themselves especially to overbearing family members, I would come to their defense, but it is their choice whether they use the long form or a shorter form or their middle name etc. 

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As a kid, I really, really hated being called 'Rose.' Except by the bloke next door. For some reason I didn't mind it from him. Evidently I've grown up in the past few decades. I think there are now three blokes of my acquaintance that can call me Rose without annoying me. 

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On 8/2/2019 at 11:06 PM, Kudo said:

People can name their girl that, but it's not an original girl name.  Gabrielle is the girl version.

One problem is that people read "Gabriel" then pronounce it as "Gabrielle."

Biggest problem is that it's shortened to "Gabe" 98% of the time.  Then they call him Gabe....reel because they're correct themselves...repeatedly.  

 


 

 

I read "Gabriel" and "Gabrielle" as the same word.

How is "Gabriel" supposed to be pronounced?

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13 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

 

I read "Gabriel" and "Gabrielle" as the same word.

How is "Gabriel" supposed to be pronounced?


Gabriel is like the Archangel, so it's "Gay-bree-ul" (emphasis on the first syllable).  Gabrielle is "Gah-bree-el" (emphasis on last syllable). 
And until you replied, I had no idea that there were people who read them the same (versus just reading too quickly and making a mistake).

FWIW, OP, I'd get it right! Gabriel is among my favorite boy names. I never had the chance to use it, as we are close to a little Gabriela. Her problem is that no one get her nickname right. It's Gabi (pronounced Gah-bee), not Gabby (like someone who talks too much).

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17 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

 

I read "Gabriel" and "Gabrielle" as the same word.

How is "Gabriel" supposed to be pronounced?

I say Gabriel— GAY-bree-ul

Gabrielle—Gah-BREE-Elle (although I’ve known one Gay-BREE-Elle ( Elle is pronounced like the letter name)

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1 minute ago, barnwife said:


Gabriel is like the Archangel, so it's "Gay-bree-ul" (emphasis on the first syllable).  Gabrielle is "Gah-bree-el" (emphasis on last syllable). 
And until you replied, I had no idea that there were people who read them the same (versus just reading too quickly and making a mistake).

FWIW, OP, I'd get it right! Gabriel is among my favorite boy names. I never had the chance to use it, as we are close to a little Gabriela. Her problem is that no one get her nickname right. It's Gabi (pronounced Gah-bee), not Gabby (like someone who talks too much).


And, to be clear, that's the English pronunciation.  There are many languages where Gabriel is pronounced the way we pronounce Gabrielle in English.  

It's one of my very favorite names too.  My husband didn't like it enough to use it, but I love it.  However, living in a diverse area, my first though in hearing Gabriel pronounced like Gabrielle wouldn't be that they were pronouncing it "like a girl", it would be that they were pronouncing it as though they were speaking Spanish or French. 

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This is one of the reasons one of my husband’s criteria when we were choosing names was that he didn’t want any name that could be shortened or had a commonly used nickname (think Bob for Robert).

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43 minutes ago, freesia said:

I say Gabriel— GAY-bree-ul

Gabrielle—Gah-BREE-Elle (although I’ve known one Gay-BREE-Elle ( Elle is pronounced like the letter name)

 

Okay I'd say both as GAH-bree-elle.  Close as I can put pronunctiation to what I'm reading. The Bree part being emphasized just sounds off to my ear.

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45 minutes ago, vonfirmath said:

Okay I'd say both as GAH-bree-elle.  Close as I can put pronunctiation to what I'm reading. The Bree part being emphasized just sounds off to my ear.

I've never heard it with the Bree empasized - either first or last, like another poster wrote. GAY-bree-ul for the angel or male name, and Gah-bree-ELLE  for the female.

In English, at least, as a PP said.  English has the same pattern for other similar male/female pairs like Daniel/Danielle, Mich(a)el/Michelle, which are all pronounced the same for both sexes in French (with the emphasis on the last syllable).

Edited by Matryoshka
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On 8/3/2019 at 5:14 PM, BlsdMama said:

My mom's brothers and sisters all had long, formal names and all were called by nicknames.
So, when my mama had her three she picked names that couldn't be shorted.

And, thus, I ended up with K.J. (initials), my brother nicknamed another name entirely, and my sister (Jill) got Jillie.

What is the deal with people wanting to call people nicknames?!  (Are you, by chance, in the Midwest?)
Though I must digress, all of my kids have long, formal names which we've shortened.  

Nm

Edited by Frances

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Gabrielle is a French name originally, and so the stress ought to be on the LAST syllable. Certainly that's the only way I've ever heard that name. (I've also almost always heard it, at least in English, with the initial syllable rhyming with "lab".)

Edited by Tanaqui

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6 hours ago, Tanaqui said:

Gabrielle is a French name originally, and so the stress ought to be on the LAST syllable. Certainly that's the only way I've ever heard that name. (I've also almost always heard it, at least in English, with the initial syllable rhyming with "lab".)

In my French degree, we were taught that French was a much less stressed language than English, so all syllables should be hit more or less equally. In fact, it's a good part of an anglophone accent in French that we use too much stress. So ga bree elle. The first syllable is a short a, as you say.

Edited by Laura Corin
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I was very struck by meeting a man some decades ago. He had called his son Christopher, even though he hated 'Chris'. They used 'Kit' as a nickname. When the child grew up, he chose Chris. The father was upset enough to tell a stranger about it during a first conversation. 

When we were choosing names, we went for recognisable in the anglophone cultures of both parents, and pronounceable in Mandarin too. And we tried to think through all possible nicknames to make sure we were happy with them.

It is, of course, only polite to try to call people the name they prefer.

