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For those of you who do morning time...Large Family


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I will have a K/first grader, a 3rd grader, and a 4th grader.  I will also have a 4 year old, 2 year old, and new baby.  I had purchased all of the books to complete Ambleside Online Year 4, 3, and 1; but I  feel God is putting it on my heart to simplify.  

Besides a family morning time what would you add for the 3rd and 4th grader?  Currently I have Rod and Staff English, Spelling, and Grammar.  I was thinking of doing Latin with them ( I have getting started with and minimus).  My first grader needs to learn to read... I also have Visits to North America for my third and fourth grader.  

What would morning time look like and what else would I need to add.  I really don't want to burn out and want to be in homeschooling for the long haul.  I also want to be loving to my littles.  I think I overbought for this year.  I bought things for knitting, brushdrawing, sloyd ect... I don't want to be discouraged if I don't get to everything.

Also piano is a priority.  My oldest two do Hoffman Academy for 20-30 minutes a day.

Thank you..

Here is a link to my current idea for a schedule, but I don't know if it will be realistic with a newborn

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fYeLmP3UdkX2Z8tP3IlmJwMtRQGdojcqL4aSd7adiAc/edit?usp=sharing

 

 

Edited by alexandramarie
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My kids have mostly not needed intensive grammar, I teach basic parts of speech and writing mechanics and call it good. Some of them also pick up spelling naturally and don't need a curriculum.

Busy years with lots of littles I have focused on read alouds, math, and reading instruction for beginning readers. Otherwise library books of all sorts and whatever music or other extracurriculars seem to fit for my family.

Do your children need spelling curriculum or do they pick up spelling from their reading?

Same for writing and grammar. Not all children need a lot of explicit instruction in these. 

Science and history in elementary school are mostly about exposure.

If I were in your shoes with those ages I would do a family read aloud, math, reading instruction for the k/1st grader, and piano as my core. Any others subjects you want to do including grammar and Latin could possibly go in a loop schedule; you get to them on days you get to them and it isn't a disaster on days you don't because you will just pick up wherever you left off in the loop on the next day or the day after that.

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44 minutes ago, maize said:

My kids have mostly not needed intensive grammar, I teach basic parts of speech and writing mechanics and call it good. Some of them also pick up spelling naturally and don't need a curriculum.

Busy years with lots of littles I have focused on read alouds, math, and reading instruction for beginning readers. Otherwise library books of all sorts and whatever music or other extracurriculars seem to fit for my family.

Do your children need spelling curriculum or do they pick up spelling from their reading?

Same for writing and grammar. Not all children need a lot of explicit instruction in these. 

Science and history in elementary school are mostly about exposure.

If I were in your shoes with those ages I would do a family read aloud, math, reading instruction for the k/1st grader, and piano as my core. Any others subjects you want to do including grammar and Latin could possibly go in a loop schedule; you get to them on days you get to them and it isn't a disaster on days you don't because you will just pick up wherever you left off in the loop on the next day or the day after that.

Thank you Maize!  My son who is in 4th grade does need writing instruction, my daughter needs the spelling....Maybe I will loop Latin... I want my son to get used to writing every day.. Perhaps if I have him do one independent read and then write on it, that would be enough.  With Ambleside Online he would have three of his own readings scheduled daily.

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I have a similar spread as you, and below is what I have been doing and plan to do for next year.  I would add your piano as your main elective and only do 1 family focus at a time...and it is the optional part of your day.

Begin with family Bible or Charcter studies/Readalouds...whatever your religion or non religion is...hope that makes sense...this is a great way to start your day and gather all children together.

Math period 1st-when not needed by your olders I would read aloud to preschoolers or do workbooks with them.

Reading lessons or silent required reading can be done next allowing your quiettime in the afternoon to be used for those fun crafts that you don't want the toddlers doing OR if your littles nap early this order can be reversed.

I personally would quiz Spelling this summer and do direct teaching of Handwriting/Math facts allowing them to be on the backburner for fall.

I would do Rod and Staff English as it is awesome and  worth the time that you tutor each child.

