Menu
Jump to content

What's with the ads?

Chris in VA

Just for fun...What food(s) would you miss?

Recommended Posts

16 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

that was your in-laws, not Canada.   granted I haven't widely traveled (mainly BC/vacouver/victoria & alberta.  and around the great lakes), but there was real beef.

and I've found the same thing about eating beef. the iron sups aren't enough, and chicken doesn't do it.

I am sure it was my inlaws . I didn't really get to actually see much of Canada just lots on inlaws 

 even their minced beef had "helpers' ( garbage ) added. it was not 100% beef like I am use to 

 they had funny round flat disks that didn't resemble meat in any way that they called hamburgers??? here a hamburger is a bread roll with a beef patty and salad . I am guessing they meant rissoles but they are made out of meat here

 and there was hot dogs in cans - that really shocked me  - hot dogs have so many preservatives why would you need to can them - 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you don't can them they're not shelf-stable, Melissa. Doesn't matter how many preservatives they have, they still do rot.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, Tanaqui said:

If you don't can them they're not shelf-stable, Melissa. Doesn't matter how many preservatives they have, they still do rot.

here they are kept in the fridge part of the supermarket with other meat or in the deli section

 I read something once in an National Geographic magazine where they were doing an excavation of a rubbish tip in America somewhere. they had dug 20 years down. they found hot dogs that looked exactly like new - so many preservatives that they hadn't' decayed. Not that they would be safe to eat though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Melissa in Australia said:

here they are kept in the fridge part of the supermarket with other meat or in the deli section

 I read something once in an National Geographic magazine where they were doing an excavation of a rubbish tip in America somewhere. they had dug 20 years down. they found hot dogs that looked exactly like new - so many preservatives that they hadn't' decayed. Not that they would be safe to eat though

Far be it from me (a mostly vegetarian and hot dog hater in general) to defend them, but I really don't think that's possible. Hot dogs will mold if left in a refrigerator too long. So I don't think it's possible they'd survive in a dump for very long at all. My guess is that they' be molded/decayed/disintegrated within a week. Unless a scavenger animal ate them first (which is highly likely).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would have serious issues going without my dark roast coffee and French vanilla creamer. 

Decent NY pizza is important. There isn’t GREAT pizza in my area, but a few places are good enough to get by. Same for bagels.

Even though I no longer have it all that often, Taylor Ham (off brand pork roll would be acceptable) done right.  It’s not done right where I am, so I buy a whole roll and make it myself. Thick slabs are wrong. Thin slices microwaved are wrong. Complete absence is tragic.

The story about English breakfast kind of shook me, lol. I’m used to a wide variety of breakfast options, so limiting that would be hard for me!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Pawz4me said:

Far be it from me (a mostly vegetarian and hot dog hater in general) to defend them, but I really don't think that's possible. Hot dogs will mold if left in a refrigerator too long. So I don't think it's possible they'd survive in a dump for very long at all. My guess is that they' be molded/decayed/disintegrated within a week. Unless a scavenger animal ate them first (which is highly likely).

well they did have pictures..... turned me off ever eating hotdogs again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2019 at 12:37 AM, soror said:

chocolate, #1 always (not milk chocolate blech)

wait .... are there places where you cannot get dark chocolate ( I need the feinting smiley) 

remind me to check dark chocolate status of any country I may visit in the future

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing that I always pack when going to live overseas is Marmite. 

What I missed the first year that I lived in China (1985-6) was cheese and bacon.  There were pork products, but not the bacon of home - I hadn't thought that I cared about bacon, but apparently I did.    My step-aunt visited Beijing that year and treated me to lunch at one of the international hotels.  She ordered cheese for me and they popped it out of imported cans onto the plate.  I had taken a year's supply of tampons with me, as I knew they weren't available.

The thing that I miss when someone else is cooking for me is copious amounts of veg, well above five a day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Melissa in Australia said:

I am sure it was my inlaws . I didn't really get to actually see much of Canada just lots on inlaws 

 even their minced beef had "helpers' ( garbage ) added. it was not 100% beef like I am use to 

 they had funny round flat disks that didn't resemble meat in any way that they called hamburgers??? here a hamburger is a bread roll with a beef patty and salad . I am guessing they meant rissoles but they are made out of meat here

 and there was hot dogs in cans - that really shocked me  - hot dogs have so many preservatives why would you need to can them - 

hamburgers - are hamburger meat, ground beef/nothing added (some people add stuff to make the meat go farther, or give it "flavor"), shaped into a patty (I looked up rissoles - nope), on a bun.  add what you want to the bun.  lettuce, tomato, pickles, onion, crisp fried bacon, cheese, condiments, etc.