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On 8/3/2019 at 6:10 PM, Lady Florida. said:

I hate to say it but it's probably a losing battle. My mother didn't want my brother's name shortened. Everyone shortened it.

This is my son, Steven, she said. Hi Steve, they said.

The thing is, once he hit his teen years he started going by Steve and that's what all of his friends call him now. Only a few older family members still call him Steven. 

Keep trying, and let people know that you don't shorten it, but accept that it's probably going to happen anyway. 

I think it’s a losing battle, too. This was a reason some names did not make it to our short list when we were naming kids. My kids all have names with no normal nickname because of this. I didn’t want to go around being the Name Enforcer. One name I loved that also has familial roots was Margaret. But I don’t like all the forms it takes and I didn’t want to be constantly annoyed with people calling my kid something I didn’t intend. Margaret did eventually make it onto the roster as a middle name, but I didn’t have a girl, so oh well. 

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We purposely named our kids so that they wouldn't have nicknames.  Two of them have two-syllable names and people shorten their names to one syllable (this drives my dd crazy - she doesn't like it but won't say anything).  The other two have one-syllable names that can't be shortened.  And people still make up nicknames for them anyway but they don't stick like a real nickname.  

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On 8/2/2019 at 9:13 AM, TechWife said:

When people shortened my son's name, he didn't recognize it as his name and didn't respond, so people learned quickly. Perhaps he could just not respond when people call him by the wrong name?

He eventually chose a nickname, but not the common one for his full name & uses that now. Just by way of example, if his name were Charles (it's not), people would have wanted to call him Charlie, but he eventually chose to go by Chuck.

I have a friend named Charles and his wife says that nobody who's met him would ever call him Charlie and definitely not Chuck! She's absolutely right as he's a formal kind of person and neither of those nicknames would fit him at all.

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In Italian American families even one syllable names get changed. One of the most recognizable (think The Sopranos) is that Paul becomes Paulie. 

I'm a Kathleen, shortened to Kathy. Some family members even shorten that to Kath or Kat. 

My son is named after my father (who never actually went by that name but I couldn't use the name he went by). He's Dennis. Although in years past Dennis sometimes became Denny, that's not so common anymore. No one shortens his name except me and even I don't do it that often. I sometimes call him Den. 

Nothing stops people from making nicknames even out of names that don't really have a nickname.

 

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On 8/2/2019 at 6:59 AM, Quill said:

Something similar happens to my dd. In her case, people constantly confuse her name with a few more popular, similar names. People I have known for twenty years still make this mistake. “So, how is Kayla doing?” NOT HER NAME! 

 

 

Depending on my mood, my retort to that might be, "Who's Kayla?" 

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10 hours ago, Tanaqui said:

Gabrielle is a French name originally, and so the stress ought to be on the LAST syllable. Certainly that's the only way I've ever heard that name. (I've also almost always heard it, at least in English, with the initial syllable rhyming with "lab".)

 

That's the only way I've heard it too. 

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On 8/2/2019 at 11:47 PM, CuriousMomof3 said:

 

I have taught male Dominiques. It’s one of those names like Angel where my guess at gender would depend on ethnicity.  All female in some cultures, unisex in others.

I was thinking this thread might be about Joel, which is another name like Gabriel where the pronunciation in other languages is like an English girl’s name (Joelle).  

 

My husband works with a guy who's name is spelled Joel and pronounced Joelle. He's from one of the smaller countries in western Africa. 

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I had a friend in 6th-12th grades who called me Lis (pronounced lease) instead of Lisa. I think it's a losing battle too, especially in this day in age where many things get shortened in spoken conversation: info instead of information, ASAP (pronounced AY-sap) instead of as soon as possible, etc. 

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4 hours ago, QueenCat said:

 

My husband works with a guy who's name is spelled Joel and pronounced Joelle. He's from one of the smaller countries in western Africa. 

 

Two of the the kids who pronounced Joel like Joelle who I have know have been from Haiti, so it doesn't surprise me that French speaking African countries might pronounce it the same way.  I've also taught a Joel who used that pronunciation and came from Central America.

Joel pronounced the English way was on my list for my younger son.  However, I've never met a kid in our area with that pronunciation.  

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We changed the spelling of dd’s name  at the hospital because her name can be either a boy or girl name.  Same as her middle name -which is a family member’s name, so couldn’t change the spelling of that name.  When we called dh’s aunt to tell her, she said she couldn’t tell if the baby was a boy or a girl because the names could be either.  So, we went through the baby book and chose to spell it the most feminine way possible so anybody looking at her name would know she’s a girl despite the possibility of it also being a boy’s name as well.

So, when I ordered her baptism cake, I chose an all white cake with white glitter (very pretty- was a wedding shower cake).  The lady decorating the cake took it upon herself to decorate the cake in blue instead of white to make the cake since she assumed the cake was for a boy, despite the feminine spelling and decorations right there on the form.  Apparently she didn’t know the name was also a girl's name too.  We know way more girls with her name than boys and if you watch a recently made Lifetime movie, you’ll figure out her name as all their newer movies use her name for a female character.

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On 8/5/2019 at 2:07 PM, mom2scouts said:

I have a friend named Charles and his wife says that nobody who's met him would ever call him Charlie and definitely not Chuck! She's absolutely right as he's a formal kind of person and neither of those nicknames would fit him at all.

I had a friend in college named Chuck.  He was a very formal person and clearly should have been called Charles.  It turned out his parents had always called him Charlie, which he didn't like, and so he picked out Chuck when he went to college.  It did NOT fit.  On the other hand, I know a Chuck that is definitely a Chuck, and a Charlie that couldn't be anything else but Charlie.  It's funny how the different forms of that name fit with such different personalities.

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