 

I would offer my children options to do anything else independently.  You could offer reading list or assignment list for your type A kiddos...or baskets of opportunities for your more casual kiddos.

My personal philosphy is to focus on Bible, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic with children and add 1 family study that can be short lived like Latin/Greek roots or long lasting like Considering God's Creation which will take us all year next year.  I also tutor my kiddos each about half an hour daily pulling them out during the morning lessons...but encourage mine to do most things very independently.  We are incorporating a lot of Robinson Curriculum into our homeschool this year.  I like the routine, focus on reading and vocabulary, and working up to independence in math and writing.  I taught myself throughout school and felt it was to my benefit in life and college, but I enjoy tutoring my children as well so I do have that time for each of them...so a more motherly version of Robinson😉.

Brenda

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1 hour ago, homemommy83 said:

I have a similar spread as you, and below is what I have been doing and plan to do for next year.  I would add your piano as your main elective and only do 1 family focus at a time...and it is the optional part of your day.

Begin with family Bible or Charcter studies/Readalouds...whatever your religion or non religion is...hope that makes sense...this is a great way to start your day and gather all children together.

Math period 1st-when not needed by your olders I would read aloud to preschoolers or do workbooks with them.

Reading lessons or silent required reading can be done next allowing your quiettime in the afternoon to be used for those fun crafts that you don't want the toddlers doing OR if your littles nap early this order can be reversed.

I personally would quiz Spelling this summer and do direct teaching of Handwriting/Math facts allowing them to be on the backburner for fall.

I would do Rod and Staff English as it is awesome and  worth the time that you tutor each child.

 

I would offer my children options to do anything else independently.  You could offer reading list or assignment list for your type A kiddos...or baskets of opportunities for your more casual kiddos.

My personal philosphy is to focus on Bible, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic with children and add 1 family study that can be short lived like Latin/Greek roots or long lasting like Considering God's Creation which will take us all year next year.  I also tutor my kiddos each about half an hour daily pulling them out during the morning lessons...but encourage mine to do most things very independently.  We are incorporating a lot of Robinson Curriculum into our homeschool this year.  I like the routine, focus on reading and vocabulary, and working up to independence in math and writing.  I taught myself throughout school and felt it was to my benefit in life and college, but I enjoy tutoring my children as well so I do have that time for each of them...so a more motherly version of Robinson😉.

Brenda

Thank you Brenda!  This is very helpful!  We do scripture reading and hymn singing and scripture memory over breakfast.. Thank-you for your encouragement with Rod and Staff English.  I have really prayer about it and decided to forgo Classical Writing and use Rod and Staff for Grammar and writing.  My thoughts were if my kids can write well then they can write about what they read.  Doing spelling over summer is a good idea. I could use all my A.O. books as independent reading.

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I don't know if you can see my signature but I've also got my hands full with 2 16yos, an 8yo, 6yo, 5yo, 4yo, 3yo, 1yo and a baby almost due. I've been thinking about how to streamline things too. I've been focusing on Bible as my focus with reading, writing and arithmetic as well. We have a family Bible time with memory work and hymn singing every morning. This almost always happens. I've been using various things to teach reading but once they're reading I like to use the Pathway readers, either for free reading or if they don't read much themselves as something they're required to read. I've been using MEP for math but I don't think that I can keep it up. I think that I need something quicker. I've been thinking about Ray's. I've also used R&S English for my older two. I really appreciated it. I plan to start my younger ones with the year 3 book when they're about 9yo. I've been reading SOTW1 to a couple of my little as just a read-aloud. Mostly though, I just use library books to cover history and science until about age 12. I just try to be intentional about the books that I pick. We're rural so they get a lot of nature exposure naturally. I'd probably do more intentional science if we lived in an urban environment.

Just yesterday though I found a blog of a mother of 15 doing some CM style work. Here's the link: http://momdelights.com/index.php/2017/07/31/charlotte-mason-real-moms/. I found the idea of doing narrations with several children for the same text interesting and the idea of using copywork/dictation as a core part of our language arts a nice way to streamline school work.

