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Dr. Hive: What could this mean? TMI


Teaching3bears
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1 minute ago, Tanaqui said:

Most farts are, in fact, both scentless and silent. I bet this person is passing it in very small quantities rather than the larger ones many of us have.

This makes sense! She's just very efficient and ladylike, then. I like it.

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This is actually a sign of ill-health?
Their are 2 parts of the Intestine, upper and lower.
Also importantly, their are 2 types of Fiber.  Insoluble and Soluble.

Insoluble Fiber is important for the upper intestine, and provides the bulk to move things along. As well cleaning the lining of the upper intestine.
Then we have Soluble Fiber, which absorbs water and will then turn into a Gel.
This is important for the lower intestine.  Where a variety of important bacteria,  use to this Gel to grow. Through a fermentation process.
These bacteria produce a range of different ' Short Chain Fatty Acids'.   Which are essential for 'good health'. As well regulating the immune system.

The fermentation of these bacteria in the Gel, produce odorless gases as a result.
(Odors are produced in relation to the amount of Sulfides in the diet.)
But if one isn't producing 'odorless gases' regularly?
Then this is a strong indication that they aren't eating enough 'Soluble Fiber' a day.  Where 20gms to 30 gms a day are recommended.

Here's a link to an article about it:
https://www.gicare.com/gi-health-resources/colon-gas-flatus-prevention/

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What if the person has a diet very high in vegetables and eats a very large quantity of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussel sprouts? Tests have also shown that he does not have enough good bacteria despite this and eating yogurt and probiotics. I am just wondering if the lack of odorous gas is a clue to something.

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5 hours ago, Teaching3bears said:

What if the person has a diet very high in vegetables and eats a very large quantity of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussel sprouts? Tests have also shown that he does not have enough good bacteria despite this and eating yogurt and probiotics. I am just wondering if the lack of odorous gas is a clue to something.



This is a conversation we've had a dozen times here.  One of us (HIS name shall not be mentioned) swears it is a sign of an unhealthy gut.  I feel he's on the defense by attacking, however, we did the research like you did and it really does "sound" as though the lack of sound/gas/fermentation could be an issue.  In other news, this past month new research was published that makes ALS look like a gut disease:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mood-microbe/201907/does-als-start-in-the-gut

This is not lost on my husband and he insists a bubbly colon is a happy and healthy colon.

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7 hours ago, BlsdMama said:



This is a conversation we've had a dozen times here.  One of us (HIS name shall not be mentioned) swears it is a sign of an unhealthy gut.  I feel he's on the defense by attacking, however, we did the research like you did and it really does "sound" as though the lack of sound/gas/fermentation could be an issue.  In other news, this past month new research was published that makes ALS look like a gut disease:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mood-microbe/201907/does-als-start-in-the-gut

This is not lost on my husband and he insists a bubbly colon is a happy and healthy colon.

 

Thanks!  What did you discover with your research?  What kind of issues could it be a sign of?

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9 hours ago, Teaching3bears said:

 

Thanks!  What did you discover with your research?  What kind of issues could it be a sign of?



Lack of healthy gut bacteria. 😞  Don't ask me how in the world this could be an issue because *I* am (and always have been) the healthy eater.  Do I feel a little resentment about it?  Pretty much.

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13 hours ago, BlsdMama said:



Lack of healthy gut bacteria. 😞  Don't ask me how in the world this could be an issue because *I* am (and always have been) the healthy eater.  Do I feel a little resentment about it?  Pretty much.

 

Have you had to take a lot of antibiotics?  

Lack of good bacteria is definitely a factor in our case so this all makes sense.  Here we have lack of good bacteria despite eating extremely healthy his whole life, lots of plain yogurt, probiotics.  

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12 hours ago, Teaching3bears said:

 

Have you had to take a lot of antibiotics?  

Lack of good bacteria is definitely a factor in our case so this all makes sense.  Here we have lack of good bacteria despite eating extremely healthy his whole life, lots of plain yogurt, probiotics.  



I started reading Nourishing Traditions close to the beginning of our homeschooling journey so early 2000s.  By 2006/2007 I was culturing my own yogurt.  In 2008 we bought and milked our own goats to eat raw dairy and culture yogurt/kefir, etc.  I was using herbs as supplements before that and was conscious of the healthy gut even back then.  I was eating wheat but it was GMO free and I was grinding and soaking my own.  We've had an organic garden to supplement food since about 2004, but obviously not to a huge extent that we were supplementing more than the summer months and some canning.   We do live in Iowa, land of glyphosate.

The theory is that it isn't necessarily about eating healthy by itself - it's more that some people are more likely to develop (genetic weakness, predisposition, genes flipping on, etc) some issue and then a cascade of issues.

I was not on a lot of antibiotics until after I developed symptoms of neurological issues.  At that point, I took intravenous antibiotics in heavy quantities.  It did not accelerate or decelerate my issues.  That said, they know the microbiome of the gut is off in both MS and ALS.  They also know doxycycline can accelerate ALS progression, it's why I refused doxy, but of course, ceftriaxone is nastier.  

So, the article in the link above - NAM is B3.  There is a study coming out of Australia that shows massive injections of B12 is slowing down progression.  So what?  Well, it shows that ALS (a neurological disease) is impacted by absorption of B3 and B12, at least in mouse models, lol.  But so what?  Is it because of not getting enough?  OR, more likely, an inability to absorb nutrients.  We already know that ALS is a wasting disease.  But we also know 10% of ALS is genetic.  So what then?  And they know the gut health of MS patients is significantly impacted - look at Dr. Wahl and her protocol and the strides they are making in MS - another neurological/gut disease.

Obviously what I'm NOT saying here is that people who don't pass gas are destined to get MS or ALS.  LOL.  No.  But, I'm saying our gut health carries far more impact than medical science yet realizes.  Akkermansia muciniphila and NAM affects insulin resistance and diabetes as well.  

What do they have in common?  These happy, healthy, gut critters like to live in mucus.  They don't thrive in all mediums.  Many of them don't like what we tend to add - I know there was a study with the Akkermansia muciniphila and aspartate/aspartame as a medium and they weren't happy there.

A happy gut is one that bubbles and ferments and absorbs nutrients.  

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Okay. I still think you're probably over-worrying, but I also think it's a crime to let a thread about the microbiome go on for this many comments without saying the words "fecal transplant". There, now I've said them. (I am definitely not recommending you get one - the science is very new here and there's a whole lot of bad and dangerous practices on the DIY front. Unless something is very seriously wrong, don't.)

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26 minutes ago, Teaching3bears said:

I wonder why it's being lost because he is eating a ton of soluble fibre.


There are a lot of theories out there why the gut becomes inhospitable to life. Some would say it's not the fiber that matters, but where that fiber comes from and a host of other concerns about gut health. Some of those theories revolve around acidity, ph balance, glyphosate, SAD, too little vegetation, too much fat, and so on and so forth.  

Wahl Protocol might be of interest to you.

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I have never heard of Akkermansia muciniphila before. Hmm. As a young child, I was on antibiotics a lot; I have also had bouts as an adult, especially about 8 years ago due to repeated respiratory infections. This has me really curious--are there food sources that help boost this bacteria, and if so, what are they?

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