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I would love to hear from anyone currently homeschooling in the state of Ohio! Is homeschooling in Ohio "easy," legally speaking? (Is testing required?) If anyone could please explain, in a nutshell, what is legally required in Ohio, I would greatly appreciate it! I've done some cursory Googling, of course, but it would be so nice to hear about it first-hand. From what I understand, it looks like a portfolio can be evaluated annually by a certified teacher, but how do you find a suitable teacher to work with? Would my local public school set me up with one? (Side note: I actually used to be a certified teacher in my current state before having children/homeschooling, but I'm guessing I can't self-evaluate?) 

Context: For the past several years, my husband and I have contemplated moving to a different state. We've considered several states and are currently considering those in the midwest. Columbus, Ohio looks appealing to us for a variety of reasons. (We currently live on the east coast and the cost of living in our area is out of control. We've rented forever and we're hoping to buy our first home next year, but we could buy one in the midwest for literally a third or a quarter of the price of what an equivalent home would cost here, so we're just not sure how much longer it will make sense for us to stay in this area, you know? Our oldest is only going into 7th grade, but college isn't that far out, financially speaking, and we're thinking we'd rather put our money towards saving for college than the insane cost of living here. Plus, we're also feeling a general pull toward an environment that isn't so "East Coast Rat Race," if that makes sense. We've lived here for nearly 20 years and are feeling ready for something new/simpler/more peaceful.)  

That said, I am a bit hesitant to move because I've been homeschooling very happily in my current area for seven years now. I know the drill, I am very comfortable with it, and I find it very easy: just two portfolio evaluations a year with the county, and no mandatory standardized testing. But, as I said before, moving just makes so much more sense financially, and it might be exciting to embark on a new adventure as a family. So, I'm really torn. But we know we definitely don't want to move to a state where homeschooling is more difficult (regulation-wise), so I was hoping to get a sense of things from someone who currently lives in Ohio. 

Bonus question if you live in Columbus: Is there a vibrant homeschool community there? Our homeschool community is wonderful here, so that's another thing I'm really hesitant to give up.

Thanks so much for reading; I appreciate any feedback anyone might have about Ohio, or any general insight about moving to a new state while homeschooling. 

Edited by EKT

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Oh forget Columbus, you need to come to the Dayton area. 😀  There's a bunch of us here.

Ohio homeschooling is pretty easy.  Once you get here, you send notice to the superintendent of district you live in.  This notice includes a list of intended resources, and a promise to provide X number of hours of instruction.  I think the number is 900, but it doesn't really matter, cause you don't have to track it.

At the end of the year, you have to EITHER do a standardized test OR have a portfolio reviewed by a certified teacher.  They write up a statement that says your kid has progressed within his/her abilities.  The next year, when you send notice, you send that statement.  I found our teacher online after following a recommendation here.....https://ohiohomeschool.blogspot.com/

She was SUPER helpful as I got our stuff put together for the first time (I was previously in Indiana which has basically no requirements.)  And I didn't have to provide much, basically wrote up what we did for each subject, provided a couple of samples from the beginning to the end of the year, and then a few pics.  

Other folks here that I have met do the standardized testing and that's fairly easy too, from what I understand, though they could explain better.  Portfolios are just more comfortable for me.

 

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54 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Oh forget Columbus, you need to come to the Dayton area. 😀  There's a bunch of us here.

Ohio homeschooling is pretty easy.  Once you get here, you send notice to the superintendent of district you live in.  This notice includes a list of intended resources, and a promise to provide X number of hours of instruction.  I think the number is 900, but it doesn't really matter, cause you don't have to track it.

At the end of the year, you have to EITHER do a standardized test OR have a portfolio reviewed by a certified teacher.  They write up a statement that says your kid has progressed within his/her abilities.  The next year, when you send notice, you send that statement.  I found our teacher online after following a recommendation here.....https://ohiohomeschool.blogspot.com/

She was SUPER helpful as I got our stuff put together for the first time (I was previously in Indiana which has basically no requirements.)  And I didn't have to provide much, basically wrote up what we did for each subject, provided a couple of samples from the beginning to the end of the year, and then a few pics.  

Other folks here that I have met do the standardized testing and that's fairly easy too, from what I understand, though they could explain better.  Portfolios are just more comfortable for me.

 

 Thank you so much for the information! (And thank you for the link; I bookmarked it.) 

If you don't mind me asking a follow-up question: Do the teachers who do assessments charge you a fee for the service? (I'm curious if the teachers are independent contractors, performing this service as a personal home/side business? Or, are they active teachers currently teaching in the state, who do homeschool assessments as part of their job?) 

I agree; portfolios are more comfortable for me, too. It's what we've always done here. (I'm not afraid of testing or anything; I'm sure my kids would score fine, but I don't want to start teaching to a test over the course of the school year, you know? I like being able to write things up and evaluate in a more narrative way, etc.) Ohio actually sounds easier in some ways than my state, since the assessments are just once per year (in my state, there are two per year, but they are very easy.) Anyway, this is encouraging--thank you so much for taking the time to respond! 

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4 minutes ago, EKT said:

 Thank you so much for the information! (And thank you for the link; I bookmarked it.) 

If you don't mind me asking a follow-up question: Do the teachers who do assessments charge you a fee for the service? (I'm curious if the teachers are independent contractors, performing this service as a personal home/side business? Or, are they active teachers currently teaching in the state, who do homeschool assessments as part of their job?) 

