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ADD resources for older teen

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What resources might you suggest for a newly 18 year old struggling to manage her ADD?
She is on a stimulant med that is quite helpful, but she needs some more tools and strategies to supplement the meds.  We've discovered that my brain works too differently from hers for me to helpful for what she needs right now - she really needs the perspective of those with lived experience and a similar brain wiring.

(Feel free to share via PM if you don't want to talk publicly!)

Thank you!!

 

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I suggest starting listening to the ADHD telesummit talks right now.  

https://www.succeedwithadhdtelesummit.com/wednesday/

if you have time for just two of the Wednesday talks try Alan Brown’s on beating procrastination. And Lynn Miner Rosen (name might be off slightly) 

the one about teens starting college for both of you 

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I’ll post you the phone in numbers in case you can’t get registered until tomorrow.

 

these talks are on until 8am Pacific time tomorrow, then a new set of 5 comes. 

Replay By Phone: Dial: (206) 402-0103Replay ID: 116-298-345#   Teens starting college

 

 

 

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Run Your Day with Less Procrastination, More Prioritization, and Better Time Management

Presenter: Alan P. Brown

(I find his material almost always helpful. And he was how I learned of this telesummit series)

 

 

Replay By Phone: Dial: (206) 402-0103Replay ID:115-022-217#

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Heathermomster on LC did the Sklar course here and says her ds got a lot of good from it https://executivefunctioningsuccess.com

Beyond that, give her tech. Not tech to distraction, but tech to keep track of things and keep organized. Alexa products in her room so she can just say and it makes lists, reminders, alarms, iphone/laptop that sync for calendars and alarms, products with alarms (fitbit, apple watch, whatever)...

You can also hire an educational therapist for her to work with. There's a certification process and they're sometimes hard to find. A psych who does CBT can be good too. The educational therapist will consult maybe 30 minutes a week and help her get her world in order, problem solve. 

Is she getting ready to graduate? Going to work a job or go to college? The college can provide academic support as well, doing academic coaching, especially that first year. So it's not tutoring her subjects but helping her do the EF and get it organized and keep on track and problem solve.

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My daughter loves the How to ADHD series on Youtube.  Also the book Faster Than Normal by Peter Shankman.  

She used the tech to organize but now has switched to a bullet journal -- she says that she does her best planning on paper, and that she had too many schedules to juggle and it wasn't clear enough with tech.  She has colored tabs on the bullet journal and has multiple spreads to help her with executive functioning. For instance, a page for every step of her morning -- she takes her meds right away and then looks at the list.  She has prepped everything the night before and then goes through the list before leaving for work.  However she does have an app for an alarm that is VERY loud and has to be shaken to be turned off. That has helped too.

The How to ADHD videos routines video was the most helpful to her.  

I checked out Smart but Scattered for her but that was before she was diagnosed and she was very against the idea that she had ADHD. So she wouldn't read it:)

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27 minutes ago, SanDiegoMom in VA said:

My daughter loves the How to ADHD series on Youtube.  Also the book Faster Than Normal by Peter Shankman.  

She used the tech to organize but now has switched to a bullet journal -- she says that she does her best planning on paper, and that she had too many schedules to juggle and it wasn't clear enough with tech.  She has colored tabs on the bullet journal and has multiple spreads to help her with executive functioning. For instance, a page for every step of her morning -- she takes her meds right away and then looks at the list.  She has prepped everything the night before and then goes through the list before leaving for work.  However she does have an app for an alarm that is VERY loud and has to be shaken to be turned off. That has helped too.

The How to ADHD videos routines video was the most helpful to her.  

I checked out Smart but Scattered for her but that was before she was diagnosed and she was very against the idea that she had ADHD. So she wouldn't read it:)

So interesting on the bullet journal! I will go look for me. Dies she use the companion app?

Edited by PeterPan
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9 hours ago, PeterPan said:

So interesting on the bullet journal! I will go look for me. Dies she use the companion app?

I will have to ask her! I know she downloaded it, because it showed up on my phone and we have family purchases:) . But I don't know if she uses it. 

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On 7/18/2019 at 8:03 PM, SanDiegoMom in VA said:

My daughter loves the How to ADHD series on Youtube.  

 

I was going to suggest this too. Ds, who has ADHD and take medication for it, also struggles. He likes those videos. They're also helpful for those of us who love someone with ADHD because it helps us learn what it's like for them.