If you're interested in considering a gentler approach than Latin, you could consider English from the Roots Up. It's really nice.

Librivox.org has a really good audio version of Our Island Story. You could use some audio books to cover your knowledge based subjects (e.g. history, science) and focus your school time on the skill based subjects (e.g. math, reading, writing, piano).

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1 hour ago, rose said:

I don't know if you can see my signature but I've also got my hands full with 2 16yos, an 8yo, 6yo, 5yo, 4yo, 3yo, 1yo and a baby almost due. I've been thinking about how to streamline things too. I've been focusing on Bible as my focus with reading, writing and arithmetic as well. We have a family Bible time with memory work and hymn singing every morning. This almost always happens. I've been using various things to teach reading but once they're reading I like to use the Pathway readers, either for free reading or if they don't read much themselves as something they're required to read. I've been using MEP for math but I don't think that I can keep it up. I think that I need something quicker. I've been thinking about Ray's. I've also used R&S English for my older two. I really appreciated it. I plan to start my younger ones with the year 3 book when they're about 9yo. I've been reading SOTW1 to a couple of my little as just a read-aloud. Mostly though, I just use library books to cover history and science until about age 12. I just try to be intentional about the books that I pick. We're rural so they get a lot of nature exposure naturally. I'd probably do more intentional science if we lived in an urban environment.

Just yesterday though I found a blog of a mother of 15 doing some CM style work. Here's the link: http://momdelights.com/index.php/2017/07/31/charlotte-mason-real-moms/. I found the idea of doing narrations with several children for the same text interesting and the idea of using copywork/dictation as a core part of our language arts a nice way to streamline school work.

If you're interested in considering a gentler approach than Latin, you could consider English from the Roots Up. It's really nice.

Librivox.org has a really good audio version of Our Island Story. You could use some audio books to cover your knowledge based subjects (e.g. history, science) and focus your school time on the skill based subjects (e.g. math, reading, writing, piano).

Thank you Rose for all your input.  I have looked at the mom delights blog and listened to her youtube videos.  I think for us we have been already doing composer study, solfa, handicrafts, folk dances, picture study, spanish.. ect... that it feels sad to have to take things away; but with a child who I think is dyslexic and needs to learn to read and a new baby and having to now teach grammar/ writing; I feel I have my hands full.

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1 hour ago, alexandramarie said:

Thank you Rose for all your input.  I have looked at the mom delights blog and listened to her youtube videos.  I think for us we have been already doing composer study, solfa, handicrafts, folk dances, picture study, spanish.. ect... that it feels sad to have to take things away; but with a child who I think is dyslexic and needs to learn to read and a new baby and having to now teach grammar/ writing; I feel I have my hands full.

I hear you. I long to have more time to expand our studying. I've got one with dyslexia and my 5yo is probably on the autism spectrum. There's just absolutely no more hours in the day to squeeze out more. It's encouraging to me to see my older two on their way to becoming functional adults.

For composer study, you could rely on audio as well. We found some classics for kids cassettes that my littles really enjoy. They're audio dramas about the famous composers. Here's an example of one we've listened to: Vivaldi's Ring Mystery. There might be some other ways to squeeze out a few extras if you're creative.

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6 hours ago, rose said:

I don't know if you can see my signature but I've also got my hands full with 2 16yos, an 8yo, 6yo, 5yo, 4yo, 3yo, 1yo and a baby almost due. I've been thinking about how to streamline things too. I've been focusing on Bible as my focus with reading, writing and arithmetic as well. We have a family Bible time with memory work and hymn singing every morning. This almost always happens. I've been using various things to teach reading but once they're reading I like to use the Pathway readers, either for free reading or if they don't read much themselves as something they're required to read. I've been using MEP for math but I don't think that I can keep it up. I think that I need something quicker. I've been thinking about Ray's. I've also used R&S English for my older two. I really appreciated it. I plan to start my younger ones with the year 3 book when they're about 9yo. I've been reading SOTW1 to a couple of my little as just a read-aloud. Mostly though, I just use library books to cover history and science until about age 12. I just try to be intentional about the books that I pick. We're rural so they get a lot of nature exposure naturally. I'd probably do more intentional science if we lived in an urban environment.