3 hours ago, Melissa in Australia said:

here they are kept in the fridge part of the supermarket with other meat or in the deli section

 I read something once in an National Geographic magazine where they were doing an excavation of a rubbish tip in America somewhere. they had dug 20 years down. they found hot dogs that looked exactly like new - so many preservatives that they hadn't' decayed. Not that they would be safe to eat though

hot dogs here are in a plastic wrapper, and kept in the refrigerated part of the grocery store.  those in a can are referred to as "cocktail" sausages, and are very small.

as has been said - they will rot in the fridge if left too long.  have a nice science project there with the mold that will grow on them.  so no, they wouldn't have been  "exactly like new".

36 minutes ago, Laura Corin said:

The only thing that I always pack when going to live overseas is Marmite. 

What I missed the first year that I lived in China (1985-6) was cheese and bacon.  There were pork products, but not the bacon of home - I hadn't thought that I cared about bacon, but apparently I did.    My step-aunt visited Beijing that year and treated me to lunch at one of the international hotels.  She ordered cheese for me and they popped it out of imported cans onto the plate.  I had taken a year's supply of tampons with me, as I knew they weren't available.

The thing that I miss when someone else is cooking for me is copious amounts of veg, well above five a day.

nephew's wife is Chinese.  they hosted a gathering when her parents came to visit, (her uncle, and a cousin also live in the area.) - asian pork belly is prepared very differently to the bacon we have, though it is from the same cut.  it was very good.

there's a little English tea house/grocery here.  they stock marmite, and a bunch of other things they import from the UK (and Canada).  they even have treacle tarts and pasties in their pastry case.  though I'd rather buy my nanaimo bars in Canada.  or just make my own.   (Nanaimo is a city on Vancouver island in british coloumbia Canada.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Obviously I miss my brand of teabags since I started a recent thread.😉  Dd misses lemonade (a fizzy drink that is not Sprite) when living in the US.

I have to say my family adjusted pretty well to living in the UK 13 years ago and most of the things we missed were either replaced by new favorites or have showed up on the store shelves here.  We now have Taco Bell which was my big one in the nearby city.  Cakes mixes arrived.  Canned pumpkin is easier now......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Melissa in Australia said:

well they did have pictures..... turned me off ever eating hotdogs again

 

Many dumps have so much trash that the lower levels are effectively anaerobic. That's why the hot dogs didn't decay, there wasn't enough oxygen for the bacteria to break them down. It has nothing to do with the hot dogs themselves - an apple core in that environment would also stay the same.

Alternatively, it could've been for the same reason McDonald's hamburgers don't show mold - they just get too dried out. Bacteria need moisture to do their work. No moisture, no mold, no visible rot. People keep on posting that same meme about the 20 year old hamburger "what do they put in it!!!" but you could make your own hamburger patty to those same specifications, nothing but ground beef and a little salt, and if it's thin enough and cooked through it will dry out before it has a chance to fall apart with mold. NOT that I suggest eating it in that case.

When we see old food that hasn't visibly rotted, people always say "oh, oh, oh, the preservatives!" but that is almost never the case.

(Honey will never mold or rot either, and that... okay, that technically IS preservatives, but when preservatives are sugar and lots of it, nobody thinks it's scary.)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know one thing we had a hard time adjusting to was milk.  Milk in different parts of the country tastes different due to what the cows eat.  I can't remember which place it tasted nasty but I know one place it did.

  We didn't miss much in our 3 years overseas and overall, we loved the food in Belgium and other areas we visited a whole lot more than American food.  But I do know that I had to adjust drinking coffee when out in public (at home, we had it the way I liked it). Iced tea was probably the hardest thing to adjust to not having.  Iced tea in Europe comes in cans and is fizzy.  Same with the lemonade.  We ended up getting into the bottled water habit and coffees as much as we could get when traveling.  