Edited: It's ds not dh, who has ADHD. 🙂 

Edited by Lady Florida.
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An ADD coach or teen support group if there are good ones in your area might help.

 I have found some books helpful.

including neither specific to teens, nor to ADD, but Atomic Habits.

Systems.

Mindfullness.

 

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IIRC, Seth Perler has some strategies for weekly checkins--it could be adapted for more independent use with teens. It's like a weekly reset/plan for the week.

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Not necessarily the exact book that follows, but something in the meditation / mindfulness realm may be worth trying because studies seem to indicate actual changes and improvements—not just medicating symptoms.  Similarly a nutrition and supplement adjunctive approach might be worthwhile for providing the building blocks that such changes might need.

Meditation Interventions to Rewire the Brain: Integrating Neuroscience Strategies for ADHD, Anxiety, Depression & PTSD https://www.amazon.com/dp/1683730720/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_eDOmDbWRW73QB

I’d probably go with a book by Christopher Eillard on how to actually do meditation.  Also I like Willard’s TedX and similar talks on YouTube 

Edited by Pen
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Another thing is to realize that ADD is different for different people.  So exploring ADD YouTube videos and seeing what helps her personally could be good.  Or exploring websites and blogs and seeing what could help her.  Because what helps one person may be different from what helps her.

that said, with add one can get distracted and into squirrel herding with YouTubes and Blogs and so on.  a ton of resources and sites and ideas that adds to attention fragmentation and can add to feeling of overwhelm 

I personally Sometimes (usually) find that just working on improving ONE thing that’s causing problems can be most helpful.  Like developing a habit of putting keys on a particular hook on wall, say, if lost keys is a problem can be extremely helpful.

Or just working on using a calendar daily if that seems like it would be the most help

 

 

 

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Maggie Wray is another name in the teens/you g adults with adhd field

There’s a long YouTube video with her about how to help launch your Adhd daughter. 

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My DS took the Sklar class prior to and during the 1st semester of college where he was introduced to specific time management strategies.

Being ADHD inattentive, DS presents in a semi-aroused state, and he cannot take stim meds due to some other health issues.  By late 10th grade through the 11th grade, he worked with an amazing CBT for EF issues every 3 or so weeks.  While home from college this summer, he  worked with the CBT again.  Maybe check out the following thread:

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Heathermomster
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On 7/18/2019 at 5:03 PM, SanDiegoMom in VA said:

I checked out Smart but Scattered for her but that was before she was diagnosed and she was very against the idea that she had ADHD. So she wouldn't read it:)

 

On Smart but Scattered, I’ve tried numerous time’s to read them both for myself and to try to help adhd kids. I can’t do it.

It feels overwhelming to me. 

 I m not sure if I cannot concentrate on it or feel triggered by it or what, but it doesn’t fit the way my own brain works.

Otoh many people find it fantastic!

 

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18 hours ago, Pen said:

 

 

On Smart but Scattered, I’ve tried numerous time’s to read them both for myself and to try to help adhd kids. I can’t do it.

It feels overwhelming to me. 

 I m not sure if I cannot concentrate on it or feel triggered by it or what, but it doesn’t fit the way my own brain works.

Otoh many people find it fantastic!

 

We did not find that book helpful. I don't know why.  Everyone else seems to love it.

My kid's neurospsych recommended the Barkley books, such as Taking Charge of Adult ADHD (Link is to Amazon)

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42 minutes ago, marbel said:

We did not find that book helpful. I don't know why.  Everyone else seems to love it.

My kid's neurospsych recommended the Barkley books, such as Taking Charge of Adult ADHD (Link is to Amazon)

 

I don’t know why everyone else seems to love Smart But Scattered—. Maybe it works well for NT parents to guide ADHD kids.

For myself the single most helpful book has been:

https://www.amazon.com/Your-Better-Using-Strategies-Adult/dp/1937600432

it keeps to a simple steps approach and the book itself is ADHD friendly in my opinion in terms of page layout (I have paperback form), and not too much at a time.  

ETA - But I’m not sure it would appeal to an 18 yo. 

Edited by Pen
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On 7/21/2019 at 2:31 PM, Pen said:

For myself the single most helpful book has been:

https://www.amazon.com/Your-Better-Using-Strategies-Adult/dp/1937600432

it keeps to a simple steps approach and the book itself is ADHD friendly in my opinion in terms of page layout (I have paperback form), and not too much at a time.  

ETA - But I’m not sure it would appeal to an 18 yo. 

That looks fantastic. Thank you! 

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