I agree; portfolios are more comfortable for me, too. It's what we've always done here. (I'm not afraid of testing or anything; I'm sure my kids would score fine, but I don't want to start teaching to a test over the course of the school year, you know? I like being able to write things up and evaluate in a more narrative way, etc.) Ohio actually sounds easier in some ways than my state, since the assessments are just once per year (in my state, there are two per year, but they are very easy.) Anyway, this is encouraging--thank you so much for taking the time to respond! 

Yes, it's my experience they charge.  I paid $70 for 2 portfolios.  The teacher has to have a current license, but I don't think they have to be "actively" teaching.  The one I used included her teaching license number in the statement she sent back.  So I suppose it could be both a teacher who is actually employed by a public school, AND also providing the evaluation as a side job.  Or it could be someone who has a current license but doesn't currently teach in a school.  

Some evaluators will require more some will require less.  Some will provide notes and information to you, some just do the review and send back the required paperwork.

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9 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Yes, it's my experience they charge.  I paid $70 for 2 portfolios.  The teacher has to have a current license, but I don't think they have to be "actively" teaching.  The one I used included her teaching license number in the statement she sent back.  So I suppose it could be both a teacher who is actually employed by a public school, AND also providing the evaluation as a side job.  Or it could be someone who has a current license but doesn't currently teach in a school.  

Some evaluators will require more some will require less.  Some will provide notes and information to you, some just do the review and send back the required paperwork.

Thank you again for the information!

It's interesting to me in that it all sounds pretty subjective and that there is a fee attached, but as we're searching around at different places to live, I am learning that the rules vary wildly from state to state! 

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Requirements vary a LOT.  In Indiana, all I had to do was send a letter when I pulled my kids.  Boom done.  Not curriculum, no oversight, no assessments.  Just done.  The superintendent *could* have requested documentation that we did school for the required number of days (ie self kept attendance records) but as far as I know no one ever actually requested to see attendance records.  

Edited by happysmileylady
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8 minutes ago, happysmileylady said:

Requirements vary a LOT.  In Indiana, all I had to do was send a letter when I pulled my kids.  Boom done.  Not curriculum, no oversight, no assessments.  Just done.  The superintendent *could* have requested documentation that we did school for the required number of days (ie self kept attendance records) but as far as I know no one ever actually requested to see attendance records.  

We're actually considering Indiana as well--specifically because it seems so free and painless for homeschooling! It's very tempting, lol. But there's so much about Ohio overall that appeals to us, it's definitely at the top of our hypothetical list at the moment.  Lots to think about! I feel confident that I can play the game and make things work wherever we land, but it's very helpful to get a sense of things from other homeschoolers!

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5 minutes ago, EKT said:

We're actually considering Indiana as well--specifically because it seems so free and painless for homeschooling! It's very tempting, lol. But there's so much about Ohio overall that appeals to us, it's definitely at the top of our hypothetical list at the moment.  Lots to think about! I feel confident that I can play the game and make things work wherever we land, but it's very helpful to get a sense of things from other homeschoolers!

I prefer Ohio to Indiana in terms of place to live.   And in particular, we really really are happy with the particular area of Ohio we live in.  Southwest Ohio is a really cool area to live in.  

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Hey! Cincinnati homeschool mom here. 

Just to reiterate what was said already: only one notification per year with a copy of your letter from your assessor or your standardized test result (composite score only). Plus an intended list of curriculum for the required categories for reference purposes (you are not going to be held to it--just do your best. I don't include a lot of detail on mine. Some categories I just write "library books and other supplemental material.") You will also need a notification form such as this one here: https://www.cheohome.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Notification-Form-4-2019.pdf  (This lists the categories required to be covered in case you are wondering).  So, my annual notification consists of: notice of intent form, copy of list of intended curriculum, and blacked out IOWA score sheet with only composite score showing (or my letter from my portfolio assessor). 

My kids are rising 7th and rising 8th. We started homeschooling when my oldest was in 1st.  We did portfolio reviews for many years and then about three years ago I started doing the IOWA at home. One year I actually did both because I wanted to talk to the reviewer about some things. It's up to you.  If you do testing, you just have to submit the composite score (none of the other supporting scores). Ohio requires a certain minimum score but it is super low--I want to say 30? 

As mentioned, there is an annual hours requirement but they don't require you to track it. I do keep records of what I do each day just in case (checklist kind of thing) but I have never been contacted.

As far as reception by the public school to your notice of intent to homeschool, that is very much a YMMV issue. There are rarely problems here, and there are enough homeschoolers in Ohio that if there are, someone reports to HSLDA and it gets fixed pretty quick. Make sure you send it to the superintendent of the school district in which you live and send it certified mail, return receipt.  Here's a summary of your notice requirements: https://www.cheohome.org/join-us/get-started/notification/

I am (obviously) a Cincinnati native so I am pretty biased to our part of the state.  I went to college in Dayton. Dayton really outdoes us in terms of free parks.  And, my friend from Dayton says, "we invented everything." It's an exaggeration of course, but a lot of first things were invented in Dayton. Unfortunately I don't know much about Columbus from a homeschool perspective, but this will bump the thread for you.  😃 

Edited by cintinative
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14 minutes ago, cintinative said:

Hey! Cincinnati homeschool mom here. 

