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mrhmhy

HS Biology suggestions for 9 yr old?

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DS9 is pretty solidly through middle school science (using Real Science Odyssey and then Real Science 4 Kids Focus On series.  Would like to do high school biology next year - actually give him a grade, add to transcript for college admissions.  He’s definitely science oriented. A lot of the homeschool curriculums I’ve seen appear too basic. Suggestions?  I bought an old Prentice Hall high school biology book on Amazon.  Is that a good route or is there something better?

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We enjoyed Ellen McHenry's units and didn't find them too basic. Cells (book) was great. Mapping the Body with Art (video lessons + drawing) is particularly good, in my opinion.

ETA: I'm pretty sure there are sample pages on her website. I think you need to look under the 'store' tab.

Edited by chocolate-chip chooky

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I was able to petition the professor for Athena's Honors High School Biology class to let him enroll in that class for the fall even though he is under the age minimum that she prefers. However, I was able to do that because I gave her the syllabus of a honors level 7th-9th grade life science course he just completed with a high A in the class. This course had graded presentations, labs, tests and homework.

Edited by calbear

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Unless you are putting him into college next year, nothing your nine year old does now is going to be on his high school transcript.  If you don't like your first choice, he has ample time to redo with another program .  I've gone this route many times with my new 9th grader.

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I would add that you don't need to worry about high school credits at this age. If you are on this progression for science, then your student will have science credits in higher level coursework when he is actually in high school.

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15 hours ago, calbear said:

I would add that you don't need to worry about high school credits at this age. If you are on this progression for science, then your student will have science credits in higher level coursework when he is actually in high school.

 

Hes on this track in most areas, and we were looking at having him officially start high school fairly soon (needs to get through pre-algebra first) with the plan that he would likely graduate around 13 or 14 and then apply to college.  So I thought he’d actually need to show Biology grades and work.

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Not sure about other areas, I know for California, they don't allow credits earned prior to your official high school years to count for high school except for math and foreign language. 

Certainly, I've seen private homeschoolers include all sorts of coursework completed prior to 9th grade on their transcripts. 

Edited by calbear

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Just now, mrhmhy said:

 

Hes on this track in most areas, and we were looking at having him officially start high school fairly soon (needs to get through pre-algebra first) with the plan that he would likely graduate around 13 or 14 and then apply to college.  So I thought he’d actually need to show Biology grades and work.

 

Is there a reason why you would want to graduate him so young vs. having him just dual enroll in college classes while in high school?

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42 minutes ago, SeaConquest said:

 

Is there a reason why you would want to graduate him so young vs. having him just dual enroll in college classes while in high school?

 

Obviosuly he’d live at home if that age, and so would likely do UW-Madison. They only allow one course per semester for high school students.  He’d have to be fully accepted as a regular student to do more.

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On 5/15/2019 at 4:18 PM, mrhmhy said:

 

Obviosuly he’d live at home if that age, and so would likely do UW-Madison. They only allow one course per semester for high school students.  He’d have to be fully accepted as a regular student to do more.

Graduating early isnt really advantageous for most students and not yet having completed pre-alg at age 9 means that while advanced, he isn't so advanced that early graduation is the only recourse for him to have access to challenging content. (I have had kids taking alg at 10 who are now adults, so I am familiar with students functioning at that level.)

Many people believe racing forward and entering college young opens more doors. Then there is the opposite perspective where letting them study subjects broader and deeper allows them to develop greater skills to be more competitive to reach their long term goals vs just being young and blending in with the crowd skills.

A 14 yr old college freshman with typical high school level achievements will not stand out as much as an 18 yr old freshman with 300-400 level coursework readiness. The 18 yr old will be invited to join research, travel to conferences, do poster presentations. They will stand out as a top student. The 14 yr old will be just like any other freshman taking freshman level work, just young. Age is not an academic boost or standout feature.

Fwiw, our ds who is now in grad school for physics would not be where he is today if we had graduated him early. He is where he is bc he always stood out as a top, high-achieving student. He arrived on campus yrs ahead of his peers. He took grad classes as an UG. Professors don't know ages and they don't care how old a student is. They want mature, responsible students who can walk through the door and immediately start positive contributions to their research projects.