In very few areas of the country, but there are some, we are not thrilled with the restaurant options and even the grocery options.  We are can do people so we figure out how to cope but grocery stores and restaurant offerings are not all the same everywhere.  I do have to say that overall it has become a lot easier to find acceptable to good food but still, there are areas where, especially on certain days, it can be hard to find a good choice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, gardenmom5 said:

hamburgers - are hamburger meat, ground beef/nothing added (some people add stuff to make the meat go farther, or give it "flavor"), shaped into a patty (I looked up rissoles - nope), on a bun.  add what you want to the bun.  lettuce, tomato, pickles, onion, crisp fried bacon, cheese, condiments, etc.

 

well that is what I would call a hamburger as well

 but they served up regularly round flat disk things that came in a frozen box that they called hamburgers, they served them with veggies. they were a cardboardy colour and consistency. 

 

I am sure it was just my inlaws and nothing to do with Canadian cruisine - I was not meaning to insult Canadian eating but rather meaning what I missed when traveling overseas- the only time I have been overseas was visiting my inlaws in Canada.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Tanaqui said:

 

(Honey will never mold or rot either, and that... okay, that technically IS preservatives, but when preservatives are sugar and lots of it, nobody thinks it's scary.)

or salt.  there's a reason salt mines were so dang profitable!  "rich as the stroganoff's you'll never be".  they owned the salt mines in Russia.  they loaned money to the tzars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Certain specialty cheeses I find hard to locate elsewhere.  I am a cheese-a-holic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2019 at 2:30 PM, Patty Joanna said:

I've had to give up a bunch of foods due to allergies, and I have to say that the thing I miss the most is dairy, especially cheese.  

 

I have also had to give up a lot, and I’ve gotten used to a narrower diet. There are things I used to enjoy that I miss, but there are things I would be really sad to have to cull further, like hot black coffee, salsa, olive oil and oranges. These are my new staples, and I would sincerely miss them. 

I miss dairy, but can tolerate some  infrequent cheating in small amounts. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/15/2019 at 11:03 AM, Garga said:

 

I want some Junior MInts now.  Might have to pop over to the Dollar store and get a box.  Mmmm.

 

This thread is eye-opening.  I guess I thought *everyone* had pizza and peanut butter and cheddar cheese.  

I’m in America and I miss Cadbury Cream eggs and Cadbury mini eggs because they only come out at Easter time.  My MIL got a bunch of them this last Easter and froze them so they’d last all year.  Clever girl, she is.  I’m going to do that next year.  Meanwhile...I wait for Easter to come back around.

numnumnumnumnum

We have this in our fridge right now. Mmmmm.

Image result for cadbury creme block

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, chocolate-chip chooky said:

numnumnumnumnum

We have this in our fridge right now. Mmmmm.

Image result for cadbury creme block

 

 

What?!  What?!?!  I am literally drooling just looking at this.  I didn’t even know such things existed!  You guys are so lucky!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would miss tacos too. 

Peanut butter - I don't eat it a lot anymore, but I like having it around

Pizza - essential food for me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a student in Europe in the 80s, I remember going to an overpriced store in Paris to buy peanut butter, chocolate chips, Hellman's Mayo, and Oreos.  (Yes, I could get wonderful homemade mayo...but still.)  We also went to the Quartier Juif trying to find bagels and cream cheese. :)  Then I lucked out and got a roommate who was a flight attendant for Pan Am out of London.  She was great for bringing stuff back.  

I think today it would probably be meals I get at certain restaurants.... but yeah, if I hadn't had a nice everything bagel with cream cheese and tomato slices, I'd be missing that. :)   When we went to visit my husband's family in Egypt the first or second time, I brought everything I needed to make fajitas for them.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/14/2019 at 12:45 PM, chocolate-chip chooky said:

Prunes?? You're not exactly selling me on it 😂

 

It tastes like cold syrup I was forced to drink as a child. Terrible stuff. I don’t know why anybody would want to drink it for pleasure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Growing up overseas, I was pretty adaptable, but things I missed most:

Good pre-made ketchup (the stuff we got looked like tomato soup from a can)

Mustard

Deli meat

soft serve ice cream

Root beer (we tried making it, but could never get it right)

There are more, but that is what comes to mind.

However, it goes the other way too.......so many things I miss from my overseas availability.

Cheap Indian take out

best coffee in the world

Bitter Lemon 


Best tea in the world

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things I miss from my time overseas: amazing, diverse, fresh, regional Chinese food. Particularly the restaurant opposite our flat in south west China that would send two waitresses across the road with our order on crockery, then would pick the plates up later for washing. Oh, and the farmers' markets in Northern California.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...