Just to reiterate what was said already: only one notification per year with a copy of your letter from your assessor or your standardized test result (composite score only). Plus an intended list of curriculum for the required categories for reference purposes (you are not going to be held to it--just do your best. I don't include a lot of detail on mine. Some categories I just write "library books and other supplemental material.") You will also need a notification form such as this one here: https://www.cheohome.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Notification-Form-4-2019.pdf  (This lists the categories required to be covered in case you are wondering).  So, my annual notification consists of: notice of intent form, copy of list of intended curriculum, and blacked out IOWA score sheet with only composite score showing (or my letter from my portfolio assessor). 

My kids are rising 7th and rising 8th. We started homeschooling when my oldest was in 1st.  We did portfolio reviews for many years and then about three years ago I started doing the IOWA at home. One year I actually did both because I wanted to talk to the reviewer about some things. It's up to you.  If you do testing, you just have to submit the composite score (none of the other supporting scores). Ohio requires a certain minimum score but it is super low--I want to say 30? 

As mentioned, there is an annual hours requirement but they don't require you to track it. I do keep records of what I do each day just in case (checklist kind of thing) but I have never been contacted.

As far as reception by the public school to your notice of intent to homeschool, that is very much a YMMV issue. There are rarely problems here, and there are enough homeschoolers in Ohio that if there are, someone reports to HSLDA and it gets fixed pretty quick. Make sure you send it to the superintendent of the school district in which you live and send it certified mail, return receipt.  Here's a summary of your notice requirements: https://www.cheohome.org/join-us/get-started/notification/

I am (obviously) a Cincinnati native so I am pretty biased to our part of the state.  I went to college in Dayton. Dayton really outdoes us in terms of free parks.  And, my friend from Dayton says, "we invented everything." It's an exaggeration of course, but a lot of first things were invented in Dayton. Unfortunately I don't know much about Columbus from a homeschool perspective, but this will bump the thread for you.  😃 

Wow, thank you so much for taking the time to write up all of this information and provide links! So, so appreciated! 

And I didn't realize that if I did the testing option I could administer the IOWA myself at home. Interesting! Something to think about. Well, this is all great, helpful info. Thanks so much!! 

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18 minutes ago, cintinative said:

Hey! Cincinnati homeschool mom here. 

Just to reiterate what was said already: only one notification per year with a copy of your letter from your assessor or your standardized test result (composite score only). Plus an intended list of curriculum for the required categories for reference purposes (you are not going to be held to it--just do your best. I don't include a lot of detail on mine. Some categories I just write "library books and other supplemental material.") You will also need a notification form such as this one here: https://www.cheohome.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Notification-Form-4-2019.pdf  (This lists the categories required to be covered in case you are wondering).  So, my annual notification consists of: notice of intent form, copy of list of intended curriculum, and blacked out IOWA score sheet with only composite score showing (or my letter from my portfolio assessor). 

My kids are rising 7th and rising 8th. We started homeschooling when my oldest was in 1st.  We did portfolio reviews for many years and then about three years ago I started doing the IOWA at home. One year I actually did both because I wanted to talk to the reviewer about some things. It's up to you.  If you do testing, you just have to submit the composite score (none of the other supporting scores). Ohio requires a certain minimum score but it is super low--I want to say 30? 

As mentioned, there is an annual hours requirement but they don't require you to track it. I do keep records of what I do each day just in case (checklist kind of thing) but I have never been contacted.

As far as reception by the public school to your notice of intent to homeschool, that is very much a YMMV issue. There are rarely problems here, and there are enough homeschoolers in Ohio that if there are, someone reports to HSLDA and it gets fixed pretty quick. Make sure you send it to the superintendent of the school district in which you live and send it certified mail, return receipt.  Here's a summary of your notice requirements: https://www.cheohome.org/join-us/get-started/notification/

I am (obviously) a Cincinnati native so I am pretty biased to our part of the state.  I went to college in Dayton. Dayton really outdoes us in terms of free parks.  And, my friend from Dayton says, "we invented everything." It's an exaggeration of course, but a lot of first things were invented in Dayton. Unfortunately I don't know much about Columbus from a homeschool perspective, but this will bump the thread for you.  😃 

😂 Oh no, everything was invented in Dayton lol

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10 minutes ago, EKT said:

Wow, thank you so much for taking the time to write up all of this information and provide links! So, so appreciated! 

And I didn't realize that if I did the testing option I could administer the IOWA myself at home. Interesting! Something to think about. Well, this is all great, helpful info. Thanks so much!! 

 

I get the IOWA from Seton or BJU. You need to have a bachelor's degree to administer it at home. 

You can do the CAT online or on paper (not sure if you need a degree for the paper version)

Or you can do the Stanford online or with a local group. The local Classical Conversations group here organizes a test date for the Stanford.  Some co-ops offer the IOWA in a group setting as well. 

We have only ever done the IOWA. 

 

P.S. If I can bias you toward our part of the state, we have a really excellent Children's Hospital in Cincinnati. One of the top in the nation for many disciplines. In fairness, I have also heard good things about Columbus Children's.  A children's hospital is not something you want to need, but when you need it, you are so grateful it is there. 

Edited by cintinative
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1 hour ago, cintinative said:

 

I get the IOWA from Seton or BJU. You need to have a bachelor's degree to administer it at home. 

You can do the CAT online or on paper (not sure if you need a degree for the paper version)

Or you can do the Stanford online or with a local group. The local Classical Conversations group here organizes a test date for the Stanford.  Some co-ops offer the IOWA in a group setting as well. 

We have only ever done the IOWA. 