Just yesterday though I found a blog of a mother of 15 doing some CM style work. Here's the link: http://momdelights.com/index.php/2017/07/31/charlotte-mason-real-moms/. I found the idea of doing narrations with several children for the same text interesting and the idea of using copywork/dictation as a core part of our language arts a nice way to streamline school work.

If you're interested in considering a gentler approach than Latin, you could consider English from the Roots Up. It's really nice.

Librivox.org has a really good audio version of Our Island Story. You could use some audio books to cover your knowledge based subjects (e.g. history, science) and focus your school time on the skill based subjects (e.g. math, reading, writing, piano).

I love momdelights.com and plan to incorporate her lesson books with our Robinson books...they are great.  I am also having a new little one...in the morning😁...pray it goes well.  My kiddos are 15, 13, 10, 8,5,and 2 and half ...and tomorrow newborn.  I love to streamline our homeschooling.  You may like Our House on Youtube...Karen is so encouraging.

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6 hours ago, rose said:

 

If you're interested in considering a gentler approach than Latin, you could consider English from the Roots Up. 

This is something we are doing as a 6 week intensive as well...as a group, but studied independently AFTER initial introductions of new roots.  These are the type of things that are great to do in the summer before the school year.

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6 minutes ago, homemommy83 said:

I love momdelights.com and plan to incorporate her lesson books with our Robinson books...they are great.  I am also having a new little one...in the morning😁...pray it goes well.  My kiddos are 15, 13, 10, 8,5,and 2 and half ...and tomorrow newborn.  I love to streamline our homeschooling.  You may like Our House on Youtube...Karen is so encouraging.

WOW! My God's hand be with you. 👏

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7 hours ago, homemommy83 said:

I love momdelights.com and plan to incorporate her lesson books with our Robinson books...they are great.  I am also having a new little one...in the morning😁...pray it goes well.  My kiddos are 15, 13, 10, 8,5,and 2 and half ...and tomorrow newborn.  I love to streamline our homeschooling.  You may like Our House on Youtube...Karen is so encouraging.

Praying for you!

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On 5/23/2019 at 2:23 PM, alexandramarie said:

Thank you Rose for all your input.  I have looked at the mom delights blog and listened to her youtube videos.  I think for us we have been already doing composer study, solfa, handicrafts, folk dances, picture study, spanish.. ect... that it feels sad to have to take things away; but with a child who I think is dyslexic and needs to learn to read and a new baby and having to now teach grammar/ writing; I feel I have my hands full.

I've been thinking about this thread. I think I'm coming to the conclusion that having a large family necessarily does take some things away from our children BUT I'm also convinced that there are innumerable blessings in having a large family as well. I can't read so often to my younger children as I did with my older children but my younger children have so many more companions. I've noticed that when my older children were young I had more time for special projects but I also controlled much more of what they did. Now with my young children it's the opposite; I don't have time for all the projects but I allow them much more freedom because I just need them to be busy. My parenting style is completely different but I think that my children are better off now. They do get short changed in some ways but I really do think that it's worth it, even from their perspective.

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11 hours ago, rose said:

 

I've been thinking about this thread. I think I'm coming to the conclusion that having a large family necessarily does take some things away from our children BUT I'm also convinced that there are innumerable blessings in having a large family as well. I can't read so often to my younger children as I did with my older children but my younger children have so many more companions. I've noticed that when my older children were young I had more time for special projects but I also controlled much more of what they did. Now with my young children it's the opposite; I don't have time for all the projects but I allow them much more freedom because I just need them to be busy. My parenting style is completely different but I think that my children are better off now. They do get short changed in some ways but I really do think that it's worth it, even from their perspective.

Thank you Rose for those sweet words of encouragement and that reminder!  As far as not being able to read as much to my younger kids; I do notice they are still getting read to a lot.  My olders love to read picture books to their younger siblings; it's such a sweet thing to watch.

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