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On 5/15/2019 at 3:18 PM, mrhmhy said:

 

Obviosuly he’d live at home if that age, and so would likely do UW-Madison. They only allow one course per semester for high school students.  He’d have to be fully accepted as a regular student to do more.

What are your community colleges like? Do they have articulation agreements with UW? Which classes automatically transfer to UW? What classes are required as core courses for UW undergrads? What basic courses are required for your ds's potential major that would be worth taking in high school? 

I'm asking these questions to give you an idea of what you want to look for on UW and your local CC's websites to get a feel for what's available to high school students who dual enroll. For example, in Texas, our CCs are geared to providing the courses that will transfer to our state universities and the state universities accept those credits automatically. So it doesn't matter if you take the calculus sequence at your local CC or at UT, they will both count. Of course, some teachers are better than others, some schools are more rigorous than others, but the syllabus and textbook choices are standardized. If your CCs don't offer automatically transferable credits, I'd look at AP classes because those also offer an objective outside standard that leads to college credit (but will likely be more expensive if you have discounted or free CC DE tuition.)

The reason my dd is taking CC classes in high school is to finish up the core requirements and basic classes before she starts at a 4 year school (in her case, probably UT Austin or Texas A&M). She is planning to attend university for 4 years but she'd rather be able to double major, take advantage of internship and research opportunities and study abroad instead of just checking the boxes for the extensive required coursework that TX public universities require.

For a high school bio class, I did this one with my dd in 6th grade:

https://quarksandquirks.wordpress.com/biology-hs-level/

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2 hours ago, chiguirre said:

What are your community colleges like? Do they have articulation agreements with UW? Which classes automatically transfer to UW? What classes are required as core courses for UW undergrads? What basic courses are required for your ds's potential major that would be worth taking in high school? 

I'm asking these questions to give you an idea of what you want to look for on UW and your local CC's websites to get a feel for what's available to high school students who dual enroll. For example, in Texas, our CCs are geared to providing the courses that will transfer to our state universities and the state universities accept those credits automatically. So it doesn't matter if you take the calculus sequence at your local CC or at UT, they will both count. Of course, some teachers are better than others, some schools are more rigorous than others, but the syllabus and textbook choices are standardized. If your CCs don't offer automatically transferable credits, I'd look at AP classes because those also offer an objective outside standard that leads to college credit (but will likely be more expensive if you have discounted or free CC DE tuition.)

The reason my dd is taking CC classes in high school is to finish up the core requirements and basic classes before she starts at a 4 year school (in her case, probably UT Austin or Texas A&M). She is planning to attend university for 4 years but she'd rather be able to double major, take advantage of internship and research opportunities and study abroad instead of just checking the boxes for the extensive required coursework that TX public universities require.

For a high school bio class, I did this one with my dd in 6th grade:

https://quarksandquirks.wordpress.com/biology-hs-level/

 

We are planning to do the same here. I have no idea if my son will want to attend a UC school, but in case he does, he will likely receive his associate's degree from CC concurrent with high school graduation. That way, his general ed coursework will be complete and then he can either focus on major and grad level coursework during ugrad or perhaps double major and/or study abroad. If he decides to attend a private school or service academy instead, he likely won't receive any credit or advanced standing for the DE courses, but he might receive advanced placement into higher level coursework and improve his chances of admissions by demonstrating rigor and his academic passion for science. We have no desire to graduate him early (nor does he have any desire, at present, to leave); he will likely need all 18 years of executing functioning development under our roof before he flies the nest.

Anyway, lots of options. For bio this year, we worked through a year-long Outschool high school bio series, watched some Great Courses lectures, read the Miller Levine bio book, took 3 weeks of a microbio camp at CTY, and did some labs/demos, but I expect that he will take the Bio for science majors series at our CC in 8th~ish grade (after he finishes gen chem). So, none of what we did this year was for "credit" on his transcript.

Edited by SeaConquest

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