 

P.S. If I can bias you toward our part of the state, we have a really excellent Children's Hospital in Cincinnati. One of the top in the nation for many disciplines. In fairness, I have also heard good things about Columbus Children's.  A children's hospital is not something you want to need, but when you need it, you are so grateful it is there. 

Good to know re: the tests! (I do have college degrees, so it's helpful to know that testing at home is an option.) 

And thank you for the general Ohio info; we are definitely exploring all the major cities! 

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3 hours ago, EKT said:

We're actually considering Indiana as well

Oh my, since all my family lives in Indiana I'll just say how much I would NOT move there by choice, lol. They're very different places. (economies, roads, personalities, etc.) Definitely visit.

So I think Ohio is just about utopia (imho, haha), so of course you should move here. Thing is, if I were moving here, don't know that C-bus is where I'd want to be. It's busy, busy, busy. What do you like to do? Ohio is HUGE, so if you can be anywhere how about getting near what you like to do? You want to go to the Lake on the weekends? You want cultural? You want to hike and bike trails? 

If you can be anywhere, get out of the city a bit would be my advice. 

And yes, tons of homeschoolers. Now I think straight homeschooling (not charters) has taken a hit everywhere. But in the area where I am (not in the city), we have at least 3, now 4 active homeschool groups.

Yes, our laws sound less intrusive than yours. 

Ok, so you can check DE laws for Indiana because I don't know. For Ohio they're pretty generous. If you're enrolled in the ps, it's carte blanche DE starting in 7th, all you want. For homeschoolers they have some caps because of budget restrictions, but still you'll get some, including summer, starting in 7th. And that's online, state, anything, so long as it's in Ohio and taking the $$. So like say you want Cedarville, you can DE Cedarville. 

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I live in the Columbus area and love it!  I grew up in Cleveland, but much prefer Columbus and have been here over 25 years. It has grown a lot since I moved here. 

Yes, it's busy, but there are a lot of opportunities, classes,  co-ops, field trips, museums, etc. for a homeschooling family. The libraries and park systems are fantastic!! 

The homeschooling requirements seem very low-key to me, although there are some individual school districts that can be difficult to work with. However, I think that if you get your paperwork in before school starts and you give them the information required by law, then all will be well. 

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5 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Oh my, since all my family lives in Indiana I'll just say how much I would NOT move there by choice, lol. They're very different places. (economies, roads, personalities, etc.) Definitely visit.

So I think Ohio is just about utopia (imho, haha), so of course you should move here. Thing is, if I were moving here, don't know that C-bus is where I'd want to be. It's busy, busy, busy. What do you like to do? Ohio is HUGE, so if you can be anywhere how about getting near what you like to do? You want to go to the Lake on the weekends? You want cultural? You want to hike and bike trails? 

If you can be anywhere, get out of the city a bit would be my advice. . If you're enrolled in the ps, it's carte blanche DE starting in 7th, all you want. For homeschoolers they have some caps because of budget restrictions, but still you'll get some, including summer, starting in 7th. And that's online, state, anything, so long as it's in Ohio and taking the $$. So like say you want Cedarville, you can DE Cedarville. 

 

My sons grew up NE Ohio in a semi-rural area and moved to Columbus for college and all love it there.  So much to do with a low cost of living.  One moved to Indiana and didn't expect to like it but he is very happy.

Funding for homeschoolers in OH for DE is pretty minimal right now but there is legislation that will hopefully pass and add a lot more to the budget.  For right now, I think students up through 10th grade only receive four credits (not including textbooks), 11th grade receives 8 credits, and 12th grade receives 12 credits.  Better than nothing but not the great deal students receive in ps, which is up to 30 credits with free textbooks.  We actually enrolled our dd in ps just to get the free DE since she goes full time.  She'll graduate from ps without ever having taken a class there.  

 

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@kbutton  @Arctic Mama  care to chime in? I know Arctic Mama moved here from Alaska. 

on the DE thing, even if you don't get your credits paid for by College Credit Plus, you still qualify for the reduced cost credits. Where we are, Sinclair is very inexpensive--much less than an online class provider if you are paying your own way. 

ETA: apparently the reduced cost credits are not for every college state-wide.  I know that UC Blue Ash credits are more expensive than Sinclair's but apparently some schools don't discount at all. See Kassia's post. Sorry about that!!

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1 hour ago, cintinative said:

 

on the DE thing, even if you don't get your credits paid for by College Credit Plus, you still qualify for the reduced cost credits. Where we are, Sinclair is very inexpensive--much less than an online class provider if you are paying your own way. 

 

It really depends on the college.  Where we live, (NE Ohio) my dd attends a community college and regional university campus - neither offers a discount.  

 

 

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7 minutes ago, Kassia said:

 

It really depends on the college.  Where we live, (NE Ohio) my dd attends a community college and regional university campus - neither offers a discount.  

 

 

Wow. That's so interesting. Good to know. 

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13 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Oh my, since all my family lives in Indiana I'll just say how much I would NOT move there by choice, lol. They're very different places. (economies, roads, personalities, etc.) Definitely visit.

So I think Ohio is just about utopia (imho, haha), so of course you should move here. Thing is, if I were moving here, don't know that C-bus is where I'd want to be. It's busy, busy, busy. What do you like to do? Ohio is HUGE, so if you can be anywhere how about getting near what you like to do? You want to go to the Lake on the weekends? You want cultural? You want to hike and bike trails? 

If you can be anywhere, get out of the city a bit would be my advice. 

And yes, tons of homeschoolers. Now I think straight homeschooling (not charters) has taken a hit everywhere. But in the area where I am (not in the city), we have at least 3, now 4 active homeschool groups.

Yes, our laws sound less intrusive than yours. 

Ok, so you can check DE laws for Indiana because I don't know. For Ohio they're pretty generous. If you're enrolled in the ps, it's carte blanche DE starting in 7th, all you want. For homeschoolers they have some caps because of budget restrictions, but still you'll get some, including summer, starting in 7th. And that's online, state, anything, so long as it's in Ohio and taking the $$. So like say you want Cedarville, you can DE Cedarville. 

Thank you so much for this info! (And yes, from the research we've done so far, Ohio really does seem like utopia, lol.) I did not know that about DE in Ohio--that is great!

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11 hours ago, aaplank said:

I live in the Columbus area and love it!  I grew up in Cleveland, but much prefer Columbus and have been here over 25 years. It has grown a lot since I moved here. 

Yes, it's busy, but there are a lot of opportunities, classes,  co-ops, field trips, museums, etc. for a homeschooling family. The libraries and park systems are fantastic!! 

The homeschooling requirements seem very low-key to me, although there are some individual school districts that can be difficult to work with. However, I think that if you get your paperwork in before school starts and you give them the information required by law, then all will be well. 

Yay--thank you for responding from Columbus! This is all really encouraging! I have heard the libraries and parks are great, which is so important to us. Thanks so much for chiming in!

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7 hours ago, Kassia said:

 

My sons grew up NE Ohio in a semi-rural area and moved to Columbus for college and all love it there.  So much to do with a low cost of living.  One moved to Indiana and didn't expect to like it but he is very happy.

Funding for homeschoolers in OH for DE is pretty minimal right now but there is legislation that will hopefully pass and add a lot more to the budget.  For right now, I think students up through 10th grade only receive four credits (not including textbooks), 11th grade receives 8 credits, and 12th grade receives 12 credits.  Better than nothing but not the great deal students receive in ps, which is up to 30 credits with free textbooks.  We actually enrolled our dd in ps just to get the free DE since she goes full time.  She'll graduate from ps without ever having taken a class there.  

 

Yes, the cost of living just seems amazing compared to the East Coast. 

And that is fascinating to me that your DD is technically enrolled in ps, but is full DE. I had never even considered that sort of thing as a possibility! Thanks so much for sharing!

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If you know you want to DE, you might try to plunk yourself within 5 minutes of an OSU branch. You could literally map them out and see what you're thinking. Or nuts, move over by Cedarville, haha. That would be the bomb, wow. I didn't send my dd to anything with OSU and wouldn't, but I'm just saying it's a thing people do. Around here it's more common for people to send their kids to the technical college for their basic DE classes (english, speech, etc.). The reciprocity in Ohio guarantees that the branch school course will transfer within the state school system, no problem. So in our area, that's where the high school kids tend to go. The OSU branches can be more edgy with objectionable materials, a mix of adult learners, maybe stuff you don't want into. 

So the other thing in our area and in Cbus is the high school specific co-ops. There's one that meets in Pataskala (east of Cbus) that is high school specific. There's a classical bent group on the north side, more like Westerville/Sunbury. There are groups I haven't checked into but I hear wind of. So if you think you want to connect with a group like that, maybe move toward that area. Like if you're on the west side of Cbus and want to go to that Pataskala co-op group (that really is worth driving for), that would be unrealistic maybe, as it could be 40 minutes. Map it out, but that's the kind of thing that can happen. So you buy into a nice part of Cbus (say Grove City) and realize you're maybe on the opposite side of town from where you want to be. 

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Here, just to give you an example, you can get into a 4 bedroom, 3 bath ranch in Granville, be 30 minutes from downtown Cbus, 15 minutes from that high school co-op, 14 miles of bike trails, small university town. $340k. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/19-Brecon-Cir-Granville-OH-43023/74338776_zpid/ 

And maybe you'll like the bustle of Columbus, lol. 

Edited by PeterPan

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15 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Thing is, if I were moving here, don't know that C-bus is where I'd want to be. It's busy, busy, busy. 

I find Columbus overwhelming, and it gets "bigger" every year. I live in SW Ohio between Dayton and Cincinnati.

I think homeschooling is very easy here. I have less luck finding groups, but that is because my kids are 2e, and I have to do enough individualizing that bending to (often arbitrary) co-op structures/curriculum choices is very hard with my kids. 

If your kids are gifted and 14 or under, Cincinnati has an EXCELLENT program called The Super Saturday program that provides gifted enrichment of all kinds. The classes run in short bursts (like 6 weeks), so they aren't a huge commitment, but you are getting really quality programming. It's also not an expensive program at all. We've paid more for Y programs that were not nearly as awesome. https://www.supersaturday.org/ There are plenty of opportunities for parent involvement, and you cannot work with a nicer group of people if you opt to get involved. For the 14 and over crowd, they have (I think it's still going), I teen leadership/mentoring program where the teens help in classes but learn some people skills and some leadership skills as well. They aren't just thrown in a class to volunteer.

I will also say that Cincinnati Children's has some stuff they are truly excellent at. We visit their cardiac genetics department yearly, and they are wonderful.

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If you are into using the Y and Y programs, there are a lot of facilities in Ohio. We use the Countryside YMCA for homeschool music (on Facebook--Southwest Ohio Homeschool Music Academy). They have a program that includes band, strings, and choir. It's one of the largest YMCAs in the country. 

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26 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

There's a classical bent group on the north side, more like Westerville/Sunbury. 

 

I really wish we had a high school classical bent group here in Cincinnati. We really don't, unless you count PEP which is more of a private school feel (and can be expensive). 

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28 minutes ago, kbutton said:

 

If your kids are gifted and 14 or under, Cincinnati has an EXCELLENT program called The Super Saturday program that provides gifted enrichment of all kinds. The classes run in short bursts (like 6 weeks), so they aren't a huge commitment, but you are getting really quality programming. It's also not an expensive program at all. We've paid more for Y programs that were not nearly as awesome. https://www.supersaturday.org/ There are plenty of opportunities for parent involvement, and you cannot work with a nicer group of people if you opt to get involved. For the 14 and over crowd, they have (I think it's still going), I teen leadership/mentoring program where the teens help in classes but learn some people skills and some leadership skills as well. They aren't just thrown in a class to volunteer.

 

I did not know about this! Thanks for sharing. 

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57 minutes ago, PeterPan said:

If you know you want to DE, you might try to plunk yourself within 5 minutes of an OSU branch. You could literally map them out and see what you're thinking. 

 

If you are moving with DE in mind, I would recommend moving closer to Columbus State Community College because they will have a better course selection than an OSU branch.  We went through this a few years ago when we were thinking of moving and needed a DE school that would provide higher level math courses.  I don't think OSU branches would offer that (I could be wrong, though).  There were other classes, too, that we were thinking of that would be difficult to enroll in if we moved, which is part of reason we chose to stay put until dd graduates.  Our CC has most of the classes dd needs and the regional campus of a different university offers some, too.  

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55 minutes ago, Kassia said:

 

If you are moving with DE in mind, I would recommend moving closer to Columbus State Community College because they will have a better course selection than an OSU branch.  We went through this a few years ago when we were thinking of moving and needed a DE school that would provide higher level math courses.  I don't think OSU branches would offer that (I could be wrong, though).  There were other classes, too, that we were thinking of that would be difficult to enroll in if we moved, which is part of reason we chose to stay put until dd graduates.  Our CC has most of the classes dd needs and the regional campus of a different university offers some, too.  

Yes, I'm not yet sure if we would DE, but it's really great to have it as an option! So, it seems like Columbus State Community College is well-respected in the area? I've done some cursory reading about it on their website, etc., and from what I can tell, credits earned there would seamlessly transfer to OSU (or a similar 4-year institution), which is obviously a huge plus. (Even if we don't end up DE, I can definitely see us sending our girls to CSCC for their first two years of college and then transferring to OSU/similar, so buying a home in good proximity to CSCC would definitely be advantageous for that reason....) 

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1 hour ago, kbutton said:

If you are into using the Y and Y programs, there are a lot of facilities in Ohio. We use the Countryside YMCA for homeschool music (on Facebook--Southwest Ohio Homeschool Music Academy). They have a program that includes band, strings, and choir. It's one of the largest YMCAs in the country. 

This is awesome to know, too! Thank you!

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2 hours ago, kbutton said:

I find Columbus overwhelming, and it gets "bigger" every year. I live in SW Ohio between Dayton and Cincinnati.

I think homeschooling is very easy here. I have less luck finding groups, but that is because my kids are 2e, and I have to do enough individualizing that bending to (often arbitrary) co-op structures/curriculum choices is very hard with my kids. 

If your kids are gifted and 14 or under, Cincinnati has an EXCELLENT program called The Super Saturday program that provides gifted enrichment of all kinds. The classes run in short bursts (like 6 weeks), so they aren't a huge commitment, but you are getting really quality programming. It's also not an expensive program at all. We've paid more for Y programs that were not nearly as awesome. https://www.supersaturday.org/ There are plenty of opportunities for parent involvement, and you cannot work with a nicer group of people if you opt to get involved. For the 14 and over crowd, they have (I think it's still going), I teen leadership/mentoring program where the teens help in classes but learn some people skills and some leadership skills as well. They aren't just thrown in a class to volunteer.

I will also say that Cincinnati Children's has some stuff they are truly excellent at. We visit their cardiac genetics department yearly, and they are wonderful.

Awesome info, thank you!

 

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6 minutes ago, EKT said:

So, it seems like Columbus State Community College is well-respected in the area? 

 

I don't have personal experience with it but have heard a lot of good things.  We were considering moving close to CSCC so dd could attend when we were thinking of moving a few years ago.  I think many OSU students use it during the summer as well and transfer the credits.  

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2 hours ago, PeterPan said:

Here, just to give you an example, you can get into a 4 bedroom, 3 bath ranch in Granville, be 30 minutes from downtown Cbus, 15 minutes from that high school co-op, 14 miles of bike trails, small university town. $340k. https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/19-Brecon-Cir-Granville-OH-43023/74338776_zpid/ 

And maybe you'll like the bustle of Columbus, lol. 

Wow! Yes, I've been looking at all sorts of areas on Realtor.com, trying to get a sense of various Columbus suburbs and neighborhoods, etc. (We're hoping to take a long weekend visit to Columbus in the fall, to finally see some things in person, but for now, all I can do is internet recon, lol. This whole thread has been so helpful!)  

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3 hours ago, cintinative said:

 

I did not know about this! Thanks for sharing. 

Let me know if you sign up. My younger kiddo decided he'd like to return this year, and we will probably try to do 2 of the 3 sessions. 

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Looks like the other ladies have you covered regarding the rules for Ohio. I'd like to add that the person I use for assessments is in North Dayton and charges $10 per child $30 max for a family. She truly wants to help homeschoolers and doesn't believing in charging an arm and a leg for an assessment. She says that her job is to make sure each child is moving at their own ability not someone else's standards. She's great!

On another note, I'd like information on the Dayton groups or the ones that come to the Countryside YMCA as that is my hometown and we are members :)

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Central Ohio family here! I've been in the area for close to 20 years when I moved here for graduate school and ended up getting married and staying. It's a wonderful place to raise a family and very affordable, although the housing market is crazy right now! Lots of bidding wars, at least in my particular suburb.

We're embarking on our 3rd year homeschooling this year and have found there are lots and lots of opportunities for homeschoolers all over the city. We do not participate in a co-op, but there are lots to choose from, though I have found it difficult to find many classically-minded groups. This year a small group of us will be meeting together once a week to take our 3rd-4th graders through MP's Latina Christiana, which in addition to homeschool gym (Coach Q runs an awesome program all over the city, definitely look into it if you move here!) and some other activities gives us plenty of learning and socializing with other families. I don't have much experience with older homeschoolers since my oldest is only going to be in 3rd grade, so I can't give much guidance on Columbus State, but I have a close friend who teaches full-time there and my husband is an adjunct there and it seems like a good option from my limited experience.

In regards to notification laws, another option to the portfolio assessment or test scores is to form an 08 school, which is a non-chartered, non-tax supported school. It's different paperwork you need to send to the state DOE and your local school district, but you don't need to send in any form of assessment for your kids, just their names and addresses. If you aren't legally inclined, I'd suggest joining HSLDA for a year because they have guidance and form letters that follow the 08 school statute requirements. It's not hard, you just want to make sure you do it properly.

And I have to put in a plug for the children's hospital since I saw Cincy was mentioned lol - I lived at the one in Columbus a few years ago for 6 months while my baby boy was inpatient for chemo and a bone marrow transplant for high-risk leukemia and that place is amazing. They literally saved his life multiple times during treatment and we continue to go there frequently for all of his follow-up care. ☺️

Feel free to ask any more questions you may have about the area!!

 

 

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2 minutes ago, buckeyelaw said:

 

In regards to notification laws, another option to the portfolio assessment or test scores is to form an 08 school, which is a non-chartered, non-tax supported school. It's different paperwork you need to send to the state DOE and your local school district, but you don't need to send in any form of assessment for your kids, just their names and addresses. If you aren't legally inclined, I'd suggest joining HSLDA for a year because they have guidance and form letters that follow the 08 school statute requirements. It's not hard, you just want to make sure you do it properly.

And I have to put in a plug for the children's hospital since I saw Cincy was mentioned lol - I lived at the one in Columbus a few years ago for 6 months while my baby boy was inpatient for chemo and a bone marrow transplant for high-risk leukemia and that place is amazing. They literally saved his life multiple times during treatment and we continue to go there frequently for all of his follow-up care. ☺️

 

 

I've heard of the 08 schools but I know nothing about it.  Do you do this?

I am so sorry to hear about your son's leukemia.  I am so glad that your baby boy got help at Columbus. I have a friend that drives up to Columbus with her child because she finds they care for her son's particular medical needs better. It's so nice to have another good hospital only a couple of hours away if you want a second opinion or to explore a different treatment. What is your son's current status with regards to leukemia? That must have been so very scary for you all.

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14 minutes ago, cintinative said:

 

I've heard of the 08 schools but I know nothing about it.  Do you do this?

I am so sorry to hear about your son's leukemia.  I am so glad that your baby boy got help at Columbus. I have a friend that drives up to Columbus with her child because she finds they care for her son's particular medical needs better. It's so nice to have another good hospital only a couple of hours away if you want a second opinion or to explore a different treatment. What is your son's current status with regards to leukemia? That must have been so very scary for you all.

 

Right now, he's a completely healthy 3.5 year old, which is amazing. No late term effects from treatment yet, though we monitor him very closely. He's at high risk of relapse unfortunately, but he's been defying the odds for a couple of years now and I've got different prognoses from different doctors across the country but his particular cancer was so rare, I don't think anyone really knows what the future holds for him. We've learned to take each day as a gift with him; it's interesting what going through something like that does to your outlook on things! We actually went down to Cincy to talk with their transplant team because they have an amazing program there as well, but decided to stay up here since we have two other kids and I wanted to be close to them so I could see them occasionally while I stayed in the hospital. It's quite unusual to be so close to two great pediatric hospitals - we Ohioans are quite lucky in that respect!

I do the 08 school option. The statute is OAC 3301-35-08 if you want to read about it. Do not use the Ohio Department of Education website information as they request too much information from you that isn't required by the statute. I like the fact that I don't have to give any information to the district about my kids aside from their name and address. 

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11 minutes ago, buckeyelaw said:

 

Right now, he's a completely healthy 3.5 year old, which is amazing. No late term effects from treatment yet, though we monitor him very closely. He's at high risk of relapse unfortunately, but he's been defying the odds for a couple of years now and I've got different prognoses from different doctors across the country but his particular cancer was so rare, I

 

It is so good to hear this.  We have a friend whose son is now in his mid 20s who had relapsing leukemia. We are so grateful that he is doing well today. It truly is a scary journey. I don't think most of us comprehend what this means in terms of hours and days and weeks in the hospital for treatment (both for the child and the parents), the quarantine you must impose to prevent contracting the latest virus during your treatment, and then the ongoing checks which are scary of themselves because of the fear of recurrence.  Prayers for you.  

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On 7/4/2019 at 7:10 PM, Mom28kds said:

Looks like the other ladies have you covered regarding the rules for Ohio. I'd like to add that the person I use for assessments is in North Dayton and charges $10 per child $30 max for a family. She truly wants to help homeschoolers and doesn't believing in charging an arm and a leg for an assessment. She says that her job is to make sure each child is moving at their own ability not someone else's standards. She's great!

 

This is great to know; thank you! 

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3 hours ago, buckeyelaw said:

Central Ohio family here! I've been in the area for close to 20 years when I moved here for graduate school and ended up getting married and staying. It's a wonderful place to raise a family and very affordable, although the housing market is crazy right now! Lots of bidding wars, at least in my particular suburb.

We're embarking on our 3rd year homeschooling this year and have found there are lots and lots of opportunities for homeschoolers all over the city. We do not participate in a co-op, but there are lots to choose from, though I have found it difficult to find many classically-minded groups. This year a small group of us will be meeting together once a week to take our 3rd-4th graders through MP's Latina Christiana, which in addition to homeschool gym (Coach Q runs an awesome program all over the city, definitely look into it if you move here!) and some other activities gives us plenty of learning and socializing with other families. I don't have much experience with older homeschoolers since my oldest is only going to be in 3rd grade, so I can't give much guidance on Columbus State, but I have a close friend who teaches full-time there and my husband is an adjunct there and it seems like a good option from my limited experience.

In regards to notification laws, another option to the portfolio assessment or test scores is to form an 08 school, which is a non-chartered, non-tax supported school. It's different paperwork you need to send to the state DOE and your local school district, but you don't need to send in any form of assessment for your kids, just their names and addresses. If you aren't legally inclined, I'd suggest joining HSLDA for a year because they have guidance and form letters that follow the 08 school statute requirements. It's not hard, you just want to make sure you do it properly.

And I have to put in a plug for the children's hospital since I saw Cincy was mentioned lol - I lived at the one in Columbus a few years ago for 6 months while my baby boy was inpatient for chemo and a bone marrow transplant for high-risk leukemia and that place is amazing. They literally saved his life multiple times during treatment and we continue to go there frequently for all of his follow-up care. ☺️

Feel free to ask any more questions you may have about the area!!

 

 

Thank you so much for sharing all of this! (And best wishes to your little boy!) 

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On 7/4/2019 at 7:10 PM, Mom28kds said:

Looks like the other ladies have you covered regarding the rules for Ohio. I'd like to add that the person I use for assessments is in North Dayton and charges $10 per child $30 max for a family. She truly wants to help homeschoolers and doesn't believing in charging an arm and a leg for an assessment. She says that her job is to make sure each child is moving at their own ability not someone else's standards. She's great!

On another note, I'd like information on the Dayton groups or the ones that come to the Countryside YMCA as that is my hometown and we are members 🙂

I can't PM you. 

https://www.facebook.com/swohomeschoolmusicacademy/

Starts after Labor Day and ends before Memorial Day. One Christmas Concert and one spring concert. They are semester-long courses, so keep that in mind when you sign up--the desk people sometimes don't realize that, and the price definitely makes more sense for a semester. Spring semester is longer, so it's a little more expensive.

You can do just one semester or the other. Band/strings is on a different day than choir.

Both young beginners and older beginners are welcome as well as kids with experience. It's not unusual for some kids to be taking a 2nd or 3rd instrument, so sometimes one kid will be in advanced band but beginner strings, lol! 

They offer other homeschool classes, but I don't know about all of them. The others don't work with our schedule, but I think they do offer some kind of swim class. They have offered some academic classes in the past too.

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On 7/6/2019 at 8:36 PM, kbutton said:

I can't PM you. 

https://www.facebook.com/swohomeschoolmusicacademy/

Starts after Labor Day and ends before Memorial Day. One Christmas Concert and one spring concert. They are semester-long courses, so keep that in mind when you sign up--the desk people sometimes don't realize that, and the price definitely makes more sense for a semester. Spring semester is longer, so it's a little more expensive.

You can do just one semester or the other. Band/strings is on a different day than choir.

Both young beginners and older beginners are welcome as well as kids with experience. It's not unusual for some kids to be taking a 2nd or 3rd instrument, so sometimes one kid will be in advanced band but beginner strings, lol! 

They offer other homeschool classes, but I don't know about all of them. The others don't work with our schedule, but I think they do offer some kind of swim class. They have offered some academic classes in the past too.

Thank you! Sorry I didn't respond sooner. Was on vacation :)

 

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The 08 laws were an early way to homeschool in Ohio and still exist, but I think in general CHEO encourages people to homeschool under the homeschool laws. There are some requirements, like having a degree (not a problem for many, but still). I think on a personal level it's good to have the accountability of the homeschooling laws. Not essential, but it's just a good thing. There are some side issues that could creep up, as theoretically the state has the right to do fire inspections, etc. etc. They don't do this, to my knowledge, but the friends I have who homeschool under the 08 laws recognize that it's a possibility. Also, I think there were some issues with being listed somewhere. 

So definitely look into all the issues before you decide to go that route. Also, homeschooling under the homeschooling laws gives you an excusal letter that you can use to get teacher discounts. I'm not sure what documentation you'd have under 08. There's probably a way, dunno.

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